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Julius Caesar

Act III, Scene 1

Rome. Before the Capitol; the Senate sitting above.
 
[A crowd of people; among them ARTEMIDORUS and the Soothsayer. Flourish. Enter CAESAR, BRUTUS, CASSIUS, CASCA, DECIUS BRUTUS, METELLUS CIMBER, TREBONIUS, CINNA, ANTONY, LEPIDUS, POPILIUS, PUBLIUS, and others]
 
CAESAR [To the Soothsayer]
            ,         ,           ,
      The ides | of March | are come.
 
SOOTHSAYER
      <- ,   ,               T    T
        Aye Cae/sar; but || not gone.
 
ARTEMIDORUS
                                        T     ,         ,           ,
                                      Hail | Caesar;| read this | schedule.
 
DECIUS BRUTUS
          ,  2     ,        ,              ,   ,
      Trebo|nius doth | desire | you to / oreread,
        .   T    T   T          ,         ,        ,
5     (At your best lei|sure) this | his hum|ble suit.
 
ARTEMIDORUS
         ,               ,    ,           ,          ,
      O Cae|sar, read^/mine first;| for mine's | a suit
            ,        ,        ,        ,      2       ,      2->
      That tou|ches Cae|sar near|er: read | it great^Cae||sar.
 
CAESAR
            ,        ,        ,                 ,     ,
      What tou|ches us | ourself | shall be / last served.
 
ARTEMIDORUS
         ,         ,         ,        ,       ,
      Delay | not Cae|sar, read | it in|stantly.
 
CAESAR
        ,             ,       ,
10    What, is | the fel|low mad?
 
PUBLIUS
                                   ,              ,
                                  Sirrah,| give place.
 
CASSIUS
              ,          ,       ,        ,          ,
      What, urge | you your | peti|tions in | the street?
        ,            ,    ,
      Come to | the Ca|pitol.  \\
 
[CAESAR goes up to the Senate-House, the rest following]
 
POPILIUS
          ,          ,      ,        ,           ,
      I wish | your en|terprise | today | may thrive.
 
CASSIUS
            ,      ,        ,   2
15    What en|terprise | Popi|lius?
 
POPILIUS
                                      ,          ,
                                    Fare | you well.
 
[Advances to CAESAR]
 
BRUTUS
        T    T   T  ,  2     ,
      What said Po|pilius | Lena?
 
CASSIUS
            ,        ,         ,      ,              ,
      He wished | today | our en|terprise | might thrive.
          ,         ,        ,       ,
      I fear | our pur|pose is | disco|vered.
 
BRUTUS
      <-  ,      ,         ,         ,         ,
20      Look || how he | makes to | Caesar;| mark him.
 
CASSIUS
      <- ,           ,        ,         ,        ,        o
        Casca || be sud|den, for | we fear | preven|tion.
       ,         ,               ,         ,         ,
      Brutus | what shall | be done?| If this | be known,
       ,            ,       ,       ,            ,
      Cassius | or Cae|sar ne|ver shall | turn back,
          ,          ,        ,
      For I | will slay | myself.
 
BRUTUS
                                  ,     2      ,
25                               Cassius be | constant:
         ,   2   ,       ,      ,    2       ,   2
      Popi|lius Le|na speaks | not of our | purposes;
            ,          ,          ,        ,           ,
      For look | he smiles,| and Cae|sar doth | not change.
 
CASSIUS
          ,   2    ,           ,          ,         ,      ->
      Trebo|nius knows | his time;| for look | you Bru||tus
             ,     ,     ,       ,      2     ,
      He / draws Mark | Anto|ny out | of the way.
 
[Exeunt ANTONY and TREBONIUS]
 
DECIUS BRUTUS
        ,           ,       ,        ,         ,
30    Where is | Metel|lus Cim|ber? Let | him go,
           ,       ,       ,          ,        ,       ->
      And pre|sently | prefer | his suit | to Cae||sar.
 
BRUTUS
       ,     2     ,        T     T   .   T       ,
      He | is addressed:| press near and se|cond him.
 
