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Julius Caesar

Act I, Scene 2

A public place.
 
[Flourish. Enter CAESAR; ANTONY, for the course; CALPURNIA, PORTIA, DECIUS BRUTUS, CICERO, BRUTUS, CASSIUS, and CASCA; a great crowd following, among them a Soothsayer]
 
CAESAR
          ,
      Calpur|nia./
 
CASCA
                     ,    ,    ,         __
                   Peace ho,| Caesar | speaks.
 
CAESAR
          ,   2
      Calpur|nia.
 
CALPURNIA
                    ,         ,
                  Here | my lord.  (pickup)
 
CAESAR
        ,             ,      ,      ,        ,
      Stand you | direct|ly in | Anton|ius' way,
            ,         ,           ,        ,    ,
5     When he | doth run | his course.| Anto|nius.
 
ANTONY
                                  ,            ,
                                 Caesar,| my lord.  (picked up)
 
CAESAR
          ,     ,              ,        ,    ,
      Forget | not in | your speed | Anto|nius,
           ,         ,   2    ,         ,       ,
      To touch | Calpur|nia; for | our el|ders say,
           ,         ,      ,         ,      ,
      The bar|ren touch|ed in | this ho|ly chase,
             ,           ,         ,
10    Shake^off | their ste|rile curse.
 
ANTONY
                                        ,      2    ,
                                        I shall re|member:
            ,        ,     ,            ,         ,
      When Cae|sar says | do this,| it is | performed.
 
CAESAR
           ,         ,         ,    ,     ,
      Set^on;| and leave | no ce|remo|ny out.
 
[Flourish]
 
SOOTHSAYER
       ,
      Caesar.
 
CAESAR
              T   T    T     oo   oo
             Ha? Who calls?|    |
 
CASCA
          ,        ,          ,       ,           ,
15    Bid e|very noise | be still:| peace yet^|again.
 
CAESAR
           ,       ,         ,            ,         ,
      Who is | it in | the press | that calls | on me?
          ,         ,       ,     2        ,         ,
      I hear | a tongue | shriller than | all the | music,
           ,         ,      ,             ,          ,
      Cry Cae|sar: speak,| Caesar | is turned | to hear.
 
SOOTHSAYER
          ,          ,         ,
      Beware | the ides | of March.
 
CAESAR
                                          ,         ,
20                                  What man | is that?
 
BRUTUS
      .   T    T     T       2    ,          ,         ,
      A soothsayer bids | you beware | the ides | of March.
 
CAESAR
       ,            ,         ,        ,          ,
      Set him | before | me; let | me see | his face.
 
CASSIUS
       ,         ,      2         ,       T  . T   T       2->
      Fellow,| come from the | throng;| look upon Cae||sar.
 
CAESAR
             ,       ,    2      T     T     T       ,
      What sayst | thou to me | now? Speak once | again.
 
SOOTHSAYER
          ,          ,         ,
25    Beware | the ides | of March.   \\
 
CAESAR
       ,          ,        ,         ,            ,
      He is | a drea|mer; let | us leave | him: pass.
 
[Sennet. Exeunt all except BRUTUS and CASSIUS]
 
CASSIUS
            ,        ,         ,      ,          ,
      Will you | go see | the or|der of | the course?
 
BRUTUS
          ,
      Not I.
 
CASSIUS
                ,         ,
            I pray | you do.
 
BRUTUS
                              2    ,      ,
                             I am not | gamesome:
      ,        ,           ,              ,      ,
30    I do | lack some | part of | that quick | spirit
            ,       ,    ,        ,        ,      ->
      That is | in An|tony:| let me | not hin||der
       ,         ,         ,           ,          o
      Cas|sius your | desires;| I'll leave | you.
 
CASSIUS
       ,          ,       ,          ,         ,
      Brutus,| I do | observe | you now | of late:
          ,          ,           ,          ,      ,
      I have | not from | your eyes | that gen|tleness
            ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
35    And show | of love | as I | was wont | to have:
            ,          ,              ,     ,          ,
      You bear | too stub|born and / too strange | a hand
      ,              ,            ,
      Over | your friend | that loves | you.
 
