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Coriolanus

Act II, Scene 2

The same. The Capitol.
 
[Enter two Officers, to lay cushions]
 
FIRST OFFICER
Come, come, they are almost here. How many stand for consulships?
 
SECOND OFFICER
Three, they say: but 'tis thought of every one Coriolanus will carry it.
 
FIRST OFFICER
That's a brave fellow; but he's vengeance proud, and loves not the common people.
 
SECOND OFFICER
Faith, there had been many great men that have flattered the people, who nere loved them; and there be many that they have loved, they know not wherefore: so that, if they love they know not why, they hate upon no better a ground: therefore, for Coriolanus neither to care whether they love or hate him manifests the true knowledge he has in their disposition; and out of his noble carelessness lets them plainly see it.
 
FIRST OFFICER
If he did not care whether he had their love or no, he waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good nor harm: but he seeks their hate with greater devotion than can render it him; and leaves nothing undone that may fully discover him their opposite. Now, to seem to affect the malice and displeasure of the people is as bad as that which he dislikes, to flatter them for their love.
 
SECOND OFFICER
He hath deserved worthily of his country: and his ascent is not by such easy degrees as those who, having been supple and courteous to the people, bonneted, without any further deed to have them at an into their estimation and report: but he hath so planted his honors in their eyes, and his actions in their hearts, that for their tongues to be silent, and not confess so much, were a kind of ingrateful injury; to report otherwise, were a malice, that, giving itself the lie, would pluck reproof and rebuke from every ear that heard it.
 
FIRST OFFICER
No more of him; he is a worthy man: make way, they are coming.
 
[A sennet. Enter, with actors before them, COMINIUS the consul, MENENIUS, CORIOLANUS, Senators, SICINIUS and BRUTUS. The Senators take their places; the Tribunes take their Places by themselves. CORIOLANUS stands]
 
MENENIUS
       ,          ,         ,        ,
      Having | deter|mined of | the Vol|ces,
      <- ,          ,         ,      ,         ,       ,
        And || to send | for Ti|tus Lar|tius: it | remains,
        2      ,      ,          ,         ,      ,
      As the main | point of | this our | after-|meeting,
          ,     ,        ,      ,          ,         ->
      To gra|tify | his no|ble ser|vice, that || hath
        ,      ,      2        ,         ,            ,
      Thus | stood for his | country.| Therefore*| please you,
            ,   2            ,    ,        ,       ,
      Most^re|verend and / grave el|ders, to | desire
           ,        ,               ,   ,    ,
      The pre|sent con|sul, and / last ge|neral,
                 ,    ,         ,        ,       ,
      In our / well-found | succes|ses, to | report
         ,       ,         ,        ,          ,
      A lit|tle of | that wor|thy work,| performed
          ,        ,    2   ,   ,        ,
      By Mar|tius Cai|us^Cori|ola|nus: whom
          ,      T     T   .   T      ,    2    ,
      We met | here, both to thank,| and to re|member,
            ,        ,         ,
      With ho|nors like | himself.
 
FIRST SENATOR
                                     ,         2    ,  2
                                   Speak, good* Co|minius:
             ,        ,           ,           ,         ,
      Leave^no|thing out | for length,| and make | us think
       ,    2         ,        ,         ,      ,
      Rather our | state's de|fective | for re|quital
            ,             x      ,    ,         2       ,
      Than we | to stretch it | out. Mas/ters of the | people,
          ,       ,           ,         ,         ,     2->
      We do | request | your kin|dest ears:| and af||ter
            ,       ,         ,          ,       ,     o ->
      Your lo|ving mo|tion toward | the com|mon bo||dy,
           ,           ,        ,    oo
      To yield | what pas|ses here.|
 
SICINIUS
We are convented upon a pleasing treaty, and have hearts inclinable to honor and advance the theme of our assembly.
 
BRUTUS
Which the rather we shall be blest to do, if he remember a kinder value of the people than he hath hereto prized them at.
 
MENENIUS
That's off, that's off; I would you rather had been silent. Please you to hear Cominius speak?
 
BRUTUS
Most willingly; but yet my caution was more pertinent than the rebuke you give it.
 
MENENIUS
He loves your people, but tie him not to be their bedfellow: worthy Cominius speak.
 
[CORIOLANUS offers to go away]
      ___     T    T    T
      Nay,| keep your place.
 
FIRST SENATOR
      <- ___      ,    ,      o    ,        ,          ,
         Sit | Cori||ola|nus;   | never | shame to | hear
      <-         ,          ,        ,
        What || you have | nobly | done.
 
CORIOLANUS
                                                 ,         ,
                                         Your | honor's | pardon:
       2     ,        ,          ,          ,       ,
      I had ra|ther have | my wounds | to heal | again,
             ,     ,           ,
      Than hear | say how | I got | them.
 
