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Julius Caesar

Act III, Scene 2

The Forum.
 
[Enter BRUTUS and CASSIUS, and a throng of Citizens]
 
CITIZENS
       ,            ,      ,     ,           ,       ,  ->
      We will | be sat|isfied;| let us | be sat||isfied.
 
BRUTUS
            ,       ,         ,        ,    2       ,    ->
      Then fol|low me,| and give | me au||dience friends.
       ,            ,     ,         ,          ,   ->
      Cassius | go you | into | the o||ther street,
            ,         ,
      And part | the num|bers:  \\
       ,       2         T   T   T                 ,    ,
5     Those that will | hear me speak,| let 'em / stay here;
        ,                ,       ,         ,         ,
      Those that | will fol|low Cas|sius, go | with him;
           ,       ,         ,     T   T   T
      And pub|lic rea|sons shall | be rendered
          ,          ,
      Of Cae|sar's death.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
                            ,              ,        ,
                            I will | hear Bru|tus speak.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
      ,          ,   ,    2             ,           ,         ->
10    I will | hear Cas/sius; and | compare | their rea||sons,
        ,     ,    2   ,        ,          ,
      When | sev|eral|ly we | hear them | rendered.
 
[CASSIUS, with some of the Citizens. BRUTUS goes into the pulpit]
 
THIRD CITIZEN
           ,      ,     3  3   ,        ,        o
      The no|ble Bru|tus is ascen|ded: si|lence.
 
BRUTUS
Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: --Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honor him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honor for his valor; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
 
ALL
None, Brutus, none.
 
BRUTUS
Then none have I offended. I have done no more to Caesar than you shall do to Brutus. The question of his death is enrolled in the Capitol; his glory not extenuated, wherein he was worthy, nor his offences enforced, for which he suffered death.  Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony: who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth; as which of you shall not? With this I depart,--that, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.
 
ALL
       __    ___ ___    __     __
      Live | Bru|tus,| live,| live.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
        ,               ,         ,       ,         ,
      Bring him | with tri|umph home | unto | his house.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
        ,           ,        ,         ,  ,
15    Give him | a sta|tue with | his an|cestors.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
       ,     2      ,
      Let him be | Caesar.  (pickup)
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
       ,          ,         ,        2        ,          ,
      Caesar's | better | parts shall be | crowned in | Brutus.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
              ,          ,         ,
      We'll bring | him to | his house  (picked up)
              ,          ,
      With shouts | and cla|mors.
 
BRUTUS
                                     ,     T  T  T
20                                  My | countrymen.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
       ___     ,         ,          T
      Peace,| silence,| Brutus | speaks.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
                                     T    T
                                   Peace ho.
 
BRUTUS
             ,      ,     ,           ,       ,
      Good coun|trymen,| let me | depart | alone,
                  ,   ,            ,          ,    ,
      And (for / my sake)| stay* here | with An|tony:
           ,         ,           ,           ,            ,
25    Do grace | to Cae|sar's corpse,| and grace | his speech
       ,     2      ,          ,                      ,  x
      Tending to | Caesar's | glories;| which Mark / Antony
           ,        ,         ,       ,          ,
      (By our | permis|sion) is | allowed | to make.
         ,       ,           ,       ,        ,
      I do | entreat | you, not | a man | depart,
           ,      ,          ,    ,          ,
      Save^I | alone,| till An|tony | have spoke.
 
[Exit]
 
FIRST CITIZEN
             ,        ,         ,          ,    ,
30    Stay* ho,| and let | us hear | Mark^An|tony.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
           ,        ,      ,        ,        ,
      Let him | go up | into | the pub|lic chair;
              ,          ,      ,    ,       ,
      We'll hear | him: no|ble An|tony | go up.
 
ANTONY
           ,         ,    ,   2    ,         ,
      For Bru|tus' sake,| I am be|holding | to you.
 
[Goes into the pulpit]
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
        ,      2      ,        ,
      What does he | say of | Brutus?
 