CINNA
       ,       ,              ,            ,            ,
      Casca,| you are | the first | that rears | your hand.
 
CAESAR
                ,   ,        ,        ,       ,
      Are we / all rea|dy? What | is now | amiss
            ,       ,         ,        ,        ,
35    That Cae|sar and | his se|nate must | redress?
 
METELLUS CIMBER
             ,           ,     2      ,      ,         ,
      Most^high,| most^migh|ty, and most | puissant | Caesar
         ,       ,         ,         ,          ,
      Metel|lus Cim|ber throws | before | thy seat
         ,        ,
      A hum|ble heart.
 
[Kneeling]
 
CAESAR
                       ,     2      ,          ,
                       I must^pre|vent thee | Cimber.
             ,          ,           ,       ,      ,
40    These cou|chings and | these low|ly cour|tesies
              ,          ,         ,    ,     ,
      Might^fire | the blood | of or|dina|ry men,
            ,         ,     ,           ,         ,
      And turn | pre-or|dinance | and first | decree
       ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
      Into | the law | of chil|dren. Be | not fond,
           ,           ,        ,           ,       ,
      To think | that Cae|sar bears | such re|bel blood
             ,          ,                  ,   ,     ,
45    That will | be thawed | from the / true qua|lity
             ,           ,         ,         ,             ,
      With that | which mel|teth fools;| I mean | sweet* words,
       T     T      T       2      ,      ,       ,
      Low-crooked court|sies and base | spaniel-|fawning.
           ,        ,       ,        ,     ,
      Thy bro|ther by | decree | is ba|nished:
           ,           ,          ,          ,         ,
      If thou | dost bend | and pray | and fawn | for him,
          ,            ,       ,     ,           ,
50    I spurn | thee like | a cur | out of | my way.
       __     ,         T   T    T      ,              ,   ->
      Know,| Caesar | doth not wrong,| nor with||out cause
            ,       ,      ,    oo
      Will he | be sat|isfied.|
 
METELLUS CIMBER
           ,          ,           ,        ,        ,
      Is there | no voice | more wor|thy than | my own
           ,             ,             ,    ,         ,
      To sound | more* sweet|ly in / great Cae|sar's ear
       ,     2    ,         ,       ,          ,
55    For the re|pealing | of my | banished | brother?
 
BRUTUS
          ,          ,         ,         ,   2    ,      2->
      I kiss | thy hand,| but not | in flat|tery Cae||sar,
         ,        ,          ,   2    ,       ,
      Desi|ring thee | that Pu|blius Cim|ber may
        ,    2    ,  2       ,        ,      ,
      Have an im|mediate | freedom | of re|peal.
 
CAESAR
      <-         ,
        What || Brutus?
 
CASSIUS
                        ,        ,        ,        ,
                       Pardon | Caesar:| Caesar | pardon:
          ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
60    As low | as to | thy foot | doth Cas|sius fall,
          ,        ,    ,              ,   2    ,       ->
      To beg | enfran|chisement | for Pu|blius Cim||ber.
 
CASSIUS
      ,                ,    ,        ,       2    ,
      I | could be / well moved,| if I | were as you:
         ,           ,         ,       ,              ,
      If I | could pray | to move,| prayers would | move me:
          ,       ,         ,        ,          ,
      But I | am con|stant as | the nor|thern star,
           ,       ,   ,            ,         ,  2
65    Of whose | true-fix/ed and | resting | quality
             ,       ,       ,        ,      ,
      There is | no fel|low in | the fir|mament.
            ,           ,              , ,           ,
      The skies | are pain|ted with / unnum|bered sparks,
                  ,    ,         ,      ,           ,
      They are / all fire | and ev|ery one | doth shine,
             ,           ,        ,           ,          ,
      But there's | but one | in all | doth hold | his place:
          ,         ,           ,           ,          ,
70    So in | the world;| 'tis fur|nished well | with men,
           ,          ,           ,          ,     ,        ->
      And men | are flesh | and blood,| and ap|prehen||sive;
       ,      2     ,      ,        ,         ,
      Yet | in the num|ber I | do know | but one
            ,    ,     ,      ,              ,
      That un|assai|lable | holds on | his rank,
           ,         ,        ,         ,       ,
      Unshaked | of mo|tion: and | that I | am he,
       ,          ,        ,        ,    2     ,
75    Let me | a lit|tle show | it, e|ven in this;
        ,   2       ,          ,          ,         ,
      That I was | constant | Cimber | should be | banished,
           ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      And con|stant do | remain | to keep | him so.
 
