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King John

Act IV, Scene 1

A room in a castle.
 
[Enter HUBERT and Executioners]
 
HUBERT
        ,              ,      ,          ,           ,
      Heat me | these ir|ons hot,| and look | thou stand
          ,         ,        ,         ,          ,
      Within | the ar|ras: when | I strike | my foot
        ,         ,                  ,      ,    ,
      Upon | the bo|som of the // ground, rush forth,
            ,         ,           ,            ,      ,
      And bind | the boy | which you | shall find | with me
        ,             ,          ,         ,           ,
      Fast to | the chair:| be heed|ful: hence,| and watch.
 
FIRST EXECUTIONER
          ,          ,                ,   ,          ,
      I hope | your war|rant will / bear out | the deed.
 
HUBERT
          ,        ,         ,         ,           x
      Unclean|ly scru|ples fear | not you:| look to it.
 
[Exeunt Executioners]
             ,            ,         ,        ,          ,
      Young^lad | come* forth;| I have | to say | with you.
 
[Enter ARTHUR]
 
ARTHUR
            ,       ,     2
      Good mor|row Hu|bert.
 
HUBERT
                                  ,        ,         ,
                           Good* mor|row, lit|tle prince.
 
ARTHUR
            x        ,     ,             ,        ,
      As little | prince, ha/ving so | great a | title
       .  T   T     T         ,         ,         ,
      To be more prince,| as may | be: you | are sad.
 
HUBERT
          ,        ,          ,    2
      Indeed,| I have | been mer|rier.
 
ARTHUR
                                        ,    2    ,
                                       Mer|cy on me:
           ,      ,         ,         ,        ,
      Methinks | nobo|dy should | be sad | but I:
          ,      ,         ,       ,          ,
      Yet I | remem|ber, when | I was | in France,
        ,    ,                  ,       ,         ,
      Young gen/tlemen | would be | as sad | as night,
       ,          ,       ,     ,        ,     2
      Only | for wan|tonness.| By my | christendom,
         ,         ,        ,              ,    ,
      So I | were out | of pri|son and / kept sheep,
           ,       2    ,      ,        ,         ,
      I should | be as mer|ry as | the day | is long;
           ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      And so | I would | be here,| but that | I doubt
          ,       ,     ,            ,        ,
      My un|cle prac|tises | more* harm | to me:
       ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      He is | afraid | of me,| and I | of him:
               ,   ,          ,         ,          ,
      Is it / my fault | that I | was Geof|frey's son?
       ,      ,    2      ,             ,           x
      No in|deed is it | not; and | I would | to heaven
       2       ,     ,         ,            ,        ,
      I were your | son, so | you would | love me,| Hubert.
 
HUBERT [Aside]
        2    ,        ,      ,         ,          ,
      If I talk | to him,| with his | inno|cent prate
       ,           ,        ,               ,    ,
      He will | awake | my mer|cy which / lies dead:
             ,        ,        ,        ,         ,
      Therefore | I will | be sud|den, and | dispatch.
 
ARTHUR
                  ,   ,               ,    ,       ,
      Are you / sick Hu|bert? You / look pale | today,
           ,         ,           ,       ,        ,
      In sooth | I would | you were | a lit|tle sick,
           ,          ,          ,           ,           ,
      That I | might sit | all night | and watch | with you.
         ,       ,         ,         2      ,        ,
      I war|rant I | love you | more* than you | do me.
 
HUBERT [Aside]
            ,          ,        ,      3  3    ,
      His words | do take | posses|sion of my bo|som.
      <-  ,       ,           ,
        Read || here, young^|Arthur.
 
[Showing a paper. Aside:]
                                     T   T   T         ,
                                    How now foo|lish rheum?
       ,            ,   2    ,        ,         ,
      Turning | dispi|teous tor|ture out | of door?
          ,         ,           ,    ,        ,
      I must | be brief,| lest re|solu|tion drop
       ,              ,        ,       ,   2      ,
      Out at | mine^eyes | in ten|der wo|manish tears.
           ,          ,          x      T    T    T
      Can you | not read | it? Is it | not fair writ?
 