THIRD CITIZEN
           ,         ,         ,
35    He says,| for Bru|tus' sake  (tri with prev)
           ,          ,       ,        ,       ,
      He finds | himself | behol|ding to | us all.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
               ,         ,          ,        ,        ,
      'Twere best | he speak | no harm | of Bru|tus here.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
            ,       ,       ,
      This Cae|sar was | a ty|rant.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
                                   ,            ,        ->
                                  Nay | that's cer||tain:
       ,         ,            ,        ,        ,
40    We | are blest | that Rome | is rid | of him.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
        ,               ,          ,    ,        ,
      Peace, let | us hear | what An|tony | can say.
 
ANTONY
           ,       ,
      You gen|tle Ro|mans.
 
CITIZENS
                            ,      ,     2       ,
                          Peace | ho, let us | hear him.
 
ANTONY
        ___      ,         ,   2        ,    2         ,
      Friends,| Romans,| countrymen,| lend me your | ears;
      <-        ,        ,      ,        ,          ,
45       I || come to | bury | Caesar,| not to | praise him:
          ,             ,   ,          ,       ,
      The e|vil that / men do | lives^af|ter them;
            ,        ,       ,        ,            ,
      The good | is oft | inter|red with | their bones;
       ,    2      ,         ,            ,      ,      2->
      So let it | be with | Caesar.| The no|ble Bru||tus
             ,         ,       ,       ,       o
      Hath told | you Cae|sar was | ambi|tious:
       ,            ,    ,           ,         ,
50    If it | were so,| it was | a grie|vous fault,
            ,       ,         ,       ,         ,
      And grie|vously | hath Cae|sar an|swered it.
        ,            ,         ,       ,          ,
      Here, un|der leave | of Bru|tus and | the rest
            ,       ,       ,    ,      ,
      (For Bru|tus is | an hon|ora|ble man;
          ,          ,     ,   ,           ,
      So are | they all;| all hon/ora|ble men)
           ,        ,         ,         ,    ,
55    Come^I | to speak | in Cae|sar's fu|neral.
       ,             ,       ,              ,        ,
      He was | my friend,| faithful,| and just | to me:
           ,        ,        ,       ,        o
      But Bru|tus says | he was | ambi|tious;
           ,       ,       ,    ,      ,
      And Bru|tus is | an ho|nora|ble man.
                   ,     ,     ,          ,         ,
      He hath / brought ma|ny cap|tives home | to Rome
             ,        ,         ,   2    ,         ,
60    Whose^ran|soms did | the gen|eral cof|fers fill:
            ,        ,        ,       ,        o
      Did this | in Cae|sar seem | ambi|tious?
        ,               ,           ,      ,              ,
      When that | the poor | have cried,| Caesar | hath wept:
         ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      Ambi|tion should | be made | of ster|ner stuff:
           ,        ,        ,       ,        o
      Yet Bru|tus says | he was | ambi|tious;
           ,       ,       ,    ,      ,
65    And Bru|tus is | an hon|ora|ble man.
           ,         ,          ,        ,     ,
      You all | did see | that on | the Lu|percal
           ,         ,       ,        ,       ,
      I thrice | presen|ted him | a king|ly crown,
             ,          ,         ,          ,       ,       ->
      Which he | did thrice | refuse:| was this | ambi||tion?
       ,     ,         ,        ,      ,
      Yet | Brutus | says he | was am|bitious;
            ,     ,          ,    ,      ,
70    And sure | he is | an hon|ora|ble man.
          ,      ,            ,           ,        ,
      I speak | not to | disprove | what Bru|tus spoke,
            ,       ,        ,          ,        ,
      But here | I am | to speak | what I | do know.
           ,          ,          ,     ,             ,
      You all | did love | him once,| not with|out cause:
             ,           ,           ,         ,          ,
      What cause | withholds | you then,| to mourn | for him?
          ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
75    O judg|ment! Thou | art fled | to bru|tish beasts,
           ,           ,           ,         ,          ,
      And men | have lost | their rea|son. Bear | with me;
           ,         ,          x       ,           ,
      My heart | is in | the coffin | there with | Caesar,
          ,          ,       ,              ,        ,
      And I | must pause | till it | come^back | to me.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
           ,          2     ,     ,        ,        ,
      Methinks | there is much | reason | in his | sayings.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
           ,        ,       ,       ,          x
80    If thou | consi|der right|ly of | the matter,
       ,    2       T    T     T
      Caesar has | had great wrong.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
                                     ,        ,
                                    Has he | masters?
          ,            ,        ,       ,             ,
      I fear | there will | a worse | come in | his place.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
         ,              ,          ,           ,          ,
      Marked ye | his words?| He would | not take | the crown;
             ,         ,        ,        ,       ,        ->
85    Therefore |'tis cer|tain he | was not | ambi||tious.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
       ,     2     ,           ,           ,         x
      If | it be found | so, some | will dear | abide it.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
              ,          ,         ,         ,           ,      o
      Poor* soul,| his eyes | are red | as fire | with wee|ping.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
               ,       ,       ,         ,          ,    ,
      There's not | a no|bler man | in Rome | than An|tony.  (hex with prev)
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
            ,          ,       ,       ,         ,
      Now mark | him, he | begins | again | to speak.
 
