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King John

Act IV, Scene 2

KING JOHN'S palace.
 
[Enter KING JOHN, PEMBROKE, SALISBURY, and other Lords]
 
KING JOHN
        ,           ,        ,             ,     ,
      Here once^|again | we sit,| once^a/gain crowned
             ,       ,        ,           ,         ,
      And looked | upon,| I hope,| with cheer|ful eyes.
 
PEMBROKE
             ,       ,     ,                ,          ,
      This once | again |(but that | your high|ness pleased)
            ,       ,      ,       2        ,          ,
      Was once | super|fluous:| you were crowned | before,
                   ,   ,     ,         ,             ,
      And that / high roy|alty | was nere | plucked^off,
             ,         ,      ,    ,                 ,
      The faiths | of men,| nere stai/ned with | revolt;
             ,     ,        ,        ,          ,
      Fresh^ex|pecta|tion trou|bled not | the land
           ,       ,            ,         ,        ,
      With a|ny longed-|for* change,| or bet|ter state.
 
SALISBURY
            ,         ,         ,           ,        ,
      Therefore,| to be | possessed | with dou|ble pomp,
           ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      To guard | a ti|tle that | was rich | before;
           ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      To gild | refined | gold, to | paint the | lily,
           ,        ,        ,        ,   ,
      To throw | a per|fume^on | the vi|olet,
            ,          ,        ,      ,       ,
      To smooth | the ice,| or add | ano|ther hue
       ,           ,   ,              ,       ,
      Unto | the rain|bow; or | with ta|per-light
           ,          ,    2    ,          x         ,       ->
      To seek | the beau|teous eye | of heaven | to gar||nish,
       ,     ,           2   ,     ,        ,
      Is | wasteful | and ridic|ulous | excess.
 
PEMBROKE
       ,               ,       ,         ,         ,
      But that | your roy|al plea|sure must | be done,
            ,     ,   2      ,          T   T    T
      This^act,| is as an | ancient | tale new told,
       ,              ,       ,          ,       ,
      And, in | the last | repea|ting, trou|blesome,
       ,        ,            ,       ,    2  ,
      Being | urged at | a time | unsea|sonable.
 
SALISBURY
           ,             ,           ,    ,        ,
      In this | the an/tique,| and well-|noted | face
      <-        T    T    T         ,        ,        o
        Of || plain old form | is much | disfig|ured,
            ,        ,        ,     ,         ,
      And like | a shif|ted wind | unto | a sail,
           ,            ,            ,           ,        ,
      It makes | the course | of thoughts | to fetch | about,
        ,               ,          ,    ,
      Startles,| and frights | consi|dera|tion,
      <-  ,        ,      ,         ,          ,        ,
        Makes || sound o|pinion | sick and | truth su|spected,
           ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
      For put|ting on | so new | a fash|ioned robe.
 
PEMBROKE
             ,          ,         ,    ,              ,
      When work|men* strive | to do | better | than well,
            ,        ,             ,         ,   2     ,
      They do | confound | their skill | in co|vetousness,
           ,      ,        ,       ,       ,
      And of|tentimes | excu|sing of | a fault,
             ,          ,           ,      ,           ,
      Doth make | the fault | the worse | by the | excuse:
          ,        ,      ,       ,         ,
      As pat|ches set | upon | a lit|tle breach,
          ,        ,        ,       ,         ,
      Discre|dit more | in hi|ding of | the fault
            ,          ,         ,              ,    ,
      Than did | the fault | before | it was / so patched.
 
SALISBURY
           ,        ,        ,                ,     ,
      To this | effect,| before | you were / new crowned
             ,            ,        ,          ,             ,       2->
      We breathed | our coun|sel: but | it pleased | your high||ness
         ,        x      ,    2       T    T     T
      To o|verbear it,| and we are | all well pleased,
             ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      Since^all,| and e|very part | of what | we would
             ,        ,          ,           ,         ,
      Doth^make | a stand,| at what | your high|ness will.
 
KING JOHN
            ,        ,         ,       ,    ,      ->
      Some rea|sons of | this dou|ble co|rona||tion
      ,       2      ,           ,          ,             ,
      I | have possessed | you with | and think | them strong,
            ,             ,           ,       ,        ,
      And more,| more* strong,| then les|ser is | my fear
          ,        ,          ,          ,         ,
      I shall | indue | you with:| meantime,| but ask
        ,          ,               ,                ,    ,
      What you | would have | reformed | that is / not well,
            ,           ,         ,          ,       ,
      And well | shall you | perceive | how wil|lingly
                 ,    ,          ,           ,         ,
      I will / both hear | and grant | you your | requests.
 