ARTHUR
       T    T  T     ,           2     ,        ,
      Too fairly, | Hubert, | for so foul | effect:
        ,     2        T    T     T          ,           ,
      Must you with | hot irons burn | out both | mine^eyes?
 
HUBERT
             ,        ,
      Young^boy,| I must.
 
ARTHUR
                                ,
                          And will | you?
 
HUBERT
                                           ,        ,
                                          And | I will.
 
ARTHUR
        ,              ,       ,           ,              ,
      Have you | the heart?| When your | head did | but ache,
          ,         ,       ,       ,           ,
      I knit | my hand|kercher | about | your brows
             ,       ,        ,          ,          ,
      (The best | I had,| a prin|cess wrought | it me)
          ,        ,      ,        ,       ,
      And I | did ne|ver ask | it you | again:
            ,         ,        ,          ,           ,
      And with | my hand,| at mid|night held | your head;
            ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      And like | the watch|ful mi|nutes to | the hour,
        ,           ,             ,        ,       ,
      Still and | anon | cheered^up | the hea|vy time;
       ,              ,                 ,     ,           ,
      Saying,| what lack | you? and / where lies | your grief?
           ,            ,        ,        ,         ,
      Or what | good* love | may I | perform | for you?
       ,  2      T    T    T                   ,    ,
      Many a | poor man's son | would have / lain still,
            ,           ,        ,        ,        ,
      And nere | have spoke | a lo|ving word | to you:
           ,                ,   ,        ,         ,
      But you | at your / sick ser|vice had | a prince.
       ,               ,          ,          ,       ,
      Nay, you | may think | my love | was craf|ty love,
            ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
      And call | it cun|ning: do,| and if | you will,
            x           ,            ,          ,        ,
      If heaven | be pleased | that you | must use | me ill,
            ,          ,      ,             ,           ,
      Why then | you must.| Will you | put^out | mine^eyes?
              ,          ,      ,         ,       ,
      These eyes,| that ne|ver did,| nor ne|ver shall
           ,         ,         ,
      So much | as frown | on you.
 
HUBERT
                                    2       ,          x
                                   I have sworn | to do it;
                  ,   ,       ,        ,          ,
      And with / hot ir|ons must | I burn | them out.
 
ARTHUR
       ,    ,                    ,     ,           ,
      Ah, none / but in | this iron | age would | do it:
            ,     ,      ,              T   T   T
      The iron | of it|self, though | heat red-hot,
          ,         ,             ,            ,          ,
      Approa|ching near | these^eyes,| would drink | my tears,
             ,          ,      ,     ,
      And quench | his fie|ry in|digna|tion
      <- ,       ,        ,             ,   ,     ,
         E||ven in | the mat|ter of / mine in|nocence:
       ,             ,         ,      ,         ,
      Nay, *af|ter that,| consume | away | in rust
       ,            ,         ,         ,          ,
      But for | contai|ning fire | to harm | mine^eye.
           ,           ,         ,          ,          ,
      Are you | more stub|born-hard | than ham|mered iron?
           ,       ,        ,            ,        ,
      And if | an an|gel should | have come | to me,
            ,        ,                ,   ,           ,
      And told | me Hu|bert should / put out | mine^eyes,
       2       ,        2     ,           ,      ,          ,
      I would not | have believed | him: no | tongue but | Hubert's.
 
HUBERT
        T    T     T     2   ,         ,
      Come forth. Do | as I bid | you do.
 
[Stamps. Re-enter Executioners, with a cord, irons, etc.]
 
ARTHUR
      <-    ,         ,         ,    __        ,         ,
        O save || me Hu|bert, save | me:| my eyes | are out
      ,                    ,     ,       2        ,      ,
      Even | with the / fierce looks | of these bloo|dy men.
 
HUBERT
        ,             ,       ,          ,          ,
      Give me | the iron | I say,| and bind | him here.
 