CINNA
         ,
      O Cae|sar.
 
CAESAR
                  ,            ,          ,     ,       ->
                Hence:| wilt thou | lift up | Olym||pus?
 
DECIUS BRUTUS
        ,      ,
      Great | Caesar.
 
CAESAR
                        ,         ,         ,           T   ->
80                    Doth not | Brutus | bootless || kneel?
 
CASCA
        T     T      ,
      Speak hands | for me.
 
[CASCA first, then the other Conspirators and BRUTUS stab CAESAR]
 
CAESAR
                               ,       ,
                           Et tu | Brute?
             ,     ,
      Then fall | Caesar.    \\
 
[Dies]
 
CINNA
       ,          ,        ,     ,        ,
      Liber|ty, free|dom; ty|ranny | is dead.
            ,          ,      ,          ,           ,
85    Run hence,| proclaim,| cry it | about | the streets.
 
CASSIUS
        ,            ,       ,               ,   ,
      Some to | the com|mon pul|pits, and / cry out
       ,          ,        ,        ,    ,
      Liber|ty, free|dom, and | enfran|chisement.
 
BRUTUS
       ,            ,    2     ,      2    ,
      People | and sen|ators, be | not affright|ed;
      <- ,      T     T     T        ,          ,         ,
        Fly || not; stand stiff:| ambi|tion's debt | is paid.
 
CASCA
       ,   2       ,        ,
90    Go to the | pulpit,| Brutus.
 
DECIUS BRUTUS
                                        ,        ,
                                   And Cas|sius too.
 
BRUTUS
               ,     ,  ->
      Where's^Pu|blius?
 
CINNA
       __      ,         ,          ,          ,  2  ->
      Here,| quite con|founded || with this | mutiny.
 
METELLUS CIMBER
        T     T   . T         ,             ,         ,           ,        ,   ->
      Stand fast toge|ther, lest || some friend | of Cae|sar's should | chance--
 
BRUTUS
      <-         ,         ,         ,     T    T    T
95      Talk || not of | standing.| Publi|us good cheer;
             ,        ,       ,     2     ,     ,
      There is | no harm | inten|ded to your | person,
       ,    2      ,        ,          ,          ,
      Nor to no | Roman | else: so | tell them | Publius.
 
CASSIUS
            ,         ,     ,     ,      2       ,
      And leave | us Pu|blius;| lest that the | people,
        ,    2      ,            ,         ,          ,
      Rushing on | us, should | do your | age some | mischief.
 
BRUTUS
       ,           ,     ,          ,           ,
100   Do so,| and let | no man | abide | this deed,
           ,        ,
      But we | the do|ers.
 
[Re-enter TREBONIUS]
 
CASSIUS
                            ,         ,    ,
                          Where | is An|tony?
 
TREBONIUS
        ,             ,        ,
      Fled to | his house | amazed:  (pickup)
       T     T     .    T          ,          ,         ,
      Men, wives, and chil|dren, stare,| cry^out | and run,
        ,   2         ,
105    As it were | doomsday*.  (picked up)
 
BRUTUS
        ,                ,           ,         o
      Fates, we | will know | your plea|sures:
      <-  ,               ,         ,          ,          ,
        That we || shall die | we know,| 'tis but | the time
      <-      ,         ,    ___         ,      ,     ___
        And draw||ing days | out,| that men | stand u|pon.
 
