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Julius Caesar

Act I, Scene 3

The same. A street.
 
[Thunder and lightning. Enter from opposite sides, CASCA, with his sword drawn, and CICERO]
 
CICERO
           ,       ,         ,           ,        ,
      Good e|ven, Cas|ca: brought | you Cae|sar home?
       ,               ,          ,          ,          ,
      Why are | you breath|less? And | why stare | you so?
 
CASCA
           ,          ,           ,          ,         ,
      Are not | you moved,| when all | the sway | of earth
        ,                ,         ,       ,    ,
      Shakes, like | a thing | unfirm?| O Ci|cero,
                 ,   ,           ,          ,         ,
5     I have / seen tem|pests, when | the scol|ding winds
             ,           ,       ,        ,          ,
      Have rived | the knot|ty oaks,| and I | have seen
         2   ,       ,        ,           ,          ,
      The ambi|tious o|cean swell | and rage | and foam,
          ,      ,       ,          ,      2      ,
      To be | exal|ted with | the threa|tening clouds:
           ,       ,        ,      ,            ,
      But ne|ver till | tonight,| never | till now,
          ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
10    Did I | go through | a tem|pest drop|ping fire.
       ,         ,           ,        ,           x
      Either | there is | a ci|vil strife | in heaven,
           ,          ,          ,       ,          ,
      Or else | the world,| too sau|cy with | the gods,
         ,        ,         ,         ,
      Incen|ses them | to send | destruc|tion.
 
CICERO
      <- ,      ,        ,     T     T   T      ,
        Why,|| saw you | any|thing more won|derful?
 
CASCA
         ,        ,           ,          ,         ,
15    A com|mon slave,| you know | him well | by sight,
            ,         ,      ,                 ,           ,
      Held^up | his left | hand, which | did flame | and burn
             ,      ,          ,          ,          ,
      Like twen|ty tor|ches joined,| and yet | his hand,
           ,     ,         ,         ,           ,
      Not sen|sible | of fire,| remained | unscorched.
          ,         ,          ,          ,        ,
      Besides,| I have | not since | put up | my sword,
          ,          ,    ,       ,        x
20    Against | the Ca|pitol | I met | a lion,
             ,       ,         ,          ,      ,
      Who glared | upon | me, and | went sur|ly by,
           ,       ,       ,         ,            ,
      Without | annoy|ing me:| and there | were drawn
        ,        ,       ,         ,       ,     ->
      Upon | a heap | a hun|dred ghast|ly wo||men,
        ,      ,                  ,          ,           ,
      Trans|formed with | their fear;| who swore | they saw
           ,         ,          ,         ,           ,
25    Men^all | in fire | walk^up | and down | the streets.
           ,      ,          ,         ,          ,
      And yes|terday | the bird | of night | did sit
        T   .   T   T      ,         ,        ,
      Eene at noon-day | upon | the mar|ket-place,
        ,             ,           ,           ,     ,
      Hooting | and shrie|king. When | these pro|digies
          ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      Do so | conjoint|ly meet,| let not | men say
        ,                ,          ,         ,    ,
30    These are | their rea|sons, they | are na|tural:
          ,       ,           ,        ,          ,
      For I | believe,| they are | porten|tous things
         ,        ,         ,           ,       ,
      Unto | the cli|mate that | they point | upon.
 
CICERO
          ,        ,        ,         ,       ,
      Indeed,| it is | a strange-|dispo|sed time:
           ,       2     ,        ,    ,              ,
      But men | may construe | things af/ter their | fashion,
        ,               ,        ,          ,            ,
35    Clean from | the pur|pose of | the things | themselves.
            ,       ,        ,    ,       ,       2->
      Come Cae|sar to | the Cap|itol | tomor||row?
 
CASCA
           ,         ,        ,       ,   ,
      He doth;| for he | did bid | Anto|nius
             ,        ,         ,          ,        ,       2->
      Send^word | to you | he would | be there | tomor||row.
 
CICERO
             ,            ,        ,        ,       ,
      Good night | then, Cas|ca: this | distur|bed sky
          ,         ,       
40    Is not | to walk | in.
 
CASCA
                                     ,    ,    ,
                              Fare/well, Ci|cero.
 