ANTONY
           ,      ,          ,        ,        ,
90    But yes|terday | the word | of Cae|sar might
             ,         ,           ,           ,         ,
      Have stood | against | the world:| now lies | he there,
            ,         ,        ,        ,     ,
      And none | so poor | to do | him re|verence.
         ,         ,       ,         ,          ,
      O mas|ters! If | I were | disposed | to stir
              ,           ,         ,    ,         ,
      Your hearts | and minds | to mu|tiny | and rage,
           ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
95    I should | do Bru|tus wrong,| and Cas|sius wrong:
       T    T   T      ,          , 2        ,
      Who (you all | know) are | honora|ble men:
          ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      I will | not do | them wrong;| I ra|ther choose
           ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      To wrong | the dead,| to wrong | myself | and you,
           ,          ,           ,    ,      ,
      Than I | will wrong | such^hon|ora|ble men.
            ,          ,       3    3      ,        ,       o
100   But here's | a parch|ment with the seal | of Cae|sar;
          ,         ,        ,         ,          ,
      I found | it in | his clo|set, 'tis | his will:
       ,             ,         ,          ,      ,
      Let but | the com|mons hear | this tes|tament:
              ,       ,      ,         ,         ,
      (Which par|don me)| I do | not mean | to read,
       ,      2         ,         T    T   T           ,
      And they would | go and | kiss dead Cae|sar's wounds
           ,           ,        ,        ,        ,
105   And dip | their nap|kins in | his sa|cred blood,
       T    T  .   T        ,         ,    ,
      Yea, beg a hair | of him | for me|mory,
           ,       ,        ,       ,            ,
      And dy|ing, men|tion it | within | their wills,
          ,         ,            ,   ,    ,
      Bequea|thing it | as a / rich leg|acy
         ,          ,
      Unto | their is|sue.  \\
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
             ,           ,      ,             ,    ,
110   We'll hear | the will,| read it | Mark^An|tony.
 
ALL
            ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
      The will,| the will:| we will | hear Cae|sar's will.
 
ANTONY
            ,         ,         ,       2      ,      ,
      Have pa|tience gen|tle friends,| I must not | read it;
        2    ,      ,          ,         ,         ,
      It is not | meet you | know how | Caesar | loved you.
        ,             ,         ,           ,          ,
      You are | not wood,| you are | not stones,| but men;
           ,      ,      ,    2        ,        ,
115   And be|ing men,| hearing the | will of | Caesar,
       ,            ,           ,          ,         ,
      It will | inflame | you, it | will make | you mad:
             ,          ,     ,          ,              ,
      'Tis good | you know | not that | you are | his heirs;
           ,          ,     ,                ,        ,
      For if | you should,| O what | would come | of it?
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
        ,          T     T    T         ,    ,
      Read the | will; we'll hear | it An|tony;
        ,           ,             ,     ,          __
120   You shall | read us | the will,| Caesar's | will.
 