CASSIUS
           ,          ,          ,       ,          ,
      Why he | that cuts | off twen|ty years | of life
            ,        ,      ,          ,        ,
110   Cuts^off | so ma|ny years | of fear|ing death.
 
BRUTUS
        ,     ,                    ,        ,    ,
      Grant that,/ and then | is death | a be|nefit:
          ,        ,           ,             ,        ,
      So are | we Cae|sar's friends,| that have | abridged
            ,         ,        ,       T     Tx      T
      His time | of fear|ing death.| Stoop Romans, stoop,
           ,         ,           ,         ,          ,
      And let | us bathe | our hands | in Cae|sar's blood
       ,           ,   ,             ,            ,
115   Up to | the el|bows, and | besmear | our swords:
             ,         ,     ,        2     ,       ,
      Then walk | we forth,| even | to the mar|ketplace,
           ,             ,   ,        ,          ,
      And wa|ving our / red wea|pons ore | our heads,
             ,          ,       ,            ,     ,
      Let's^all | cry Peace,| freedom | and li|berty.
 
CASSIUS
        ,                ,         ,    ,       ,
      Stoop then,| and wash.| How ma|ny a|ges hence
              ,         ,       ,         ,     ,     2->
120   Shall this | our lof|ty scene | be ac|ted o||ver
            ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      In states | unborn,| and ac|cents yet | unknown?
 
BRUTUS
           ,      ,            ,        ,          ,
      How ma|ny times | shall Cae|sar bleed | in sport,
            ,        ,         ,       ,       ,
      That now | on Pom|pey's ba|sis lies | along
          ,    x                ,
      No wor|thier than | the dust?
 
CASSIUS
                                        ,         ,            , ->
125                                 So oft | as that || shall be,
           x          2      ,        ,         ,
      So often | shall the knot | of us | be called
           ,           ,            ,       ,     ,
      The men | that gave | their coun|try li|berty.
 
DECIUS BRUTUS
        ,                ,
      What, shall | we forth?
 
CASSIUS
                               ,           ,      ,
                              Aye, ev|ery man | away:
       ,               ,         ,          ,           ,
130   Brutus | shall lead;| and we | will grace | his heels
                   ,   ,               ,     ,          ,
      With the / most bol|dest and / best hearts | of Rome.
 
[Enter a Servant]
 
BRUTUS
        ,           ,               ,         ,     ,
      Soft, who | comes here?| A friend | of An|tony's.
 
SERVANT
            ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      Thus Bru|tus did | my ma|ster bid | me kneel:
        ,         ,    ,         ,              ,
      Thus did | Mark An/tony | bid me | fall down;
           ,      ,            ,         ,        ,
135   And be|ing pro|strate, thus | he bade | me say:
       ,    2      ,        ,    ,    2          ,
      Brutus is | noble,| wise, val/iant, and | honest;
       ,    2        ,        ,    ,             ,
      Caesar was | mighty,| bold, roy/al, and | loving:
          ,     ,   ,                ,      ,
      Say^I | love Bru/tus, and | I hon|or him;
                 ,    ,        ,      2     ,      ,
      Say I / feared Cae|sar, hon|ored him and | loved him.
          ,               ,    ,          ,    ,
140   If Bru|tus will / vouchsafe,| that An|tony
            ,       ,        ,         ,        ,
      May safe|ly come | to him,| and be | resolved,
           ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
      How Cae|sar hath | deserved | to lie | in death,
            ,    ,          ,          ,        ,
      Mark^An|tony | shall not | love^Cae|sar dead
           ,        ,       ,        ,          ,      2->
      So well | as Bru|tus li|ving; but | will fol||low
           ,         ,        ,         ,      ,      ->
145   The for|tunes and | affairs | of no|ble Bru||tus
         ,           ,         2        ,  ,      ,
      Through | the ha|zards of this / untrod | state
      <-         T    T    T      ,     2      ,        ,  2
        With || all true faith.| So says my | master | Antony.
 