BRUTUS
                                              ,    ,
                                             Cas|sius,
          ,         ,        ,           ,          ,
      Be not | deceived:| if I | have veiled | my look,
          ,          ,       ,        ,      ,
40    I turn | the trou|ble of | my coun|tenance
        ,        ,        ,     ,         ,
      Merely | upon | myself.| Vexed | I am
           ,          ,               ,   ,      ,
      Of late | with pas|sions of / some dif|ference,
          ,         ,     ,       ,       ,
      Concep|tions on|ly pro|per to | myself,
              ,           ,         ,     ,   2    ,
      Which give | some soil |(perhaps)| to my be|haviors;
           ,          ,               ,     ,            ,
45    But let | not there|fore my / good friends | be grieved
          ,           ,       ,        ,        ,
      (Among | which num|ber Cas|sius be | you one)
                ,   ,     ,        ,       ,
      Nor con/strue a|ny fur|ther my | neglect,
                    ,   ,        ,         ,        ,
      Than that / poor Bru|tus with | himself | at war,
           ,          ,          ,       ,       ,
      Forgets | the shows | of love | to o|ther men.
 
CASSIUS
        ,   ,        2         ,        ,          ,
50    Then Bru/tus, I have | much mis|took your | passion;
           ,           ,           ,          ,          ,      ->
      By means | whereof | this breast | of mine | hath bur||ied
          ,           ,      ,       ,        ,     ,      ->
      Thoughts | of great | value,| worthy | cogi||tations.
        ,    2        ,          2     ,           ,
      Tell me good | Brutus,| can you see | your face?
 
BRUTUS
       ,  ,                   ,          ,        ,
      No Cas/sius; for | the eye | sees not | itself
           ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
55    But by | reflec|tion, by | some o|ther things.
 
CASSIUS
             ,
      'Tis just:  (pickup)
       ,    2      ,       ,      ,        ,
      And it is | very | much la|mented,| Brutus,
            ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      That you | have no | such mir|rors as | will turn
            ,       ,       ,       ,         ,
      Your hid|den wor|thiness | into | your eye,
            ,           ,          ,       ,          ,
60    That you | might see | your sha|dow. I | have heard,
             ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      Where ma|ny of | the best | respect | in Rome,
           ,       ,       ,         ,      2    ,      2->
      (Except | immor|tal Cae|sar) spea|king of Bru||tus
            ,        ,      ,          ,        ,
      And groa|ning un|derneath | this a|ge's yoke,
              ,           ,      ,       ,          ,
      Have wished | that no|ble Bru|tus had | his eyes.
 
BRUTUS
       ,  2        ,          ,           ,        ,
65    Into what | dangers | would you | lead me,| Cassius,
            ,            ,         ,       ,       ,
      That you | would have | me seek | into | myself
            ,           ,    T   T  T
      For that | which is | not in me?  (picked up)
 
CASSIUS
             ,          ,        ,        ,          ,
      Therefore | good Bru|tus, be | prepared | to hear:
            ,           ,         ,       ,          ,
      And since | you know | you can|not see | yourself
           ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
70    So well | as by | reflec|tion, I | your glass,
            ,      ,       ,      ,         ,
      Will mod|estly | disco|ver to | yourself
            ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      That of | yourself | which you | yet know | not of.
           ,        ,      2    ,    ,        ,
      And be | not jea|lous on me,| gentle | Brutus:
           ,      ,        ,        ,        ,
      Were I | a com|mon laugh|er, or | did use
           ,           ,    ,      ,          ,
75    To stale | with or|dina|ry oaths | my love
         ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      To e|very new | protes|ter; if | you know
           ,        ,        ,         ,           ,
      That I | do fawn | on men | and hug | them hard
           ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      And af|ter scan|dal them:| or if | you know
           ,        ,        ,        ,       ,
      That I | profess | myself | in ban|queting
          ,          ,           ,        ,      ,
80    To all | the rout,| then hold | me dan|gerous.
 