ANTONY
        ,            ,          ,          ,        ,
      Will you | be pa|tient? Will | you stay | awhile?
       2      ,    ,       ,         ,         ,
      I have ore|shot my|self to | tell you | of it:
          ,        ,          ,    ,      ,
      I fear | I wrong | the hon|ora|ble men
             ,      2        ,       ,       T  T   T   .
      Whose dag|gers have stabbed | Caesar;| I do fear it.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
        ,           ,         ,    ,      ___
125   They were | traitors:| hono|rable | men?
 
ALL
            ,         ,      ,
      The will,| the tes|tament.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
                                   ,          ,        
                                 They were | villains,
       ,      ,          __      ,         __
      Murde|rers: the | will,| read the | will.
 
ANTONY
            ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      You will | compel | me then | to read | the will:
             ,        ,       ,           ,         ,       2->
130   Then make | a ring | about | the corpse | of Cae||sar,
           ,         ,         ,           ,          ,
      And let | me show | you him | that made | the will.
            ,       ,           ,          ,         ,
      Shall I | descend?| And will | you give | me leave?
 
Several CITIZENS
             ,
      Come^down.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
                    ,
                Descend.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
                                      ,     ,
                        You shall / have leave.
 
[ANTONY comes down]
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
      <-    ,       T     T
        A ring;|| stand round.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
                                T                 ,       ,       2       ,
135                           Stand | from the hearse,| stand from the | body.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
        ,         ,    ,         ,       ,  2
      Room for | Anto|ny, most^|noble | Antony.
 
ANTONY
            ,          ,     ,          ,          ,
      Nay press | not so | upon | me; stand | far off.
 
SEVERAL CITIZENS
        T     T     T     __     __    oo
      Stand back; room,| bear | back.|
 
ANTONY
          ,           ,          ,         ,          ,
      If you | have tears,| prepare | to shed | them now.
           ,         ,          ,       ,      ,      ->
140   You all | do know | this man|tle: I | remem||ber
              ,     ,    ,       ,          2    ,
      The / first time | ever | Caesar | put it on;
             ,      ,         ,        ,         ,
      'Twas on | a sum|mer's eve|ning in | his tent,
            ,       ,      ,         ,    ,
      That day | he o|vercame | the Ner|vii:
        ,               ,          ,         ,         ,
      Look, in | this place | ran Cas|sius' dag|ger through:
       ,             ,         ,   2    ,       ,
145   See what | a rent | the en|vious Cas|ca made:
                ,          ,      ,      ,         ,
      Through this | the well-|belo|ved Bru|tus stabbed;
           ,         ,           ,        ,       ,
      And as | he plucked | his cur|sed steel | away,
        ,              ,         ,       ,         ,
      Mark how | the blood | of Cae|sar fol|lowed it,
           ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
      As rush|ing out | of doors,| to be | resolved
          ,       ,       ,        ,          ,
150   If Bru|tus so | unkind|ly knocked,| or no;
           ,        ,         ,         ,         ,      ->
      For Bru|tus, as | you know,| was Cae|sar's an||gel:
        ,      2      ,          ,      ,        ,          ->
      Judge,| O you gods,| how dear|ly Cae|sar loved || him.
        ,       2      ,       ,        ,        ,
      This | was the most | unkin|dest cut | of all;
            ,         ,      ,       ,          ,
      For when | the no|ble Cae|sar saw | him stab,
         ,      ,             ,            ,          ,
155   Ingra|titude,| more* strong | than trai|tors' arms,
        ,    ,                       ,           ,       ,
      Quite van/quished him:| then burst | his migh|ty heart;
           ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      And in | his man|tle, muf|fling up | his face,
      ,        2      ,        ,         ,    ,
      Even | at the base | of Pom|pey's sta|tua,
             ,          ,            ,            ,        ,
      Which all | the while | ran* blood,| great^Cae|sar fell.
          ,        ,          ,          ,      ,
160   O what | a fall | was there,| my coun|trymen?
           ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      Then I,| and you,| and all | of us | fell^down,
               ,       ,        ,         ,      ,
      Whilst blood|y trea|son flour|ished o|ver us.
         ,          ,        ,        ,           ,
      O now | you weep;| and I | perceive | you feel
            ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      The dint | of pi|ty: these | are gra|cious drops.
        T    T      T      ,            2     ,        ,
165   Kind souls, what | weep you,| when you but | behold
           ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      Our Cae|sar's ves|ture woun|ded? Look | you here,
        ,            ,       ,     2       ,           ,
      Here is | himself,| marred as you | see with | traitors.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
         ,   2     ,     ,
      O pit|eous spec|tacle!
 