[Exit CICERO. Enter CASSIUS]
 
CASSIUS
              ,
      Who's there?
 
CASCA
                      ,
                   A Ro|man.
 
CASSIUS
                              ,       ,          ,
                             Cas|ca, by | your voice.
 
CASCA
            ,         ,     ,               ,          ,
      Your ear | is good.| Cassius,| what night | is this?
 
CASSIUS
         ,      ,         ,         ,       ,
      A ve|ry plea|sing night | to ho|nest men.
 
CASCA
          ,       ,         ,        ,       ,
45    Who e|ver knew | the hea|vens me|nace so?
 
CASSIUS
        ,                 ,           ,          ,          ,
      Those that | have known | the earth | so full | of faults.
           ,     ,               ,        ,           ,
      For my | part, I | have walked | about | the streets,
          ,        ,      ,        ,    2     ,
      Submit|ting me | unto | the per|ilous night,
            ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      And thus | unbrac|ed, Cas|ca, as | you see,
             ,         ,      ,         ,        ,
50    Have bared | my bo|som to | the thun|der-stone;
       ,      2        T     T    T           ,        ,     2->
      And when the | cross blue light|ning seemed | to o||pen
             ,           x        ,         ,        ,
      The breast | of heaven,| I did | present | myself
      ,        2     ,         ,      ,         ,
      Even | in the aim | and ve|ry flash | of it.
 
CASCA
            ,         ,         ,          ,            x
      But where|fore did | you so | much tempt | the heavens?
       ,   2        ,        ,         ,          ,     
55    It is the | part of | men to | fear and | tremble,
                   ,    ,       ,        ,        ,
      When the / most migh|ty gods | by to|kens send
             ,        ,        ,     ,        ,
      Such dread|ful her|alds to | asto|nish us.
 
CASSIUS
                  ,    ,              ,      ,          ,
      You are / dull, Cas|ca: and / those sparks | of life
              ,         ,      ,      ,         ,
      That should | be in | a Ro|man you | do want,
           ,         ,          ,           ,          ,
60    Or else | you use | not. You | look pale | and gaze
           ,         ,          ,          ,        ,      2->
      And put | on fear | and cast | yourself | in won||der
          ,           ,         ,         ,          x
      To see | the strange | impa|tience of | the heavens:
           ,         ,         ,             ,    ,
      But if | you would | consi|der the / true cause
           ,            ,          ,           ,          ,
      Why all | these fires,| why all | these gli|ding ghosts,
            ,            ,           ,     ,         ,
65    Why birds | and beasts | from qua|lity | and kind,
           ,           ,          ,        ,      ,
      Why old | men* fool | and chil|dren cal|culate,
           ,             ,        ,                 ,     ,
      Why all | these things | change from | their or|dinance
             ,              ,  ,       ,      ,
      Their na|tures and / prefor|med fac|ulties
          ,          ,     ,        ,            ,
      To mon|strous qua|lity;| why you | shall find
            ,        ,        ,            ,             x
70    That hea|ven hath | infused | them with | these spirits,
           ,          ,       ,          ,         ,       ->
      To make | them in|struments | of fear | and war||ning
       ,      ,     ,           ___    oo
      Un|to some | monstrous | state.|
            ,         ,        ,         ,       ,
      Now could | I (Cas|ca) name | to thee | a man
        T    T    T      ,         ___    oo
      Most like this | dreadful | night,|
             ,          ,        ,         ,           ,
75    That thun|ders, ligh|tens, o|pens graves,| and roars
           ,         ,     ,        ,    ,
      As doth | the li|on in | the Ca|pitol,
         ,         ,    2    ,         ,        ,
      A man | no migh|tier than | thyself | or me
          ,    2    ,        ,        ,         ,
      In per|sonal ac|tion, yet | prodi|gious grown
            ,        ,            ,        ,         ,
      And fear|ful, as | these strange | erup|tions are.
 
CASCA
            ,        ,          ,      2    ,     ,
80    'Tis Cae|sar that | you mean;| is it not,| Cassius?
 