[Flourish, and shout]
 
BRUTUS
             ,            ,             ,   ,         ,      ->
      What means | this shou|ting? I / do fear,| the peo||ple
         ,      ,          2          ,
      Choose | Caesar | for their | king.
 
CASSIUS
                                           ,               ,
                                          Aye,/ do you | fear it?
             ,        ,           ,           ,        ,
      Then must | I think | you would | not have | it so.
 
BRUTUS
                 ,    ,         ,        ,          ,
85    I would / not, Cas|sius; yet | I love | him well.
            ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      But where|fore do | you hold | me here | so long?
            ,        ,          ,         ,        ,
      What is | it that | you would | impart | to me?
          ,        ,         ,         ,   2     ,
      If it | be aught | toward | the gen|eral good,
           ,    2    ,     ,          ,     2      ,
      Set ho|nor in one | eye and | death in the | other,
          ,          ,         ,       ,    2    ,
90    And I | will look | on both | indif|ferently,
           ,          ,         ,         ,       ,
      For let | the gods | so speed | me as | I love
            ,        ,       ,               ,    ,
      The name | of ho|nor more | than I / fear death.
 
CASSIUS
          ,          ,        2      ,  ,     ,
      I know | that vir|tue to be / in you | Brutus,
           ,       ,        ,          ,        ,      ->
      As well | as I | do know | your out|ward fa||vor.
        ,     ,   3  3       ,         ,       ,
95    Well,| honor is the | subject | of my | sto|ry.
         ,        ,          ,        ,       ,
      I can|not tell | what you | and o|ther men
        ,               ,         ,        ,        ,
      Think of | this life;| but for | my sin|gle self,
         ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      I had | as lief | not be | as live | to be
          ,         ,        ,        ,       ,
      In awe | of such | a thing | as I | myself.
                ,    ,        ,        ,         ,
100   I was / born free | as Cae|sar; so | were you:
           ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
      We both | have fed | as well,| and we | can both
          ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      Endure | the win|ter's cold | as well | as he:
            ,      ,       ,         ,      ,
      For once,| upon | a raw | and gus|ty day,
            ,        ,      ,         ,           ,
      The trou|bled Ti|ber cha|fing with | her shores,
       ,         ,    2       T    T     T         ,
105   Caesar | said to me | Darst thou, Cas|sius, now
            ,         ,      ,         ,       ,
      Leap^in | with me | into | this an|gry flood,
            ,        ,        ,       ,          ,
      And swim | to yon|der point?| Upon | the word,
         ,        ,      ,        ,       ,
      Accou|tred as | I was,| I plun|ged in
            ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      And bade | him fol|low; so | indeed | he did.
           ,          ,          ,        ,       ,
110   The tor|rent roared,| and we | did buf|fet it
            ,      ,         ,        ,      ,
      With lus|ty sin|ews, throw|ing it | aside
            ,        ,           ,       2    ,      ,
      And stem|ming it | with hearts | of contro|versy;
           ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      But ere | we could | arrive | the point | proposed,
       ,         T      T   T    ,          2    ,
      Caesar | cried, Help me | Cassius,| or I sink.
      ,          ,             ,    ,  ,
115   I (as | Aene|as, our / great an|cestor,
       ,                ,          ,      ,          ,       2->
      Did from | the flames | of Troy,| upon | his shoul||der
           ,       ,        ,     ,              ,          ,    2->
      The old | Anchi|ses bear)| so from | the waves || of Ti|ber
          ,         ,      ,          2      ,
      Did I | the tired | Caesar.| And this man
          ,        ,       ,         ,        ,
      Is now | become | a god,| and Cas|sius is
          ,         ,         ,           ,         ,    2->
120   A wret|ched crea|ture, and | must bend | his bo||dy
          ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      If Cae|sar care|lessly | but nod | on him.
          ,       ,       ,        ,         ,
      He had | a fe|ver when | he was | in Spain,
            ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      And when | the fit | was on | him, I | did mark
           ,         ,            ,          ,          ,
      How he | did shake:| 'tis true,| this god | did shake;
           ,        ,          ,           ,       ,
125   His cow|ard lips | did from | their co|lour fly,
                   ,   ,            ,          ,          ,
      And that / same eye | whose bend | doth awe | the world
            ,         ,       ,         ,          ,
      Did lose | his lus|ter: I | did hear | him groan:
       ,      2          ,         ,           ,         ,
      Aye, and that | tongue of | his that | bade the | Romans
        ,              ,           ,        ,           ,
      Mark him | and write | his spee|ches in | their books,
        ,         ,       ,    2         ,       ,  2
130   Alas,| it cried,| give me some | drink Ti|tinius,
        2    ,      ,          ,          ,      ,
      As a sick | girl. Ye | gods, it | doth a|maze me
         ,         ,       ,       ,         ,
      A man | of such | a fee|ble tem|per should
          ,          ,       3   3   ,        ,
      So get | the start | of the majes|tic world
      <-      ,           ,     ,
        And bear || the palm alone.
 