SECOND CITIZEN
                               ,      ,       2->
                            O no|ble Cae||sar!
 
THIRD CITIZEN
         ,       ,
170   O woe|ful day!
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
                         ,         ,
                     O trai|tors, vil|lains!
 
FIRST CITIZEN
      <- ,           ,       ,
         O || most^bloo|dy sight!
 
SECOND CITIZEN
                                      ,      2     ,
                                 We will | be revenged.
 
ALL
      <-    ,         ,      T     T     T     T     T
        Revenge || about,| seek, burn, fire,| kill, slay,
      <- T      ,        ,         T
175     Let || not a | traitor | live.
 
ANTONY
                                        T    T      ,
                                      Stay coun|trymen.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
        T     T      T         ,      ,    ,
      Peace there, hear | the no|ble An|tony.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
              ,        2       ,       ,           ,          ,
      We'll hear | him, we'll fol|low him,| we'll die | with him.
 
ANTONY
              ,        T      T      T      2      ,         ,
      Good friends,| sweet friends, let | me not stir | you up
           ,       ,        ,         ,    ,
180   To such | a sud|den flood | of mu|tiny.
        ,                ,           ,         ,   2  ,
      They that | have done | this deed | are ho|norable:
            ,          ,            ,      ,        ,       2->
      What pri|vate griefs | they have,| alas | I know | not,
             ,           x         2      ,         ,  2   ,
      That made | them do it:| they are wise | and ho|norable,
            ,         ,           ,        ,       ,
      And will | no doubt | with rea|sons an|swer you.
          ,            ,           ,       ,            ,
185   I come | not (friends)| to steal | away | your hearts:
              ,  ,   ,        ,       ,
      I am / no or|ator,| as Bru|tus is;
       ,     2        ,        ,         T     T    T
      But (as you | know me | all) a | plain blunt man,
             ,          ,           ,           ,           ,
      That love | my friend;| and that | they know | full well
             ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      That gave | me pub|lic leave | to speak | of him:
          ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
190   For I | have nei|ther writ | nor words,| nor worth,
       ,            ,    2      ,         ,    2      ,
      Action,| nor ut|terance, nor | the po|wer of speech,
           ,            ,        ,      ,            ,
      To stir | men's^blood:| I on|ly speak | right^on;
          ,          ,           ,           ,          ,
      I tell | you that | which you | yourselves | do know;
        ,     2          ,            T      T    T            ,
      Show you sweet* | Caesar's | wounds, poor poor | dumb^mouths
           ,           ,          ,    ,      2     ,
195   And bid | them speak | for me:| but were I | Brutus,
           ,       ,    ,     ,       2      , 2
      And Bru|tus An|tony,| there were an | Antony
             ,       ,         ,      2     ,         ,
      Would ruf|fle up | your spi|rits and put | a tongue
          ,       ,         ,        ,             ,
      In ev|ery wound | of Cae|sar that | should move
             ,          ,         ,         ,    ,
      The stones | of Rome | to rise | and mu|tiny.
 
ALL
             ,    ,
200   We'll mu|tiny.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
                            ,          ,         ,      2->
                    We'll burn | the house | of Bru||tus.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
        ,            ,      ,            ,      ,
      Away | then, come,| seek the | conspi|rators.
 