BRUTUS
           ,       ,       ,         ,    2          o ->
      Thy mas|ter is | a wise | and val|iant Ro||man;
         ,        ,            ,     oo
      I ne|ver thought | him worse.|
        ,              ,           ,       ,          ,
150   Tell him,| so please | him come | unto | this place
           ,         ,      ,         ,       ,     2->
      He shall | be sat|isfied:| and by | my ho||nor
          ,         ,
      Depart | untouched.
 
SERVANT
                                 ,          ,       ,
                          I'll fetch | him pre|sently.
 
[Exit]
 
BRUTUS
          ,          ,           ,          ,          ,
      I know | that we | shall have | him well | to friend.
 
CASSIUS
          ,        ,         ,         ,       ,
155   I wish | we may:| but yet | have I | a mind
             ,           ,         ,       ,        ,
      That fears | him much;| and my | misgi|ving still
        ,     ,                 ,       o
      Falls shrewd/ly to | the pur|pose.
 
BRUTUS
      <-      ,            ,    ,    ,              ,    ,
        But here || comes^An|tony.| Welcome,| Mark^An|tony.
 
[Re-enter ANTONY]
 
ANTONY
          ,      ,         ,          ,        ,
      O migh|ty Cae|sar! Dost | thou lie | so low?
           ,         ,           ,         ,            ,
160   Are all | thy con|quests,^glo|ries, tri|umphs, spoils,
         ,              ,       ,          ,           ,
      Shrunk to | this lit|tle mea|sure? Fare | thee well.
          ,         ,      ,          ,        ,
      I know | not gen|tlemen | what you | intend,
            ,          ,         ,           ,         ,
      Who else | must be | let blood,| who else | is rank:
         ,       ,           ,        ,        ,
      If I | myself,| there is | no hour | so fit
          ,          ,       ,             ,       ,
165   As Cae|sar's death | hour; nor | no in|strument
           ,           ,          ,            ,             ,
      Of half | that worth | as those | your swords,| made rich
                   ,   ,       ,         ,           ,
      With the / most no|ble blood | of all | this world.
         ,       ,          ,         ,         ,
      I do | beseech | ye, if | you bear | me hard,
       ,                  ,         ,          ,          ,
      Now, whilst | your pur|pled hands | do reek | and smoke,
          ,           ,          ,        ,         ,
170   Fulfil | your plea|sure. Live | a thou|sand years,
          ,           ,        ,        ,        ,
      I shall | not find | myself | so apt | to die.
           ,             ,         ,        ,         ,
      No place | will please | me so,| no mean | of death,
           ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      As here | by Cae|sar, and | by you | cut^off,
             ,          ,       ,        ,         ,
      The choice | and mas|ter spi|rits of | this age.
 
BRUTUS
         ,    ,        ,           ,         ,
175   O An|tony!| Beg^not | your death | of us:
              ,         ,        ,      ,            ,
      Though now | we must | appear | bloody | and cruel,
          ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      As by | our hands | and this | our pre|sent act,
           ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      You see | we do,| yet see | you but | our hands,
            ,          ,        ,          ,           ,
      And this,| the blee|ding bus|iness they | have done:
             ,          ,     ,               ,    ,
180   Our hearts | you see | not, they | are pit|iful:
           ,     ,        ,   2     ,          ,
      And pi|ty to | the ge|neral wrong | of Rome,
           ,       ,           ,         ,      ,
      As fire | drives out | fire, so | pity,| pity
             ,           ,        ,               ,    ,
      Hath done | this deed | on Cae|sar. For / your part,
          ,           ,             x        ,          ,  2
      To you | our swords | have leaden | points Mark^|Antony:
            ,           ,          ,        ,           ,
185   Our arms | in strength | of ma|lice, and | our hearts
          ,          ,        ,       ,          ,
      Of bro|thers' tem|per, do | receive | you in
            ,      T    T     T       ,             ,   2
      With all | kind love, good | thoughts, and | reverence.
 
CASSIUS
             ,            ,         ,        ,      ,
      Your voice | shall be | as strong | as a|ny man's
       ,           ,            ,   ,      ,
      In the | dispo|sing of / new dig|nities.
 