[Shout. Flourish]
 
BRUTUS
                                ,       ,   2      ,
135                           Ano|ther gen|eral shout?
         ,       ,            ,         ,       ,
      I do | believe | that these | applau|ses are
         2      ,     ,         ,           ,         ,
      For some new | honors | that are | heaped on | Caesar.
 
CASSIUS
           ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      Why man,| he doth | bestride | the nar|row world
        ,         ,              ,  ,      ,
      Like a | Colos|sus, and / we pet|ty men
        ,                 ,    ,          ,       ,
140   Walk un|der his / huge legs | and peep | about
           ,          ,         ,    ,        ,
      To find | ourselves | dishon|ora|ble graves.
       ,              ,         ,        ,           ,
      Men at | some time | are mas|ters of | their fates:
            ,       ,   ,             ,             ,
      The fault |(dear Bru/tus) is | not in | our stars,
           ,         ,           ,        ,      ,
      But in | ourselves,| that we | are un|derlings.
       ,    2       ,         ,        2      ,         ,
145   Brutus and | Caesar:| what should be | in that | Caesar?
                     ,    ,         ,        ,           ,
      Why should / that name | be soun|ded more | than yours?
        ,             ,         ,       2     ,        ,
      Write them | toge|ther, yours | is as fair | a name;
        ,               ,        ,          ,          ,
      Sound them,| it doth | become | the mouth | as well;
        ,              ,       ,       ,         ,        ->
      Weigh them,| it is | as hea|vy; con|jure with || 'em,
       ,     2       ,          x          ,        ,       ->
150   Bru|tus will start | a spirit | as soon | as Cae||sar.
       ,      2      ,         ,          ,         ,
      Now | in the names | of all | the gods | at once,
        ,           ,           ,         ,        ,
      Upon | what meat | doth this | our Cae|sar feed,
            ,        ,          ,      ,                 ,
      That he | is grown | so great?| Age, thou | art shamed.
        ,                 ,          ,         ,        ,
      Rome, thou | hast lost | the breed | of no|ble bloods.
             ,           ,       ,      T    .    T     T
155   When^went | there by | an age,| since the great flood,
           ,         ,            ,                 ,   ,
      But it | was famed | with more | than with / one man?
             ,           ,          ,            ,          ,
      When could | they say |(till now)| that talked | of Rome,
                   ,    ,        ,                ,   ,
      That her / wide walls | encom|passed but / one man?
       ,            ,        ,          ,       ,
      Now is | it Rome | indeed | and room | enough,
             ,         ,             ,   ,     ,
160   When there | is in | it but / one on|ly man.
      ,            ,          ,          ,        ,
      O! You | and I | have heard | our fa|thers say,
             ,       ,        ,           ,             ,
      There was | a Bru|tus once | that would | have brooked
         2  ,       ,    2     ,          ,          ,
      The eter|nal de|vil to keep | his state | in Rome
          ,    ,     2    ,
      As ea|sily | as a king.  (match end of next)
 