ANTONY
            ,         ,      ,          ,         ,
      Yet hear | me coun|trymen,| yet hear | me speak.
 
ALL
             ,         ,    ,         ,      ,    3 3->
      Peace^ho,| hear An|tony,| most no|ble An||tony.
 
ANTONY
             ,           ,       ,         ,          ,
205   Why friends,| you go | to do | you know | not what:
            ,         ,        ,         ,            ,
      Wherein | hath Cae|sar thus | deserved | your loves?
        ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
      Alas | you know | not: I | must tell | you then:
            ,        ,          ,        ,         ,
      You have | forgot | the will | I told | you of.
 
ALL
             ,         ,             ,          ,          ,
      Most^true,| the will,| let's stay | and hear | the will.
 
ANTONY
        ,             ,         ,      ,          ,
210   Here is | the will,| and un|der Cae|sar's seal:
          ,      ,      ,    ,         ,
      To ev|ery Ro|man cit|izen | he gives,
          ,      ,        ,     ,         ,       ,      ->
      To ev|ery sev|eral man,| seven|ty-five || drachmas.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
             x      ,            2    ,           ,
      Most^noble | Caesar,| we'll revenge | his death.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
         ,      ,
      O roy|al Cae|sar.
 
ANTONY
                         ,      2      ,       2
215                    Hear | me with pa|tience.
 
ALL
                                                       ,
                                                Peace^ho.
 
ANTONY
          ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      Moreo|ver, he | hath left | you all | his walks,
           ,        ,     2     ,     ,        ,
      His pri|vate ar|bors and new-|planted | orchards,
           ,          ,       ,          ,          ,
      On this | side^Ti|ber; he | hath left | them you,
       ,    2         ,       ,       ,         ,
      And to your | heirs fo|rever,| common | pleasures
           ,       ,          ,     ,          ,
220   To walk | abroad,| and re|create | yourselves.
        ,     2     ,         ,           ,     ,
      Here was a | Caesar:| when comes^|such a|nother?
 
FIRST CITIZEN
       ,       ,       __      ,      ,
      Never,| never:| Come,| away,| away:
              ,         ,     ,        ,      ,
      We'll burn | his bod|y in | the ho|ly place,
       ,               ,        ,          ,         ,
      And with | the brands | fire the | traitors'| houses.
            ,        ,
225   Take^up | the bo|dy.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
                           ,     T     T
                          Go | fetch fire.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
                                             T            ,      ->
                                           Pluck || down^ben|ches.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
        ,             ,      ,         ,   2
      Pluck | down* forms,| windows,| anything.
 
[Exeunt Citizens with the body]
 
ANTONY
       ,             ,     ,               ,       ,
      Now let | it work:| mischief | thou art | afoot,
        ,                 ,            ,         ,     ,
230   Take thou | what course | thou wilt.| How now | fellow?
 
[Enter a Servant]
 
SERVANT
       ,       ,  2        ,   2     ,         ,
      Sir, Oc|tavius | is al|ready come | to Rome.
 
ANTONY
        ,     2
      Where is he?
 
SERVANT
                      ,        ,  2        2    ,          ,
                     He and | Lepidus | are at Cae|sar's house.
 
ANTONY
           ,         ,          ,          ,      ,
      And thi|ther will | I straight | to vi|sit him:
           ,       ,        ,     ,     2      ,
235   He comes | upon | a wish.| Fortune is | merry,
           ,          ,           ,       ,     ,
      And in | this mood | will give | us a|nything.
 
SERVANT
          ,          ,     ,       ,     ,
      I heard | him say,| Bru|tus and | Cassius
           ,          ,         ,            ,          ,
      Are rid | like mad|men through | the gates | of Rome.
 
ANTONY
          ,          ,          ,       ,        ,       ->
      Belike | they had | some no|tice of | the peo||ple,
       ,     2      ,             ,      ,   2    ,  2
240   How | I had moved | them. Bring | me to Oc|tavius.
 
[Exeunt]

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