CASSIUS
       ,        ,           ,        ,       ,
      Let it | be who | it is:| for Ro|mans now
             ,           ,       ,              ,  ,
      Have thews | and limbs | like to | their an|cestors;
           ,          ,          ,          ,           ,
      But woe | the while,| our fa|thers' minds | are dead,
           ,        ,          ,         ,           x
      And we | are go|verned with | our mo|thers' spirits;
            ,         ,     2      ,        ,     ,
85    Our yoke | and suf|ferance show | us wo|manish.
 
CASCA
          ,          ,         ,     ,       ,      2->
      Indeed,| they say,| the sen|ators | tomor||row
        ,      2   ,        ,       ,       ,
      Mean | to esta|blish Cae|sar as | a king;
           ,           ,          ,         ,          ,
      And he | shall wear | his crown | by sea | and land,
         ,        ,            ,       ,    ,
      In e|very place,| save^here | in I|taly.
 
CASSIUS
          ,          ,          ,          ,        ,
90    I know | where I | will wear | this dag|ger then;
       ,          ,   ,           2    ,       ,
      Cassius | from bon/dage will de|liver | Cassius:
            ,        ,          ,          ,            ,
      Therein,| ye gods,| you make | the weak | most^strong;
            ,        ,         ,        ,       ,
      Therein,| ye gods,| you ty|rants do | defeat:
           ,       ,           ,         ,        ,
      Nor sto|ny tower,| nor walls | of bea|ten brass,
           ,        ,                 ,     ,          ,
95    Nor air|less dun|geon, nor / strong links | of iron,
           ,      ,        ,           ,            x
      Can be | reten|tive to | the strength | of spirit;
            ,      2    ,      ,           ,        ,
      But life | being wea|ry of | these world|ly bars,
       ,        ,    ,               ,        ,
      Never | lacks pow/er to | dismiss | itself.
         ,          ,          ,          ,         ,
      If I | know this,| know all | the world | besides,
             ,        ,     ,        ,        ,
100   That part | of ty|ranny | that I | do bear
         ,           ,         ,
      I can | shake^off | at plea|sure.
 
[Thunder still]
 
CASCA
                                        ,       ,
                                       So | can I:
         ,        ,                 ,    ,    ,
      So e|very bond|man in his // own hand bears
            ,         ,       ,        ,    ,
      The power | to can|cel his | capti|vity.
 
CASSIUS
           ,            ,       ,      ,        ,
105   And why | should Cae|sar be | a ty|rant then?
        T   T   T     ,    2         ,           ,
      Poor man, I | know he would | not be | a wolf,
            ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
      But that | he sees | the Ro|mans are | but sheep:
           ,        ,             ,   ,        ,
      He were | no li|on, were / not Ro|mans hinds.
              ,           ,            ,        ,       ,
      Those^that | with haste | will make | a migh|ty fire
         ,                ,     ,            ,          ,
110   Begin | it with / weak straws:| what trash | is Rome,
            ,                ,   ,        ,          ,
      What rub|bish, and / what of|fal? When | it serves
                  ,   ,       ,      ,     ,
      For the / base mat|ter to | illu|minate
           ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      So vile | a thing | as Cae|sar. But | O grief,
              ,          ,        ,       ,       ,
      Where hast | thou led | me? I |(perhaps)| speak this
          ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
115   Before | a wil|ling bond|man; then | I know
          ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      My an|swer must | be made.| But I | am armed,
           ,        ,        ,      ,      ,
      And dan|gers are | to me | indif|ferent.
 
CASCA
            ,         ,       ,         ,       ,
      You speak | to Cas|ca, and | to such | a man
        ,    2       ,          T    T     T         ,
      That is no | fleering | tell-tale. Hold,| my hand:
          ,         ,        ,         ,             ,
120   Be fac|tious for | redress | of all | these griefs,
          ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      And I | will set | this foot | of mine | as far
          ,          ,
      As who | goes far|thest.
 
