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Coriolanus

Act II, Scene 3

The same. The Forum.
 
[Enter seven or eight Citizens]
 
FIRST CITIZEN
Once, if he do require our voices, we ought not to deny him.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
We may, sir, if we will.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
We have power in ourselves to do it, but it is a power that we have no power to do; for if he show us his wounds and tell us his deeds, we are to put our tongues into those wounds and speak for them; so, if he tell us his noble deeds, we must also tell him our noble acceptance of them. Ingratitude is monstrous, and for the multitude to be ingrateful, were to make a monster of the multitude: of the which we being members, should bring ourselves to be monstrous members.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
And to make us no better thought of, a little help will serve; for once we stood up about the corn, he himself stuck not to call us the many-headed multitude.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
We have been called so of many; not that our heads are some brown, some black, some auburn, some bald, but that our wits are so diversely colored: and truly I think if all our wits were to issue out of one skull, they would fly east, west, north, south, and their consent of one direct way should be at once to all the points of the compass.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
Think you so? Which way do you judge my wit would fly?
 
THIRD CITIZEN
Nay, your wit will not so soon out as another man's will;'tis strongly wedged up in a block-head, but if it were at liberty, 'twould, sure, southward.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
Why that way?
 
THIRD CITIZEN
To lose itself in a fog, where being three parts melted away with rotten dews, the fourth would return for conscience sake, to help to get thee a wife.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
You are never without your tricks: you may, you may.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
Are you all resolved to give your voices? But that's no matter, the greater part carries it. I say, if he would incline to the people, there was never a worthier man. Here he comes, and in the gown of humility: mark his behavior. We are not to stay all together, but to come by him where he stands, by ones, by twos, and by threes. He's to make his requests by particulars; wherein every one of us has a single honor, in giving him our own voices with our own tongues: therefore follow me, and I direct you how you shall go by him.
 
ALL
Content, content.
 
[Exeunt Citizens]
 
MENENIUS
         ,               ,    ,           ,          ,
      O sir,| you are / not right:| have you | not known
           ,     2    ,             x
      The wor|thiest men | have done it?
 
CORIOLANUS
      <-       ,       ,         ,        ->
        What must | I say,|| I pray | sir?
         ,         x        ,        ,
      Plague | upon it,| I can|not bring
            ,          ,        ,      ,              ,
      My tongue | to such | a pace.| Look sir,| my wounds,
         ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      I got | them in | my coun|try's ser|vice, when
            ,        ,          ,          ,          ,
      Some cer|tain of | your breth|ren roared | and ran
          2      ,               ,    ,
      From the noise | of our / own drums.
 
MENENIUS
      <-   ,         ,           ,          ,          ,
        O me | the gods,|| you must | not speak | of that,
       ,      2     ,      2        ,      ,      ->
      You must de|sire them to || think u|pon you.
 
CORIOLANUS
        ,      ,         ,
      Think u|pon me?| Hang 'em,
          ,            ,         ,          ,         ,       ->
      I would | they would | forget | me, like | the vir||tues
        ,        2    ,       ,     
      Which | our divines | lose by |'em.
 
MENENIUS
                                                    ,   ,
                                          You'll / mar all,
             ,            ,          ,       2           ,   ,
      I'll leave | you: pray | you speak | to 'em, I / pray you
           ,         ,
      In whole|some man|ner.
 
[Exit]
 
CORIOLANUS
                                x         ,           ,
                             Bid them | wash their | faces,
            ,            ,       T     T    T         2    ,
      And keep | their teeth | clean: so, here | comes^a brace,  ??
            ,          ,      ,             ,         ,
      You know | the cause |(sir) of | my stan|ding here.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
We do, sir; tell us what hath brought you to it.
 
CORIOLANUS
Mine own desert.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
Your own desert!
 
CORIOLANUS
Aye, but not mine own desire.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
How not your own desire?
 
CORIOLANUS
No, sir,'twas never my desire yet to trouble the poor with begging.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
You must think, if we give you any thing, we hope to gain by you.
 
CORIOLANUS
Well then, I pray, your price of the consulship?
 
FIRST CITIZEN
The price is to ask it kindly.
 
CORIOLANUS
Kindly! Sir, I pray, let me have it: I have wounds to show you, which shall be yours in private. Your good voice, sir; what say you?
 