PEMBROKE
           ,       ,          ,          ,          ,
      Then I,| as one | that am | the tongue | of these
           ,          ,        ,    T    T      T
      To sound | the pur|pose of | all their hearts,
        ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
      Both for | myself,| and them:| but chief | of all
             ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      Your safe|ty: for | the which,| myself | and them
        T    T     T     ,          ,   2        ,
      Bend their best | studies,| heartily | request
         2    ,    ,             ,         ,          ,
      The enfran|chisement | of Ar|thur, whose | restraint
             ,         ,    2      ,        ,       ,
      Doth move | the mur|muring lips | of dis|content
           ,        ,         ,    2     ,     ,
      To break | into | this dan|gerous ar|gument.
           ,         ,          ,         ,           ,
      If what | in rest | you have | in right | you hold,
            ,           ,             ,         ,        ,
      Why then | your fears,| which (as | they say)| attend
            ,          ,              ,     ,            ,
      The steps | of wrong,| should move | you to | mew^up
            ,       ,        ,         ,           ,
      Your ten|der kin|sman and | to choke | his days
            ,    2     ,     ,        2   ,         ,
      With bar|barous ig|norance,| and deny | his youth
            ,       ,              ,   ,     ,
      The rich | advan|tage of / good ex|ercise,
                   ,    ,     ,     ,          ,
      That the / time's e|nemies | may not | have this
           ,        ,         ,             ,    ,
      To grace | occa|sions, let | it be / our suit,
            ,          ,        ,         ,     ,
      That you | have bid | us ask | his li|berty,
             ,           ,         ,       ,        ,
      Which for | our* goods,| we do | no fur|ther ask,
        ,        2  ,          ,        ,      ,
      Than, whereu|pon our | weal on | you de|pending,
         ,               ,         ,         ,     ,
      Counts it | your weal | he have | his li|berty.
 
[Enter HUBERT]
 
KING JOHN
       ,           ,      ,       ,          ,
      Let it | be so:| I do | commit | his youth
           ,       ,         ,         ,      ,      2
      To your | direc|tion. Hu|bert, what | news with you?
 
[Taking him aside]
 
PEMBROKE
        ,            ,            ,         ,       ,
      This is | the man | should do | the bloo|dy deed:
            ,          ,        ,        ,          ,
      He showed | his war|rant to | a friend | of mine,
          ,       ,       ,      ,         ,
      The i|mage of | a wick|ed hei|nous fault
        ,             ,           ,      ,           ,
      Lives in | his eye:| that close | aspect | of his,
           ,          ,             ,    ,          ,
      Do show | the mood | of a / much trou|bled breast,
          ,        ,      ,       ,           ,
      And I | do fear|fully | believe |'tis done,
            ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      What we | so feared | he had | a charge | to do.
 
SALISBURY
           ,      ,         ,           ,         ,
      The co|lor of | the king | doth come,| and go
          ,          ,        ,         ,
      Between | his pur|pose and | his con|science,
      <-  ,      ,          T    T    T        ,        ,
        Like || heralds |'twixt two dread|ful bat|tles set:
           ,             ,   ,         ,            ,
      His pas|sion is / so ripe,| it needs | must break.
 
PEMBROKE
            ,          ,         ,          ,        ,
      And when | it breaks,| I fear | will is|sue thence
            ,        ,                 ,      ,      ,
      The foul | corrup|tion of a // sweet child's death.
 
KING JOHN
          ,        ,        ,             ,     ,
      We can|not hold | morta|lity's / strong hand.
              ,      ,      2       ,         ,         ,
      Good* lords,| although my | will to | give, is | living,
            ,           ,        ,         ,          ,
      The suit | which you | demand | is gone,| and dead.
           ,         ,       ,        ,         ,
      He tells | us Ar|thur is | deceased | tonight.
 
SALISBURY
          ,          ,           ,               ,    ,
      Indeed | we feared | his sick|ness was / past cure.
 
PEMBROKE
          ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      Indeed | we heard | how near | his death | he was,
          ,          ,          ,      ,             ,
      Before | the child | himself | felt he | was sick:
             ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
      This must | be an|swered ei|ther here,| or hence.
 
KING JOHN
       ,             ,          ,        ,         ,
      Why do | you bend | such so|lemn brows | on me?
        ,             ,           ,         ,     ,
      Think you | I bear | the shears | of des|tiny?
           ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      Have I | command|ment on | the pulse | of life?
 