BRUTUS
                                           ,        ,
                                          Sir,| I hope
           ,           ,           ,
      My words | disbenched | you not?
 
CORIOLANUS
                                        ,            ,
                                       No sir:| yet^oft,
             ,            ,         ,        ,           ,
      When blows | have made | me stay,| I fled | from words.
             ,             ,          ,          ,          ,      ->
      You soothed | not, there|fore hurt | not: but | your peo||ple,
      ,     ,           2       ,
      I | love them | as they weigh.
 
MENENIUS
                                      ,              ,
                                    Pray now | sit down.
 
CORIOLANUS
       2     ,        ,           ,           ,      2     ,
      I had ra|ther have | one^scratch | my head | in the sun,
        ,     2   ,              ,           ,     ,
      When the a|larum | were struck,| than id|ly sit
           ,        ,         ,
      To hear | my no|things mon|stered.
 
[Exit]
 
MENENIUS
                                         ,      3  3       x
                                        Mas|ters of the people,  ??
            ,     ,        ,      ,     2       ,
      Your mul|tiply|ing spawn,| how can he | flatter?
               ,      2    ,      ,                     ,   ,
      That's thou|sand to one | good one*,| when you / now see
        2     ,       ,        ,          ,          ,      o
      He had ra|ther ven|ture all | his limbs | for ho|nor,
            ,           ,           x          ,       ,    ,
      Than on | one's^ears | to hear it.| Proceed | Comi|nius. (hex with prev)
 
COMINIUS
                  ,    ,           ,       2   ,   ,     2->
      I shall / lack voice:| the deeds | of Cori|ola||nus
              ,        ,         ,       ,        ,
      Should not | be ut|tered feeb|ly. It | is held
            ,      ,         ,        ,   ,
      That va|lor is | the chief|est vir|tue,
      <-             ,     ,       ,      ,     ,
        And || most dignifies the haver: if it be,
           ,        ,          ,       ,         ,
      The man | I speak | of, can|not in | the world
           ,       ,        ,         ,          ,
      Be sing|ly coun|terpoised.| At six|teen* years,
            ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      When Tar|quin made | a head | for Rome,| he fought
          ,          ,       ,              ,          ,
      Beyond | the mark | of o|thers: our then dictator,  ????
                   ,     ,         ,          ,          ,
      Whom^with / all praise | I point | at, saw | him fight,
        ,             ,    ,   2    ,         ,
      When with | his A|mazon|ian chin | he drove
            ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      The bris|tled lips | before | him: he | bestrid
       .  T     T     T      ,      2     ,          ,
      An ore-pressed Ro|man and | in the con|sul's view
        T    T    . T        ,           ,        ,
      Slew three oppo|sers: Tar|quin's self | he met,
             ,          ,         ,         ,            ,
      And struck | him on | his knee:| in that | day's^feats,
            ,          ,         ,      ,         ,
      When he | might act | the wo|man in | the scene,
       .    T     T   T      2      ,          ,          ,
      He proved best man | in the field,| and for | his meed
            ,     ,               ,         ,      ,
      Was brow-|bound with | the oak.| His pu|pil age
           ,         ,        ,       ,       ,
      Man^en|tered thus,| he wax|ed like | a sea,
           ,         ,          x         ,         ,
      And in | the brunt | of seven|teen^bat|tles since
       .    T     T     T       2     ,         ,           ,
      He lurched all swords | of the gar|land. For | this last,
          ,         ,      ,  2    ,        ,
      Before,| and in | Cori|oli, let | me say,
         ,        ,           ,          ,           ,      ->
      I can|not speak | him home:| he stopped | the fli||ers,
       ,      2      ,       ,       ,           x
      And | by his rare | exam|ple made | the coward
            ,       ,      ,          ,         ,
      Turn ter|ror in|to sport:| as weeds | before
         ,       ,       ,        ,       ,
      A ves|sel un|der sail,| so men | obeyed,
            ,       ,          ,     .    T       T      T
      And fell | below | his stem:| his sword, death's stamp,
        ,              ,         ,           ,         ,
      Where it | did mark,| it took | from face | to foot:
       ,    2      ,          ,             ,       ,
      He was a | thing of | blood, whose | every | motion
            ,           ,       ,        ,        ,       2->
      Was timed | with dy|ing cries:| alone | he en||tered
           ,        ,      2     ,       ,          ,      2->
      The mor|tal gate | of the ci|ty, which | he pain||ted
             ,        ,     ,    ,              ,
      With shun|less des|tiny:| aidless | came^off,
            ,       ,       ,     ,           ,
      And with | a sud|den re|inforce|ment struck
         ,  2    ,       ,              ,    ,
      Cori|oli like | a pla|net: now^/all's his,
            ,        ,        ,        ,           ,
      When by | and by | the din | of war | gan pierce
           ,       ,              ,           ,          x
      His rea|dy sense:| then straight | his dou|bled spirit
          ,          ,         ,          ,     ,
      Requick|ened what | in flesh | was fa|tigate,
           ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      And to | the bat|tle came | he, where | he did
       ,    ,                  ,         ,        ,      ,  ->
      Run reek/ing ore*| the lives | of men,| as if ||'twere
              ,   2    ,           ,          ,
      A | perpe|tual spoil:| and till | we called
             ,          ,      ,        ,       ,
      Both^field | and ci|ty ours,| he ne|ver stood
           ,           ,           ,
      To ease | his breast | with pan|ting.
 