SECOND CITIZEN
You shall have it, worthy sir.
 
CORIOLANUS
A match, sir. There's in all two worthy voices begged. I have your alms: adieu.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
But this is something odd.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
An 'twere to give again,--but 'tis no matter.
 
[Exeunt the three Citizens. Re-enter two other Citizens]
 
CORIOLANUS
Pray you now, if it may stand with the tune of your voices that I may be consul, I have here the customary gown.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
You have deserved nobly of your country, and you have not deserved nobly.
 
CORIOLANUS
Your enigma?
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
You have been a scourge to her enemies, you have been a rod to her friends; you have not indeed loved the common people.
 
CORIOLANUS
You should account me the more virtuous that I have not been common in my love. I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother, the people, to earn a dearer estimation of them; 'tis a condition they account gentle: and since the wisdom of their choice is rather to have my hat than my heart, I will practise the insinuating nod and be off to them most counterfeitly; that is, sir, I will counterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man and give it bountiful to the desirers. Therefore, beseech you, I may be consul.
 
FIFTH CITIZEN
We hope to find you our friend; and therefore give you our voices heartily.
 
FOURTH CITIZEN
You have received many wounds for your country.
 
CORIOLANUS
I will not seal your knowledge with showing them. I will make much of your voices, and so trouble you no further.
 
BOTH CITIZENS
The gods give you joy, sir, heartily!
 
[Exeunt]
 
CORIOLANUS
        T    T    T
      Most sweet voi|ces:  \\
       ,           ,       ,     ,             ,
      Better | it is | to die,| better | to starve,
             ,           ,            ,         ,       ,
      Than crave | the hire,| which first | we do | deserve.
       ,              ,         ,           ,           ,
      Why in | this wool|vish toge | should I | stand^here,
          ,        ,          ,           ,        ,
      To beg | of Hob | and Dick,| that does | appear
              ,        ,         ,        ,          x
      Their need|less vou|ches? Cus|tom calls | me to it:
            ,        ,         ,       ,                 x
      What cus|tom wills,| in all | things should | we do it,
            ,     .  T  T     T           ,        ,
      The dust | on^antique time | would lie | unswept,
            ,     2     ,           ,    ,        ,
      And moun|tainous er|ror be / too high|ly heaped
            ,      .  T    T    T     2       ,        ,
      For truth | to ore-peer. Ra|ther than fool | it so,
       ,          ,   ,                 ,      ,
      Let the | high of/fice and | the ho|nor go
          ,           ,          ,             ,     ,
      To one | that would | do thus.| I am / half through,
           ,      ,   ,               ,           2   ,
      The one | part suf/fered, the | other | will I do.
        T    T    T     ,
      Here come more | voices.  \\
            ,        ,          ,      ,           ,
      Your voi|ces? For | your voi|ces I | have fought,
         ,                ,        ,          ,         ,
      Watched for | your voi|ces: for | your voi|ces, bear
            ,           ,      ,      Tx       T    T
      Of wounds,| two* do|zen odd:| battles thrice six
       2       ,           ,         ,          ,        ,
      I have seen | and heard | of; for | your voi|ces have
            ,       ,            ,           ,    oo
      Done^ma|ny things,| some less,| some more:|
            ,         ,   ,        ,         ,
      Your voi|ces?  In|deed I | would be | consul.
 
SIXTH CITIZEN
He has done nobly, and cannot go without any honest man's voice.
 
SEVENTH CITIZEN
Therefore let him be consul: the gods give him joy, and make him good friend to the people!
 
CITIZENS
Amen, amen. God save thee, noble consul!
 
[Exeunt]
 
CORIOLANUS
Worthy voices.
 
[Re-enter MENENIUS, with BRUTUS and SICINIUS]
 
MENENIUS
       ,           ,           ,    ,
      You have | stood your | limi|tation:
      <- ,          T   T    . T     ,              ,          ,
        And the || tribunes endue | you with | the peo|ple's voice,
          ,           ,      2   ,        ,        ,       ->
      Remains,| that in | the offi|cial marks | inves||ted,
       ,      ,         ,         ,     3
      You | anon | do meet | the se|nate.
 
CORIOLANUS
                                            3       ,
                                          Is this done?
 