SALISBURY
       ,         ,        ,      ,               ,
      It is | appa|rent foul | play; and |'tis shame
             ,           ,          ,       ,      ,
      That great|ness should | so gross|ly of|fer it;
            ,         ,          ,         ,         ,
      So thrive | it in | your game,| and so | farewell.
 
PEMBROKE
            ,          ,      x          ,          ,
      Stay^yet |(Lord^Sal|isbury)| I'll go | with thee,
            ,       2   ,     ,                 ,    ,
      And find | the inhe|ritance | of this / poor child,
           ,        ,       ,      ,        ,
      His lit|tle king|dom of | a for|ced grave.
             ,             ,           ,          ,           ,
      That blood | which owed | the breadth | of all | this isle,
        ,     ,                   ,     T    T    .    T
      Three foot / of it | doth^hold;| bad world the while:
             ,         ,          ,            ,           ,
      This must | not be | thus^borne,| this will | break^out
          ,         ,               ,    ,        ,
      To all | our sor|rows, and / ere long | I doubt.
 
[Exeunt Lords]
 
KING JOHN
             ,        ,     ,       ,       ,
      They burn | in in|digna|tion: I | repent:
             ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      There is | no sure | founda|tion set | on blood:
          ,         ,         ,        ,          ,
      No cer|tain life | achieved | by o|thers' death:
 
[Enter a Messenger]
          ,       ,           ,      ,               ,
      A fear|ful eye | thou hast.| Where is | that blood,
           ,          ,       ,      ,            ,
      That I | have seen | inha|bit in | those^cheeks?
           ,       ,       ,    ,                  ,
      So foul | a sky,| clears not / without*| a storm,
              ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Pour* down | thy wea|ther: how | goes all | in France?
 
MESSENGER
              ,         ,         ,       ,        x
      From France | to Eng|land, ne|ver such | a power
          ,     ,        ,     ,      o
      For a|ny fo|reign pre|para|tion,
           ,       ,        ,     ,       ,
      Was le|vied in | the bo|dy of | a land.
           ,           ,    ,           ,           ,
      The co|py of / your speed | is learned | by them:
            ,           ,          ,          ,        ,
      For when | you should | be told | they do | prepare,
           ,         ,            ,         ,        ,
      The ti|dings comes,| that they | are all | arrived.
 
KING JOHN
           ,           ,       ,      ,          ,
      Oh where | hath our | intel|ligence | been drunk?
        ,               ,       ,            ,          ,
      Where hath | it slept?| Where is | my mo|ther's care?
             ,        ,      ,          ,           ,
      That such | an ar|my could | be drawn | in France,
           ,          ,        ,
      And she | not hear | of it?
 
MESSENGER
                                      ,          ,
                                 My liege,| her ear
            ,             ,          ,         ,       ,
      Is stopped | with dust:| the first | of Ap|ril died
            ,      ,        ,      2    ,         ,
      Your no|ble mo|ther; and | as I hear,| my lord,
           ,     ,          ,       ,       ,
      The La|dy Con|stance^in | a fren|zy died
        T     T   .  T          ,          ,          ,
      Three days before:| but this | from ru|mor's tongue
        ,       ,          ,         ,      2       ,
      I i|dly heard:| if true,| or false | I know* not.
 
KING JOHN
        T   T   T      ,      ,           ,
      Withhold thy | speed, dread/ful oc|casion:
          ,         ,           ,        ,           ,
      O make | a league | with me,| till I | have pleased
          ,      ,        ,       T     Tx     T
      My dis|conten|ted peers.| What? Mother dead?
            ,       ,      ,           ,           ,
      How wild|ly then | walks my | estate | in France?
       ,             ,         ,             x           ,
      Under | whose^con|duct came | those powers | of France,
             ,          ,            ,         ,        ,
      That thou | for truth | givst^out | are lan|ded here?
 
MESSENGER
       ,   2       ,
      Under the | Dauphin.
 
KING JOHN
                             ,           ,        ,
                           Thou hast | made me | giddy
                   ,   ,         ,           ,          ,
      With these^/ill ti|dings. Now,| what says | the world
           ,        ,          ,         ,         ,
      To your | procee|dings? Do | not seek | to stuff
           ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      My head | with more | ill^news:| for it | is full.
 
[Enter the BASTARD and PETER of Pomfret]
 
BASTARD
           ,        ,      ,          ,          ,
      But if | you be | afeard | to hear | the worst,
            ,          ,      T  T     T      2       ,
      Then let | the worst | unheard fall | on your head.
 