BRUTUS
            ,         ,        ,       ,        ,        ->
165   That you | do love | me, I | am no|thing jea||lous;
        ,       2        ,        ,       ,          ,
      What | you would work | me to,| I have | some aim:
          ,           ,           ,         ,           ,
      How I | have thought | of this | and of | these times,
      ,      2     ,         ,       ,          ,
      I shall re|count here|after;| for this | present,
      ,      2       ,           ,        ,        ,
      I would not | so (with | love I | might en|treat you)
         ,     ,         ,           ,           ,
170   Be a|ny fur|ther moved.| What you | have said
          ,        ,        ,          ,        ,
      I will | consi|der; what | you have | to say
          ,          ,          ,          ,        ,
      I will | with pa|tience hear,| and find | a time
             ,         ,         ,              ,     ,
      Both^meet | to hear | and an|swer such^/high things.
             ,        ,        ,       ,     ,
      Till then,| my no|ble friend,| chew u|pon this:
       ,            ,       ,      ,     ,
175   Brutus | had ra|ther be | a vil|lager
            ,       ,         ,       ,         ,
      Than to | repute | himself | a son | of Rome
       ,              ,        ,        ,          ,
      Under | these hard | condi|tions as | this time
           ,        ,        x
      Is like | to lay | upon us.  (match end of prev)
 
CASSIUS
      ,        ,              ,      ,
      I am | glad that | my weak | words
      <-          ,            ,           ,         ,          ,
180     Have | struck but || thus much | show of | fire from | Brutus.
 
BRUTUS
      <-      ,            ,         ,       ,      ,       o
        The games || are done | and Cae|sar is | retur|ning.
 
CASSIUS
                  ,   ,          ,      ,          ,
      As they / pass by,| pluck^Cas|ca by | the sleeve;
                 ,    ,    2      ,     ,          ,
      And he / will (af|ter his sour | fashion)| tell you
        ,        2    ,       ,        ,       ,
      What | hath procee|ded wor|thy note | today.
 
[Re-enter CAESAR and his Train]
 
BRUTUS
      ,         ,            ,          ,     ,
185   I will | do so.| But look | you, Cas|sius,
           ,       ,           ,        ,          ,
      The an|gry spot | doth glow | on Cae|sar's brow,
           ,          ,      ,            ,        ,
      And all | the rest | look like^|a chid|den train:
          ,    2     ,          ,         ,    ,
      Calpur|nia's cheek | is pale;| and Ci|cero
        ,                ,              ,   ,       ,
      Looks with | such fer|ret and / such fie|ry eyes
          ,          ,         ,        ,    ,
190   As we | have seen | him in | the Ca|pitol,
        2      ,          ,     2     ,         ,     ,
      Being crossed | in con|ference by | some sen|ators.
 
CASSIUS
       ,             ,         ,         ,       ,
      Casca | will tell | us what | the mat|ter is.
 
CAESAR
Antonius.
 
ANTONY
Caesar.
 
CAESAR
           ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      Let me | have men | about | me that | are fat;
        T     Tx    T          ,         ,           ,
      Sleek-headed men | and such | as sleep | at nights:
            ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
195   Yond Cas|sius has | a lean | and hun|gry look;
            ,           ,          ,         ,      ,
      He thinks | too much:| such men | are dan|gerous.
 
ANTONY
        T   T   T     ,         ,         ,    2
      Fear him not | Caesar;| he's not | dangerous;
          ,      ,      ,             ,    x
      He is | a no|ble Ro|man and / well given.
 