SICINIUS
           ,       ,       ,           ,          ,
      The cus|tom of | request | you have | discharged:
           ,       ,      ,          ,         ,        2->
      The peo|ple do | admit | you, and | are sum||moned
           ,      ,      ,          ,     ,      ->
      To meet | anon,| upon | your ap|proba||tion.
 
CORIOLANUS
        ,       2     ,        ,
      Where?| At the sen|ate-house?
 
SICINIUS
        ,        ,   ,
      There, Co|rio|lanus.   (tri with prev)
 
CORIOLANUS
       ,         ,            ,
      May I | change these | garments?
 
SICINIUS
                                        T   T    T
                                       You may, sir.
 
CORIOLANUS
        ,             T     T   T      ,           ,        ,  ->
      That I'll | straight do: and | knowing | myself || again,
          ,      2     ,        ,     oo
      Repair | to the sen|ate-house.|
 
MENENIUS
             ,         ,     ,     ,           ,
      I'll keep | you com|pany.| Will you | along?
 
BRUTUS
           ,      ,             ,
      We stay | here for | the peo|ple.
 
SICINIUS
                                          ,          ,
                                        Fare | you well.
 
[Exeunt CORIOLANUS and MENENIUS]
          ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      He has | it now,| and by | his looks,| methinks,
             ,      2      ,
      'Tis warm | at his heart.  (pickup)
 
BRUTUS
                 ,     ,          ,         ,        ,
      With a / proud heart | he wore | his hum|ble weeds.
        ,     2      ,         ,
      Will you dis|miss the | people?  (picked up)
 
[Re-enter Citizens]
 
SICINIUS
           ,        ,          ,          ,           ,
      How now,| my mas|ters, have | you chose | this man?
 
FIRST CITIZEN
          ,         ,        ,
      He has | our voi|ces, sir.  ????
 
BRUTUS
           ,          ,        ,        ,            ,
      We pray | the gods,| he may | deserve | your loves.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
        ,    ,              ,      ,        ,
      Amen, sir:/ to my | poor un|worthy | notice,
            ,          ,          ,          ,
      He mocked | us when | he begged | our voi|ces.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
      <- ,        ,        ,             ,   ,
        Cer||tainly,| he flou|ted us / downright.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
      <- __          ,      ,          ,              ,      ,
         No,|| 'tis his | kind of | speech, he | did not | mock us.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
           ,        ,           ,          ,          ,
      Not one | amongst | us, save | yourself,| but says
           ,         ,       ,         ,             ,        2->
      He used | us scorn|fully:| he should | have showed || us
            ,         ,         ,          ,        2      ,       2->
      His marks | of me|rit, wounds | received | for his coun||try.
 
SICINIUS
           ,       ,     2     ,
      Why so | he did,| I am sure.
 
CITIZENS
                                    T   T   T     ,   ,        ->
                                   No, no: no || man saw / 'em.
 
THIRD CITIZEN
             T   T  T     ____
      He | said he had | wounds,
             ,           ,        ,        o   oo
      Which he | could show | in pri|vate:   |
            ,         ,      ,   ,                ,
      And with | his hat,| thus wa/ving it | in scorn,
      ,      2      ,         ,       ,       ,
      I would be | consul,| says he:| aged | custom,
       ,    2        ,         ,         ,      ,
      But by your | voices,| will not | so per|mit me.
            ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      Your voi|ces there|fore: when | we gran|ted that,
            ,        ,      ,     2        ,         ,
      Here was,| I thank | you for your | voices,| thank you
          2       ,      ,        ,     2         ,          ,
      Your most^sweet | voices:| now you have | left your | voices,
       x           ,     2        ,          ,           ,  2
      I have no | further with | you. Was | not this | mockery?
 
SICINIUS
           ,        ,         ,     ,          x
      Why ei|ther were | you ig|norant | to see it,
          ,     2           ,    ,         ,        ,
      Or see|ing it, of / such chil|dish friend|liness
           ,           ,
      To yield | your voi|ces?
 