KING JOHN
              ,        ,        ,       ,       ,
      Bear* with | me cou|sin, for | I was | amazed
       ,            ,         ,         ,         ,
      Under | the tide;| but now | I breathe | again
         ,          ,                 ,   ,     ,
      Aloft | the flood,| and can / give au|dience
         ,       ,       ,             ,         ,
      To a|ny tongue,| speak it | of what | it will.
 
BASTARD
       ,             ,       ,          ,     ,
      How I | have sped | among | the cler|gymen,
            ,        ,        ,        ,         ,
      The sums | I have | collec|ted shall | express.
           ,      ,          ,         ,            ,
      But as | I tra|velled hi|ther through | the land,
          ,         ,         ,        ,      ,
      I find | the peo|ple strange|ly fan|tasied,
            ,           ,         ,       ,        ,
      Possessed | with ru|mors, full | of i|dle dreams,
            ,        ,           ,          ,         ,
      Not^know|ing what | they fear,| but full | of fear.
            ,       ,         ,         ,            ,
      And here | a pro|phet that | I brought | with me
             ,            ,          ,          ,        ,
      From forth | the streets | of Pom|fret, whom | I found
            ,     ,          ,        ,         ,
      With ma|ny hun|dreds trea|ding on | his heels:
           ,         ,     .   T    T     T          ,
      To whom | he sung,| in rude harsh-soun|ding rhymes,
            ,          ,       ,        ,         ,
      That ere | the next | Ascen|sion day | at noon,
             ,          ,        ,      ,          ,
      Your high|ness should | deli|ver up | your crown.
 
KING JOHN
           ,       ,         ,          ,           ,
      Thou i|dle drea|mer, where|fore didst | thou so?
 
PETER
            ,        ,          ,            ,         ,
      Foreknow|ing that | the truth | will fall | out^so.
 
KING JOHN
       ,         ,          ,       ,       ,
      Hubert,| away | with him:| impri|son him,
           ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      And on | that day | at noon | whereon | he says
      ,           ,             ,      ,              ,
      I shall | yield up | my crown,| let him | be hanged.
         ,      ,         ,       ,        ,
      Deli|ver him | to safe|ty, and | return,
       ,   2        ,         ,       ,        ,
      For I must | use thee.| O my | gentle | cousin,
         ,                ,       ,          ,        ,
      Hearst thou | the news | abroad,| who are | arrived?
 
[Exeunt HUBERT with PETER]
 
BASTARD
             ,          ,            ,            ,        ,
      The French |(my lord)| men's^mouths | are full | of it:
          ,        ,           x           ,     ,   2
      Besides | I met | Lord^Bigot,| and Lord | Salisbury
             ,        ,        ,      ,         ,
      With eyes | as red | as new-|enkin|dled fire,
          ,         ,     ,           ,          ,
      And o|thers more,| going | to seek | the grave
          ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
      Of Ar|thur, whom | they say | is killed | tonight,
           ,        ,
      On your | sugges|tion.
 
KING JOHN
                             ,       ,         ,
                            Gen|tle kin|sman, go
             ,          ,     ,            ,      ,
      And thrust | thyself | into | their com|panies:
          ,       ,        ,            ,        ,
      I have | a way | to win | their loves | again:
        ,              ,
      Bring them | before | me.
 
BASTARD
                                ,          ,          ,
                                I | will seek | them out.
 
KING JOHN
       ,                ,          ,        ,        ,
      Nay, but | make^haste:| the bet|ter foot | before.
      ,             ,        ,       ,     ,
      O, let | me have | no sub|ject^e|nemies,
            ,        ,       ,        ,           ,
      When ad|verse for|eigners | affright | my towns
             ,         ,         ,        ,
      With dread|ful pomp | of stout | inva|sion.
      <- ,     ,     T   T   T         ,         ,
        Be || Mercu|ry, set fea|thers to | thy heels,
           ,            ,             ,        ,      ,
      And fly |(like^thought)| from them | to me | again.
 
BASTARD
           ,       ,         ,            ,          ,
      The spi|rit of | the time | shall teach | me speed.
 
[Exit]
 
KING JOHN
        ,               ,         ,      ,      ,
      Spoke like | a spright|ful no|ble gen|tleman.
          ,      ,         ,        ,            ,
      Go af|ter him:| for he | perhaps | shall need
            ,      ,        ,      ,              ,
      Some mes|senger | betwixt | me, and | the peers,
           ,         ,
      And be | thou he.
 