BRUTUS
       ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
190   Only | be pa|tient till | we have | appeased
           ,      ,        ,           ,            ,
      The mul|titude,| beside | themselves | with fear,
            ,         ,       ,      ,          ,
      And then,| we will | deli|ver you | the cause,
          ,       2      ,     ,         ,         ,
      Why I,| that did love | Caesar | when I | struck him,
             ,        ,      2
      Have thus | procee|ded.
 
ANTONY
                                  ,      ,    2        ,
195                           I doubt | not of your | wisdom.
            ,     ,   ,                 ,       ,
      Let each | man ren/der me | his bloo|dy hand:
             ,       ,        ,        ,           ,
      First^Mar|cus Bru|tus will | I shake | with you;
            ,      ,        ,       ,           ,
      Next^Cai|us Cas|sius do | I take | your hand;
           ,       ,        ,           ,        ,       ->
      Now De|cius Bru|tus yours:| now yours | Metel||lus;
        ,      ,         2    ,    2   ,        ,
200   Yours | Cinna;| and my val|iant Cas|ca, yours;
               ,          ,          ,      ,       2     ,
      Though last,| not least | in love,| yours good Tre|bonius.
       ,          ,      ,      ,             ,
      Gentle|men all:| alas | what shall | I say?
          ,       ,       ,               ,   2      ,
      My cre|dit now | stands on | such slip|pery ground,
            ,        ,     ,    ,       2           ,
      That one | of two | bad ways / you must con|ceit me,
       ,          ,       ,       ,     ,
205   Either | a cow|ard or | a flat|terer.
           ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
      That I | did love | thee Cae|sar, O |'tis true:
           ,         ,        ,      ,        ,
      If then | thy spi|rit look | upon | us now,
             ,          ,           ,        ,          ,
      Shall it | not grieve | thee dea|rer than | thy death,
          ,         ,     ,    ,             ,
      To see | thy An|thony | making | his peace,
       ,              ,      ,        ,         ,
210   Shaking | the bloo|dy fin|gers of | thy foes?
            ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
      Most no|ble, in | the pre|sence of | thy corse,
          ,       ,      ,         ,            ,
      Had I | as ma|ny eyes,| as thou | hast wounds,
       ,             ,                 ,     ,           ,
      Weeping | as fast | as they / stream forth | thy blood,
           ,         ,        ,         ,         ,
      It would | become | me bet|ter, than | to close
           ,           ,         ,            ,    ,
215   In terms | of friend|ship with | thine^en|emies.
       ,    2      ,  2       ,      2         T     T     T
      Pardon me | Julius, | Here wast thou | bayed brave hart;
        ,                 ,          ,         ,         ,
      Here didst | thou fall,| and here | thy hun|ters stand
         ,              ,           ,         ,         ,
      Signed in | thy spoil,| and crim|soned in | thy lethe.
          ,            ,         ,       ,          ,
      O world!| Thou wast | the fo|rest to | this hart;
            ,        ,        ,           ,          ,
220   And this | indeed,| O world,| the heart | of thee.
            ,        ,      ,     2      ,       ,
      How like | a deer,| stricken by | many | princes,
             ,      T   T
      Dost thou | here lie?
 
CASSIUS
                              T     ,   __
                            Mark | Anto|ny.
 
ANTONY
       ,            ,      ,        o   oo
      Pardon | me, Cai|us Cas|sius:   |
           ,    ,        ,               ,    ,
225   The en|emies | of Cae|sar shall / say this;
        ,             ,               ,   ,     ,
      Then, in | a friend,| it is / cold mo|desty.
 
CASSIUS
          ,          ,          ,        ,       ,
      I blame | you not | for prai|sing Cae|sar so;
            ,     ,          ,             ,          ,
      But what | compact | mean you | to have | with us?
            ,          ,          ,       ,          ,
      Will you | be pricked | in num|ber of | our friends;
           ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
230   Or shall | we on,| and not | depend | on you?
 