BRUTUS
                                 ,          ,           ,        ->
                               Could | you not | have told || him,
       ,      2      ,           ,        ,         x
      As | you were les|soned, when | he had | no power,
           ,       ,      ,        ,         ,
      But was | a pet|ty ser|vant to | the state,
          ,         ,    ,    2     ,         ,
      He was | your e|nemy,| ever spake | against
            ,      ,       2      ,         ,          ,
      Your li|berties,| and the char|ters that | you bear
        2     ,     ,         ,         ,       ,      2->
      In the bo|dy of | the weal:| and now | arri||ving
          ,         ,     ,         ,      2      ,
      A place | of po|tency,| and sway | of the state,
          ,            ,        ,       ,       ,
      If he | should still | malig|nantly | remain
        ,   ,      2         ,           ,        ,
      Fast foe / to the ple|beii,| your voi|ces might
          ,       ,          ,            ,            ,
      Be cur|ses to | yourselves?| You should | have said
            ,        ,        ,           ,          ,
      That as | his wor|thy deeds | did claim | no less
             ,         ,      ,     2       ,          ,
      Than what | he stood | for, so his | gracious | nature
              ,       ,          ,          ,
      Would think | upon | you, for | your voi|ces,
      <- ,           ,          ,         ,           ,      ,
        And || translate | his ma|lice towards | you in|to love,
        ,                ,        ,
      Standing | your friend|ly lord.
 
SICINIUS
                                        ,              ,
                                      Thus to | have said,
          ,           ,       ,            ,             x
      As you | were fore-|advised,| had touched | his spirit,
            ,          ,     ,         ,           ,
      And tried | his in|clina|tion: from | him plucked
       ,            ,         ,          ,           ,
      Either | his gra|cious pro|mise, which | you might
           ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
      As cause | had called | you up,| have held | him to;
           ,     ,      2          ,          ,       ,
      Or else | it would have | galled his | surly | nature,
             ,    ,       ,          ,    ,
      Which ea|sily | endures | not^ar|ticle,
       ,   2           ,         ,        ,         ,
      Tying him | to aught,| so put|ting him | to rage,
             ,            ,       2   ,        ,        ,      2->
      You should | have tane | the advan|tage of | his cho||ler
             ,          ,   ,
      And passed | him un|elec|ted.
 
BRUTUS
                                     ,       2     ,
                                    Did | you perceive,
          ,       ,      ,         ,         ,
      He did | soli|cit you | in free | contempt,
            ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      When he | did need | your loves:| and do | you think,
        ,     2      ,            ,         ,         ,
      That his con|tempt shall | not be | bruising | to you,
        ,    2         x          ,     ,                ,
      When he hath | power to | crush? Why,/ had your | bodies
           ,        ,          ,      2       ,          ,
      No heart | among | you? Or | had you tongues,| to cry
          ,          ,       ,         ,        o
      Against | the rec|torship | of judg|ment?
 
SICINIUS
        ,             ,        ,         ,      o
      Have you,| ere now,| denied | the as|ker:
           ,       ,        ,          ,         ,           ,  ->
      And now | again,| of him | that did | not ask,|| but mock,
          ,           ,   ___     ___
      Bestow | your sued-|for | tongues?
 
THIRD CITIZEN
            ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      He's not | confirmed,| we may | deny | him yet.
 
SECOND CITIZEN
            ,       ,
      And will | deny | him:
      <-  ,      T    T   T         ,       ,          ,
        I'll | have five hun||dred voi|ces of | that sound.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
      <- T   T     T      ,         ,             ,           ,
         I twice five || hundred | and their | friends to | piece 'em.
 
BRUTUS
      <- ,           ,    ,                  ,             ,
        Get you || hence in/stantly*,| and tell | those^friends,
      <-  ,            ,        ,         ,           T    T    T
        They have || chose a | consul | that will | from them take
             ,      ,      ,      2      T   T    T
      Their li|berties,| make them of | no more voice
             ,          ,        ,       ,         ,       2->
      Than dogs | that are | as of|ten beat | for bar||king
           ,          ,        ,
      As there|fore kept | to do | so.
 
SICINIUS
      <- ,        2   ,         ,      2   ,       ,
        Let | them assem||ble; and | on a sa|fer judg|ment,
      <- ,        ,           ,   3   3   ,       o       ,           ,
        All | revoke || your ig|norant^elec|tion:   | enforce | his pride,
                 ,    ,     ,  2          ,        2    ,
      And his / old hate | unto you;| besides,| forget^not
             ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      With what | contempt | he wore | the hum|ble weed,
           ,         ,          ,            ,           ,
      How in | his suit | he scorned | you: but | your loves,
        ,          ,         ,    2      ,          ,
      Thinking | upon | his ser|vices, took | from you
           ,     ,    ,    2       ,         ,
      The ap|prehen|sion of his | present | portance,
              ,     ,          ,   ,        ,         ,     ->
      Which^most | gibing|ly, un|gravely,| he did || fashion
       ,         2   ,   2      ,         ,         ->
      After | the inve|terate hate | he bears || you.
 