MESSENGER
                              ,         ,          ,
                        With all | my heart,| my liege.
 
[Exit]
 
KING JOHN
          ,        ,
      My mo|ther dead?   \\
 
[Re-enter HUBERT]
 
HUBERT
           ,      .    T    T    T            ,        ,
      My lord,| they* say five moons | were seen | tonight;
        T    T     T          ,           ,        ,
      Four fixed, and | the fifth | did whirl | about
          ,        ,        ,         ,
      The o|ther four | in won|drous mo|tion.
 
KING JOHN
      <-  ,       T
        Five || moons?
 
HUBERT
                        T   T         ,    ,              ,
                       Old men | and bel|dams in | the streets
          ,      ,     ,        ,     2   ,
      Do pro|phesy | upon | it dan|gerously:
             ,          ,         ,       ,            ,
      Young^Ar|thur's death | is com|mon in | their mouths,
            ,           ,        ,           ,             ,
      And when | they talk | of him,| they shake | their heads,
            ,       ,      ,       ,        ,
      And whis|per one | ano|ther in | the ear.
           ,           ,            ,         ,          ,
      And he | that speaks,| doth grip | the hea|rer's wrist,
              ,          ,             ,       ,      2->
      Whilst he | that hears,| makes^fear|ful ac||tion
             ,         ,            ,          ,         ,
      With wrin|kled brows,| with nods,| with rol|ling eyes.
         ,        ,       ,               ,         ,
      I saw | a smith | stand with | his ham|mer (thus)
             ,           ,         ,        ,       ,
      The whilst | his iron | did on | the an|vil cool,
           ,       ,      ,     2        ,          ,
      With o|pen mouth | swallowing | a tai|lor's news,
       ,                ,          ,        ,         ,
      Who with | his shears | and mea|sure in | his hand,
        ,             ,          ,          ,        ,
      Standing | on slip|pers, which | his nim|ble haste
            ,         ,       ,        ,       ,
      Had false|ly thrust | upon | contra|ry feet,
        ,    2     ,       ,         T   T     T
      Told of a | many | thousand | warlike French
        T    T   T  ,               ,          ,
      That were em|battled,| and ranked | in Kent.
        ,        ,         ,        ,    ,
      Ano|ther lean | unwashed | arti|ficer
            ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Cuts^off | his tale | and talks | of Ar|thur's death.
 
KING JOHN
             ,       ,            ,     ,                ,
      Why seekst | thou to | possess | me with | these fears?
           ,        ,        ,           ,          ,
      Why ur|gest thou | so oft | young^Ar|thur's death?
       ,                ,       2     ,      2    ,       ,
      Thy *hand | hath mur|dered him: I | had a migh|ty cause
           ,          ,          ,            ,         ,        2->
      To wish | him dead,| but thou | hadst none | to kill || him.
 
HUBERT
          ,         ,      ,      2       ,        ,
      No had |(my lord)?| Why, did you | not pro|voke me?
 
KING JOHN
       ,   2        ,          ,         ,     ,
      It is the | curse of | kings to | be at|tended
            ,            ,           ,   ,     2     ,
      By slaves,| that take | their hu|mors for a | warrant,
           ,         ,          ,       ,          ,
      To break | within | the bloo|dy house | of life,
           ,        ,        ,      ,     ,
      And on | the win|king of | autho|rity
          ,      ,        ,         ,         ,       2->
      To un|derstand | a law;| to know | the mea||ning
          ,    2     ,     ,       2     ,            ,
      Of dan|gerous ma|jesty,| when perchance | it frowns
        ,     ,   ,                 ,         ,
      More u|pon hu/mor, than | advised | respect.
 
HUBERT
        ,              ,          ,          ,       ,
      Here is | your hand | and seal | for what | I did.
 