ANTONY
             ,        ,           ,          ,        ,
      Therefore | I took | your hands,| but was | indeed
         ,       2        ,           ,         ,        ,
      Swayed from the | point, by | looking | down on | Caesar.
         ,             ,         ,          ,         ,
      Friends am | I with | you all | and love | you all,
        ,           ,          ,            ,        ,       ->
      Upon | this hope,| that you | shall give | me rea||sons
       ,       2      ,    ,            ,      ,
235   Why | and wherein | Caesar | was dan|gerous.
 
BRUTUS
           ,           ,       ,        ,     ,
      Or else | were this | a sa|vage spec|tacle:
           ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      Our rea|sons are | so full | of good | regard
          2      ,     ,    ,         ,        ,
      That were you,| Anto|ny, the | son of | Caesar,
             ,         ,      ,
      You should | be sat|isfied.
 
ANTONY
                                         ,        ,
240                              That's^all | I seek:
           ,       ,      ,        ,       ,
      And am | moreo|ver sui|tor that | I may
           ,         ,     ,        ,       ,
      Produce | his bo|dy to | the mar|ketplace;
           ,        ,       ,       ,          ,
      And in | the pul|pit as | becomes | a friend,
        ,             ,      ,        ,    ,
      Speak in | the or|der of | his fu|neral.
 
BRUTUS
            ,           ,  2
245   You shall | Mark^An|tony.
 
CASSIUS
                                 ,      2    ,          ,
                                Bru|tus, a word | with you.
            ,          ,         ,       ,         ,
      You know | not what | you do;| do not | consent
            ,    ,     ,             ,    ,
      That An|tony | speak in | his fu|neral:
        ,              ,         ,       ,         ,
      Know you | how much | the peo|ple may | be moved
           ,           ,          x
250   By that | which he | will utter?
 
BRUTUS
                                         ,         ,
                                        By your | pardon;
      ,            ,       ,        ,        ,
      I will | myself | into | the pul|pit first,
            ,         ,       ,        ,          ,
      And show | the rea|son of | our Cae|sar's death:
            ,    ,           ,     ,             ,
      What An|tony | shall speak,| I will | protest
            ,          ,          ,       ,
255   He speaks | by leave | and by | permis|sion,
      <- ,       ,        ,       ,        ,         ,
        And || that we | are con|tented | Caesar | shall
      <-         T    T    T          ,       ,    ,      ->
        Have || all true rites | and law|ful ce|remo||nies.
       ,        2   ,         ,          ,        ,
      It | shall advan|tage more | than do | us wrong.
 
CASSIUS
          ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      I know | not what | may fall;| I like | it not.
 
BRUTUS
            ,    ,          ,         ,         ,    ->
260   Mark^An|tony,| here take | you Cae|sar's bo||dy.
       ,           ,      2      ,   2      ,       ,
      You | shall not | in your fu|neral speech | blame us,
            ,           ,     ,     2     ,        ,
      But speak | all good | you can de|vise of | Caesar,
           ,         ,       ,    ,       ,
      And say | you do | it by | our per|mission;
        ,               ,         ,      ,        ,
      Else shall | you not | have a|ny hand | at all
         ,         ,    ,         ,            ,
265   About | his fu|neral:| and you | shall speak
        2      ,     ,         ,       ,       ,
      In the same | pulpit | whereto | I am | going,
       ,            ,         ,
      After | my speech | is en|ded.
 
ANTONY
                                    ,       ,
                                   Be | it so.
         ,       ,         ,
      I do | desire | no more.  \\
 
BRUTUS
           ,         ,      ,         ,       ,
270   Prepare | the bo|dy then,| and fol|low us.
 