BRUTUS
       ,        ,         ,         ,   ___
      Lay | a fault | on us,| your tri|bunes,
        ,        ,         ,     ,  2          ,
      That we | labored |(no im|pediment | between)
       ,          ,           ,      2   ,         ,
      But that | you must | cast your e|lection | on him.
 
SICINIUS
       ,          ,           ,    2      ,       ,
      Say you | chose him,| more after | our com|mandment,
          2    ,       ,         ,      ,      ,          ,
      Than as gui|ded by | your own | true af|fections,| and that
             ,         ,     ,      ,      2       ,         ,
      Your minds | preoc|cupied | with what you | rather | must do, (hex with prev)
             ,           ,       ,            ,           ,
      Than what | you should,| made you | against | the grain
           ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      To voice | him con|sul: lay | the fault | on us.
 
BRUTUS
       T     T    .  T     ,              ,       2    ,
      Aye, spare us not:| say we | read* lec|tures to you,
            ,    ,   2    ,         ,           ,
      How young|ly he be|gan to | serve his | country,
            ,        ,        ,           ,               x
      How long | contin|ued, and | what stock | he springs of,
            x       ,             ,                   ,     ,
      The noble | house of | the Mar|cians, from / whence came
            ,      ,         ,        ,          ,
      That An|cus Mar|tius, Nu|ma's daugh|ter's son:
       ,           ,         ,   2    ,          ,
      Who af|ter great | Hosti|lius here | was king,
                 ,    ,      ,              ,        ,
      Of the / same house | Publius | and Quin|tus were,
          2      ,     ,         ,          ,   2      ,
      That our best | water,| brought by | conduits | hither,
           ,       ,          ,      ,       ,
      And no|bly named,| so twice | being | censor,
         2      ,      , ,
      Was his great | ances/tor.
 
SICINIUS
                                       ,       ,
                                One^|thus de|scended,
             ,        ,      ,            ,         ,
      That hath | beside | well in | his per|son wrought,
               ,    ,         ,         ,         ,
      To be / set high | in place,| we did | commend
           ,       ,       ,         ,           ,
      To your | remem|brances:| but you | have found,
       ,             ,        ,         ,          ,
      Scaling | his pre|sent bea|ring with | his past,
             ,          ,     ,    ,      2    ,
      That he's | your fi|xed e|nemy;| and revoke
            ,       ,     ,
      Your sud|den ap|proba|tion.
 
BRUTUS
                                     2      ,            x
                                  Say^you nere | had done it,
         ,              ,          ,        ,        ,
      (Harp on | that still)| but by | our put|ting on:
           ,       ,     ,     2         ,           ,
      And pre|sently,| when you have | drawn your | number,
          ,      2     ,    ,
      Repair | to the Ca|pitol.
 
ALL
                                 T   T   T
                                We will so:
       ,        ,       ,         ,      ,
      Almost | all re|pent in | their e|lection.
 
[Exeunt Citizens]
 
BRUTUS
       ,             ,
      Let them | go on:
            ,    ,         ,       ,      ,
      This mu|tiny | were bet|ter put in hazard,
             ,         ,           ,
      Than stay past^doubt,| for greater:
       ,            ,       ,        ,         ,
      If, as | his na|ture is,| he fall | in rage
             ,        ,        ,        ,          ,      2->
      With their | refu|sal, both | observe | and an||swer
           ,        ,        ,    3
      The van|tage of | his an|ger.
 
SICINIUS
                                     3     ,   2      ,
                                   To the Ca|pitol, come:
        x            ,        ,           ,     2       ,
      We will be | there be|fore the | stream of the | people:
            ,            ,         ,       ,           ,
      And this | shall seem,| as part|ly 'tis,| their^own,
             ,         ,       ,
      Which we | have goa|ded on|ward.  \\
 
[Exeunt]

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