CASSIUS
                                 ,         ,         ,
                              There's | a bar|gain made.
       T    T   T     ,       2       ,        ,     2->
      Now know you,| Casca,| I have moved | alrea||dy
            ,        ,        ,        ,       ,      2->
125   Some cer|tain of | the no|blest-min|ded Ro||mans
          ,     ,         ,       ,      ,
      To un|dergo | with me | an en|terprise
          ,    ,      ,     2    ,       ,
      Of ho|nora|ble-dan|gerous con|sequence;
          ,        ,         ,           ,         ,
      And I | do know | by this,| they stay | for me
          ,          ,          ,           ,        ,
      In Pom|pey's porch:| for now | this fear|ful night,
             ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
130   There is | no stir | or wal|king in | the streets;
       ,            ,        ,        ,    ,
      And the | comple|xion of | the el|ement
          ,         ,          ,         ,         ,
      In fa|vor's like | the work | we have | in hand,
             ,       ,              ,   ,     ,
      Most bloo|dy, fie|ry, and / most ter|rible.
 
CASCA
        T     T   .  T           ,           ,         ,
      Stand close awhile,| for here | comes^one | in haste.
 
CASSIUS
            ,      ,        ,         ,         ,
135   'Tis Cin|na; I | do know | him by | his gait;
          ,        ,      ,               ,          ,
      He is | a friend.| Cinna,| where* haste | you so?
 
[Enter CINNA]
 
CINNA
           ,         ,            ,      ,       ,       ->
      To find | out you.| Who's that, Metel|lus Cim||ber?
 
CASSIUS
       ,     2    ,       ,       ,      ,
      No,| it is Cas|ca; one | incor|porate
          ,         ,      ,  2         ,          ,
      To our | attempts.| Am I not | stayed for,| Cinna?
 
CINNA
       2     ,      2      ,        ,        ,          ,
140   I am glad | on it. What | a fear|ful night | is this?
               ,         ,                     ,     ,       ,
      There's two | or three | of us have // seen strange sights.
 
CASSIUS
       ,  2         ,           ,
      Am I not | stayed for?| Tell me.
 
CINNA
       ,          ,        ,
      Yes, you | are. O | Cassius,
       ,         ,          ,         ,       ,
      If you | could but | win the | noble | Brutus
       ,        ,
145   To our | party--  (cut off)
 
CASSIUS
       ,    2      ,           ,        ,          ,
      Be you con|tent. Good*| Cinna,| take this | paper,
            ,         ,        ,         ,          ,
      And look | you lay | it in | the prae|tor's chair,
             ,       ,          ,                ,     ,
      Where Bru|tus may | but find | it; and / throw this
       ,           ,        ,          ,         ,
      In at | his win|dow; set | this up | with wax
        ,         ,        ,        ,           ,
150   Upon | old^Bru|tus' sta|tue: all | this done,
          ,        ,          ,            ,              x
      Repair | to Pom|pey's porch,| where you | shall find us.
          ,       ,       ,        ,  2     ,
      Is De|cius Bru|tus and | Trebo|nius there?
 
CINNA
       ,           ,       ,               ,    ,
      All but | Metel|lus Cim|ber; and / he's gone
           ,         ,          ,       ,    2        ,
      To seek | you at | your house.| Well, I will | hie,
      <-        ,      ,           ,        ,         ,
155     And || so be|stow these | papers | as you | bade me.
 
CASSIUS
        T    T    .  T        ,         ,    ,
      That done, repair | to Pom|pey's the|ater.
 
[Exit CINNA]
        ,   ,                ,         ,         ,
      Come Cas/ca, you | and I | will yet | ere day
           ,       ,         ,       ,     ,
      See Bru|tus at | his house:| three parts / of him
           ,       ,       ,         ,        ,
      Is ours | alrea|dy, and | the man | entire
        ,          ,        ,         ,           ,
160   Upon | the next | encoun|ter yields | him ours.
 
CASCA
      ,         ,    ,                  ,           ,
      O, he | sits high / in all | the peo|ple's hearts:
            ,            ,         ,        ,         ,
      And that | which would | appear | offence | in us,
            ,      ,           ,        ,     ,
      His coun|tenance,| like ri|chest al|chemy,
              ,         ,       ,        ,       ,
      Will change | to vir|tue and | to wor|thiness.
 
CASSIUS
       ,              ,                 ,     ,        ,
165   Him and | his worth | and our / great need | of him
                   ,     ,        ,        ,        ,
      You have / right well | concei|ted. Let | us go,
           ,       ,      ,                ,   ,
      For it | is af|ter mid|night, and / ere day,
       ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      We will | awake | him and | be sure | of him.
 
[Exeunt]

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