CAESAR
        ,              ,        ,        ,         ,
      Would he | were fat|ter; but | I fear | him not:
           ,        ,          ,   ,         ,
200   Yet if | my name | were li|able | to fear,
         ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      I do | not know | the man | I should | avoid
           ,                ,    ,               ,     ,
      So soon | as that / spare Cas|sius. He / reads much;
          ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      He is | a great | obser|ver and | he looks
                ,            ,         ,         ,          ,
      Quite* through | the deeds | of men:| he loves | no plays,
           ,          ,    ,        ,         ,      2->
205   As thou | dost^An|tony;| he hears | no mu||sic;
       ,     2      ,            ,          ,        ,
      Sel|dom he smiles,| and smiles | in such | a sort
          ,         ,          ,           ,             x
      As if | he mocked | himself | and scorned | his spirit
             ,          ,          ,        ,     ,
      That could | be moved | to smile | at a|nything.
            ,        ,       ,             ,      ,
      Such men | as he | be ne|ver at / heart's ease
               ,        ,        ,        ,           ,
210   Whiles^they | behold | a grea|ter than | themselves,
            ,         ,          ,     ,      ,
      And there|fore are | they ve|ry dan|gerous.
         ,        ,           ,        ,         ,
      I ra|ther tell | thee what | is to | be feared
             ,        ,         ,      ,       ,       ->
      Than what | I fear;| for al|ways I | am Cae||sar.
        ,      2     ,       ,           ,             ,
      Come | on my right | hand, for | this ear | is deaf,
            ,        ,       ,            ,          ,
215   And tell | me tru|ly what | thou thinkst | of him.
 
[Sennet. Exeunt CAESAR and all his Train, but CASCA]
 
CASCA
             ,         ,         ,          2      ,           ,
      You pulled | me by | the cloak;| would you speak | with me?
 
BRUTUS
       T   T  T     ,         ,            ,         ,  ->
      Aye Casca;| tell us | what hath | chanced to||day,
              ,         T    T  T    oo
      That | Caesar | looks so sad.|
 
CASCA
           ,           ,           ,         ,
      Why you | were with | him, were | you not?
 
BRUTUS
      <-     ,       T    T   T     ,        ,          ___
220     I should || not then ask | Casca | what had | chanced.
 
CASCA
Why, there was a crown offered him: and being offered him, he put it by with the back of his hand, thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.
 
BRUTUS
What was the second noise for?
 
CASCA
Why for that too.
 
CASSIUS
They shouted thrice: what was the last cry for?
 
CASCA
Why for that too.
 
BRUTUS
Was the crown offered him thrice?
 
CASCA
Aye marry was it, and he put it by thrice, every time gentler than other, and at every putting-by mine honest neighbours shouted.
 
CASSIUS
Who offered him the crown?
 
CASCA
Why Antony.
 
BRUTUS
Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.
 
CASCA
I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it: it was mere foolery; I did not mark it. I saw Mark Antony offer him a crown, yet 'twas not a crown neither, 'twas one of these coronets: and, as I told you, he put it by once: but, for all that, to my thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he offered it to him again; then he put it by again: but, to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it. And then he offered it the third time; he put it the third time by: and still as he refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped their chapped hands and threw up their sweaty night-caps and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because Caesar refused the crown that it had almost choked Caesar; for he swooned and fell down at it: and for mine own part, I durst not laugh, for fear of opening my lips and receiving the bad air.
 
CASSIUS
            ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      But soft | I pray | you: what | did Cae|sar swoon?
 
CASCA
He fell down in the market-place, and foamed at mouth, and was speechless.
 
BRUTUS
            ,      ,         ,         ,         ,       ->
      'Tis ve|ry like | he hath | the fal|ling sick|ness.
 
CASSIUS
       ,    ,         ,        ,          ,        _
      No,| Caesar | hath it | not; but | you and | I,
           ,       ,       ,       2     ,        ,        o
      And hon|est Cas|ca, we | have the fal|ling sick|ness.    (hex with prev)
 
CASCA
I know not what you mean by that; but, I am sure, Caesar fell down. If the tag-rag people did not clap him and hiss him, according as he pleased and displeased them, as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true man.
 
BRUTUS
             ,         ,         ,       ,        ,
225   What said | he when | he came | unto | himself?
 