KING JOHN
       ,               ,        ,            ,     2      ,
      Oh, when | the last | account |'twixt^hea|ven and earth
       ,           ,      ,                 ,          ,
      Is to | be made,| then shall | this hand | and seal
       ,            ,      T  T  T   ,
      Witness | against | us to dam|nation.
           ,          ,          ,      .  T  T    T
      How oft | the sight | of means | to do ill deeds
        T    T    T      ,                 ,          ,
      Make deeds ill | done? Hadst*| not thou | been by,
         ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      A fel|low by | the hand | of na|ture marked,
       ,              ,         ,       ,         ,
      Quoted | and signed | to do | a deed | of shame,
            ,       ,          ,       ,        ,
      This mur|der had | not come | into | my mind.
           ,        ,        ,     .   T    T  T
      But ta|king note | of thy | abhorred aspect,
       ,              ,          ,      ,     ,
      Finding | thee fit | for bloo|dy vil|lany:
       ,    ,         ,   2      ,         ,
      Apt, li/able | to be em|ployed in | danger,
          ,        ,            ,        ,          ,
      I faint|ly broke | with thee | of Ar|thur's death:
            ,        ,      ,       ,       ,
      And thou,| to be | endea|red to | a king,
        ,           ,           ,       ,          ,
      Made it | no con|science to | destroy | a prince.
 
HUBERT
           ,
      My lord.   (cut off)
 
KING JOHN
              ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
      Hadst thou | but shook | thy head | or made | a pause
           ,     T     T  T     ,       ,
      When I | spake darkly | what I | purposed,
            ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      Or turned | an eye | of doubt | upon | my face;
          ,         ,         ,            ,     ,
      As bid | me tell | my tale | in ex/press words:
        T    T    .     T          ,      ,              ,
      Deep shame had struck | me dumb,| made me | break^off,
            ,           ,                     ,      ,         ,
      And those | thy fears | might have / wrought fears | in me.
       ,            ,           ,         ,        ,
      But, thou | didst un|derstand | me by | my signs,
            ,          ,        ,     ,             ,
      And didst | in signs | again | parley | with sin,
       ,              ,           ,          ,          ,
      Yea, with|out^stop,| didst^let | thy heart | consent,
           ,      ,              ,    ,        ,
      And con|sequent|ly thy / rude hand | to act
            ,            ,           ,             ,         ,
      The deed,| which both | our tongues | held vile | to name.
       ,            ,          ,      ,         ,
      Out of | my sight,| and ne|ver see | me more:
          ,        ,          ,         ,           ,
      My no|bles leave | me, and | my state | is braved,
      ,        2     ,            ,         ,          x
      Even | at my gates,| with ranks | of fo|reign powers;
       ,             ,     ,          ,        ,
      Nay, in | the bo|dy of | this flesh|ly land,
             ,              ,   ,         ,            ,
      This king|dom, this^/confine | of blood | and breath,
         ,     ,        ,      ,         ,
      Hosti|lity | and ci|vil tu|mult reigns
          ,         ,     ,              ,          ,
      Between | my con|science and | my cou|sin's death.
 
HUBERT
       ,            ,          ,      ,     ,
      Arm you | against | your o|ther e|nemies:
             ,        ,         ,            ,         ,
      I'll make | a peace | between | your soul,| and you.
             ,       ,      ,           ,         ,
      Young^Ar|thur is | alive:| this hand | of mine
          ,       ,        ,        ,   2      ,
      Is yet | a mai|den, and | an in|nocent hand,
            ,        ,          ,        ,          ,
      Not pain|ted with | the crim|son spots | of blood.
          ,          ,       ,      ,        ,
      Within | this bo|som, ne|ver en|tered yet
            ,        ,       ,      ,    2       ,
      The dread|ful mo|tion of | a mur|derous thought,
           ,           ,         ,       ,        ,
      And you | have slan|dered na|ture in | my form,
             ,    ,       ,       ,   2  ,
      Which^how|soe|ver rude | exte|riorly,
          ,         ,      ,      ,        ,
      Is yet | the co|ver of | a fai|rer mind,
        ,           ,        ,       ,   2      ,
      Than to | be but|cher of | an in|nocent child.
 
KING JOHN
            ,        ,        ,       ,             ,
      Doth^Ar|thur live?| O haste | thee to | the peers,
        ,              ,         ,        ,        ,
      Throw this | report | on their | incen|sed rage,
            ,           ,         ,       ,     ,
      And make | them tame | to their | obe|dience.
           ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      Forgive | the com|ment that | my pas|sion made
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      Upon | thy fea|ture, for | my rage | was blind,
            ,      ,    ,      ,         ,
      And foul | ima|gina|ry eyes | of blood
          ,        ,          ,   2     ,          ,
      Presen|ted thee | more hi|deous than | thou art.
          ,       ,     ,           ,        ,
      Oh an|swer not;| but to | my clo|set bring
           ,       ,           ,       ,         ,
      The an|gry lords,| with all | expe|dient haste,
         ,         ,          ,       ,            ,
      I con|jure thee | but slow|ly: run | more* fast.
 
[Exeunt]

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