[Exeunt all but ANTONY]
 
ANTONY
         ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      O par|don me,| thou blee|ding piece | of earth,
        ,   2       ,         ,         ,           ,
      That I am | meek and | gentle | with these | butchers.
        ,             ,      ,        ,        ,
      Thou art | the ru|ins of | the no|blest man
           ,      ,      ,         ,         ,
      That e|ver liv|ed in | the tide | of times.
       ,             ,           ,           ,       ,
275   Woe to | the hand | that shed | this cost|ly blood.
      ,             ,          ,      ,     ,
      Over | thy wounds | now do | I pro|phesy,
               ,            ,         ,           ,      ,
      (Which like | dumb^mouths | do ope | their ru|by lips,
          ,          ,          ,    2     ,         ,
      To beg | the voice | and ut|terance of | my tongue)
          ,             ,       ,          ,         ,
      A curse | shall light | upon | the limbs | of men;
         ,       ,             ,    ,        ,
280   Domes|tic fu|ry and / fierce ci|vil strife
             ,       ,          ,        ,    ,
      Shall cum|ber all | the parts | of I|taly;
        ,              ,         ,         ,       ,
      Blood and | destruc|tion shall | be so | in use
            ,        ,        ,      ,    ,
      And dread|ful ob|jects so | fami|liar
            ,         ,           ,            ,        ,
      That mo|thers shall | but smile | when they | behold
             ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
285   Their in|fants quar|tered with | the hands | of war;
           ,       ,           ,             ,    ,
      All pi|ty choked | with cus|tom of / fell deeds:
           ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      And Cae|sar's spi|rit ran|ging for | revenge,
           ,     ,         ,          ,           ,
      With A|te by | his side | come hot | from hell,
             ,          ,          ,       ,           ,
      Shall in | these con|fines with | a mon|arch's voice
           ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
290   Cry ha|voc, and | let slip | the dogs | of war;
                    ,    ,            ,        ,          ,
      That this / foul deed | shall smell | above | the earth
            ,    2   ,      ,             ,    ,
      With car|rion men,| groaning | for bur|ial.
            ,        ,   2   ,        ,        ,
      You serve | Octa|vius Cae|sar, do | you not?
 
[Enter a Servant]
 
SERVANT
         ,         ,    ,
      I do | Mark An|tony.  (pickup)
 
ANTONY
       ,             ,          ,         ,         ,
295   Caesar | did write | for him | to come | to Rome.
 
SERVANT
          ,        ,            x       ,        ,
      He did | receive | his letters,| and is | coming;
           ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      And bid | me say | to you | by word | of mouth--
         ,       o
      O Cae|sar!     (picked up)
 
[Seeing the body]
 
ANTONY
            ,         ,     ,            ,          ,
      Thy heart | is big,| get thee | apart | and weep.
       ,           ,        ,          ,           ,
300   Passion | I see | is cat|ching from | mine^eyes,
       ,               ,         ,        ,          ,
      Seeing | those beads | of sor|row stand | in thine,
         ,        ,       ,        ,       ,       2->
      Began | to wa|ter. Is | thy mas|ter com||ing?
 
SERVANT
           ,        ,        2    ,        ,           ,
      He lies | tonight | within se|ven leagues | of Rome.
 
ANTONY
             ,           ,           ,          ,            ,
      Post^back | with speed,| and tell | him what | hath chanced:
        ,           ,         ,       ,    2      ,
305   Here is | a mour|ning Rome,| a dan|gerous Rome,
           ,         ,      ,       ,  2    ,
      No Rome | of safe|ty for | Octa|vius yet;
            ,           ,         ,         ,       ,
      Hie hence,| and tell | him so.| Yet stay | awhile;
             ,           ,         ,          ,            ,
      Thou shalt | not back | till I | have borne | this corse
       ,          ,       ,       ,              ,
      Into | the mar|ketplace:| there shall | I try
          ,     ,        ,         ,        ,
310   In my | ora|tion, how | the peo|ple take
           ,      ,      ,           ,      ,
      The cru|el is|sue of | these bloo|dy men;
         ,        ,         ,            ,          ,
      Acco|rding to | the which,| thou shalt | discourse
           ,        ,   2   ,         ,           ,
      To young | Octa|vius of | the state | of things.
        ,              ,
      Lend me | your hand.    \\
 
[Exeunt with CAESAR's body]

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