CASCA
Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the common herd was glad he refused the crown, he plucked me ope his doublet and offered them his throat to cut. An I had been a man of any occupation, if I would not have taken him at a word, I would I might go to hell among the rogues. And so he fell. When he came to himself again, he said, If he had done or said anything amiss, he desired their worships to think it was his infirmity. Three or four wenches, where I stood, cried 'Alas, good soul!' and forgave him with all their hearts: but there's no heed to be taken of them; if Caesar had stabbed their mothers, they would have done no less.
 
BRUTUS
           ,       ,         ,          ,      ,
      And af|ter that,| he came | thus sad | away.
 
CASCA
       T
      Aye.
 
CASSIUS
            T   T    ,       ,     ,
           Did Ci|cero | say a|nything?
 
CASCA
       ,          ,     ,
      Aye, he | spoke Greek./
 
CASSIUS
                                          ,    oo
                             To what |effect?|
 
CASCA
Nay, and I tell you that, Ill nere look you in the face again: but those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads; but, for mine own part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too: Marullus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs off Caesar's images, are put to silence. Fare you well. There was more foolery yet, if I could remember it.
 
CASSIUS
Will you sup with me tonight, Casca?
 
CASCA
No, I am promised forth.
 
CASSIUS
Will you dine with me tomorrow?
 
CASCA
Aye, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner worth the eating.
 
CASSIUS
Good: I will expect you.
 
CASCA
Do so. Farewell, both.
 
[Exit]
 
BRUTUS
                 ,    ,             ,    ,         ,
230   What a / blunt fel|low is / this grown | to be?
                 ,    ,        ,         ,          ,
      He was / quick met|tle when | he went | to school.
 
CASSIUS
       T  T  T    ,        ,   ,
      So is he | now in | exe|cution
         ,      ,        ,      ,      ,
      Of a|ny bold | or no|ble en|terprise,
         ,            ,   ,         ,       ,
      Howe|ver he / puts on | this tar|dy form.
             ,        ,       ,                ,   ,
235   This rude|ness is | a sauce | to his / good wit,
              ,          ,        ,       ,          ,
      Which gives | men sto|mach to | digest | his words
            ,       ,     ,
      With bet|ter ap|petite.
 
BRUTUS
                                   ,       ,
                              And so | it is.
       ,          __    ,          ,         oo
      For this | time | I will | leave you:|
         ,        ,          ,          ,           ,
240   Tomor|row, if | you please | to speak | with me,
          ,           ,        ,        ,         ,
      I will | come home | to you;| or if | you will,
             ,        ,       ,          ,         ,
      Come home | to me,| and I | will wait | for you.
 
CASSIUS
                ,  ,          ,      ,              ,
      I will / do so:| till then,| think of | the world.
 
[Exit BRUTUS]
            ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      Well Bru|tus, thou | art no|ble; yet | I see,
           ,    ,      ,      ,          ,
245   Thy hon|ora|ble me|tal may | be wrought
             ,        ,        ,            ,      2     ,
      From that | it is | disposed:| therefore | it is meet
            ,       ,          ,       ,            ,
      That no|ble minds | keep^e|ver with | their likes;
           ,         ,          ,       ,       ,
      For who | so firm | that can|not be | seduced?
       ,              ,         ,       2     ,      ,
      Caesar | doth bear | me hard;| but he loves | Brutus:
         ,         ,       ,         ,         ,       ->
250   If I | were Bru|tus now | and he | were Cas||sius,
            ,          ,       ,       ,           ,
      He should | not hu|mour me.| I will | this^night,
          ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      In sev|eral hands,| in at | his win|dows throw,
          ,          ,          ,   2    ,     ,
      As if | they came | from sev|eral cit|izens,
       ,          ,   ,         2        ,      ,
      Writings | all ten/ding to the | great o|pinion
             ,      ,     2        ,          ,      ,
255   That Rome | holds of his | name; where|in ob|scurely
       ,            ,        ,          ,       ,
      Caesar's | ambi|tion shall | be glan|ced at:
           ,       ,         ,        ,          ,
      And af|ter this | let Cae|sar seat | him sure;
           ,          ,                 ,     ,        ,
      For we | will shake | him, or / worse days | endure.

[Exit]

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