MENENIUS
                                            ,       ,
                                           Wor|thy man.
 
FIRST SENATOR
          ,       ,          ,        ,         ,      ->
      He can|not but | with mea|sure fit | the ho||nors
        ,       2    ,       2
      Which | we devise | him.
 
COMINIUS
                                      ,      T    T    T
                               Our spoils | he kicked at,
             ,       ,       ,     ,              ,
      And looked | upon | things pre/cious as | they were
           ,        ,      2      ,         ,        ,
      The com|mon muck | of the world:| he co|vets less
            ,    ,       ,            ,        ,
      Than mi|sery | itself | would give,| rewards
            ,           ,       ,         ,        ,
      His deeds | with do|ing them,| and is | content
           ,           ,        ,      2
      To spend | the time,| to end | it.
 
MENENIUS
                                                ,      ,
                                         He's right | noble:
       ,     2        T    T
      Let him be | called for.
 
FIRST SENATOR
                                 T       ,   ,     2->
                               Call | Cori|ola||nus.
 
OFFICER
           ,        ,
      He doth | appear.  \\
 
[Enter CORIOLANUS]
 
MENENIUS
The senate, Coriolanus, are well pleased to make thee consul.
 
CORIOLANUS
I do owe them still my life, and services.
 
MENENIUS
It then remains, that you do speak to the people.
 
CORIOLANUS
         ,     ,
      I do beseech you,  ????
       ,            ,          ,        ,     2    ,
      Let me | oreleap | that cus|tom, for | I cannot
           ,         ,      ,    ,        2     ,
      Put on | the gown,| stand na/ked and en|treat them
                  ,      ,         ,           ,         o
      For my / wounds' sake,| to give | their suf|frage:
         ,              ,         ,          ,     o
      Please you | that I | may pass | this do|ing.
 
SICINIUS
       ,          ,              ,           ,
      Sir, the | people | must have | their voi|ces,
      <- ,          ,           ,         ,        ,     x
        Nei||ther will | they bate | one^jot | of ce|remony.
 
MENENIUS
       ,               x
      Put them | not to it:  (pickup)
        ,            ,     ,            ,
      Pray you | go fit | you to | the cus|tom,
      <- ,       ,        ,              ,     ,         ,
        And || take to | you, as | your pre|deces|sors have,
            ,       ,           ,
      Your ho|nor with | your form.  (picked up)
 
CORIOLANUS
       ,   2      ,         ,           ,         ,
      It is a | part that | I shall | blush in | acting,
            ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      And might | well be | taken | from the | people.
 
BRUTUS
Mark you that.
 
CORIOLANUS
           ,     ,             ,       ,          ,
      To brag | unto | them, thus | I did,| and thus
        ,            2  ,         ,           ,            ,
      Show them | the una|ching scars | which I | should hide,
          ,      ,         ,           ,          ,
      As if | I had | received | them for | the hire
           ,             ,
      Of their | breath^on|ly.
 
MENENIUS
                                ,         ,         x
                               Do | not stand | upon it:
          ,      ,      2     ,    ,     2       ,
      We re|commend | to you tri|bunes of the | people,
           ,        ,          ,      2      x      ,
      Our pur|pose to | them, and | to our noble | consul
        T   T  T     ,          , 
      Wish we all | joy, and | honor.
 
SENATORS
      <- ,      ,   ,            ,     ,         ,
        To Co||rio|lanus | come all | joy and | honor.
 
[Flourish of cornets. Exeunt all but SICINIUS and BRUTUS]
 
BRUTUS
           ,     ,    2     ,         ,         ,
      You see | how he in|tends to | use the | people.
 
SICINIUS
       ,              ,        2    ,     ,     2     ,
      May they | perceive | his intent:| He will re|quire them
          ,       ,         ,      ,    2     ,
      As if | he did | contemn | what he re|quested,
              ,        ,         ,
      Should be | in them | to give.
 
BRUTUS
                                       ,        2     ,
                                     Come, we'll in|form them
          ,        ,          ,      2     ,       ,
      Of our | procee|dings here:| on the mar|ketplace,
          ,          ,       ,
      I know | they do | attend | us.    \\
 
[Exeunt]

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