ARTHUR
        ,           ,         ,        ,    2      ,
      Alas,| what need | you be | so bois|terous rough?
       2      ,      ,        ,          T     T     T
      I will not | struggle,| I will | stand stone-still.
           ,        ,     ,          2    ,         ,
      For hea|ven sake | Hubert | let me not | be bound:
             ,        ,         ,            ,      ,
      Nay* hear | me Hu|bert, drive | these men | away,
          ,         ,        ,      ,       ,
      And I | will sit | as qui|et as | a lamb.
          ,          ,          ,           ,         ,
      I will | not stir,| nor wince,| nor speak | a word,
            ,      ,         ,     ,     ,
      Nor look | upon | the ir|on an|gerly:
         ,           T    T  . T     ,      2      ,
      Thrust but | these men away,| and I'll for|give you,
          ,      ,        ,        ,        ,
      Whate|ver tor|ment you | do put | me to.
 
HUBERT
           ,         ,     ,          ,          ,
      Go stand | within:| let me | alone | with him.
 
FIRST EXECUTIONER
               ,     ,          ,          ,        ,
      I am / best pleased | to be | from such | a deed.
 
[Exeunt Executioners]
 
ARTHUR
        ,        ,           ,      ,          ,
      Alas,| I then | have chid | away | my friend,
           ,        ,       ,            ,        ,
      He hath | a stern | look, but | a gen|tle heart:
       ,               ,          ,        ,        ,
      Let him | come^back,| that his | compas|sion may
             ,         ,
      Give^life | to yours.
 
HUBERT
                                   ,         ,          ,
                            Come^(boy)| prepare | yourself.
 
ARTHUR
       ,             ,    ,
      Is there | no re|medy?
 
HUBERT
        ,              ,           ,
      None, but | to lose | your eyes.  (tri with prev)
 
ARTHUR
           x       ,            ,            ,         ,
      O heaven:| that there | were but | a mote | in yours,
          ,         ,        ,       ,    2      ,
      A grain,| a dust,| a gnat,| a wan|dering hair,
      ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      Any | annoy|ance in | that pre|cious sense:
            ,                ,      ,          ,     2      ,
      Then fee|ling what / small things | are boi|sterous there,
             ,        ,           ,       ,   ,
      Your vile | intent | must needs | seem hor/rible.
 
HUBERT
           ,          ,         ,         ,            ,
      Is this | your pro|mise? Go | to, hold | your tongue.
 
ARTHUR
       ,            ,      ,      2    ,           ,
      Hubert,| the ut|terance | of a brace | of tongues,
             ,            ,        ,        ,         ,
      Must needs | want^plea|ding for | a pair | of eyes:
       ,             ,          ,        2    ,     ,
      Let me | not hold | my tongue:| let me not | Hubert,
          ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      Or Hu|bert, if | you will | cut^out | my tongue,
         ,         ,           ,        ,            ,
      So I | may keep | mine eyes.| O spare | mine^eyes,
              ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      Though to | no use | but still | to look | on you.
       ,            ,          ,       ,         ,
      Lo, by | my troth,| the in|strument | is cold,
            ,           ,
      And would | not harm | me.
 
HUBERT
                                ,         ,         ,
                                I | can heat | it, boy.
 
ARTHUR
       ,               ,           ,         ,           ,
      No, in | good* sooth:| the fire | is dead | with grief,
       ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      Being | create | for com|fort, to | be used
          ,      ,          ,           ,          ,
      In un|deserved | extremes:| see else | yourself,
                  ,  ,       ,         ,         ,
      There is / no ma|lice in | this bur|ning coal,
             ,           x           ,          ,       ,
      The breath | of heaven | has blown | his spi|rit out
             ,         ,        ,      ,         ,
      And strewed | repen|tent ash|es on | his head.
 
HUBERT
            ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      But with | my breath | I can | revive | it boy.
 
ARTHUR
           ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
      And if | you do,| you will | but make | it blush,
            ,           ,          ,        ,          ,       ->
      And glow | with shame | of your | procee|dings, Hu||bert:
       ,      2      ,            ,       ,          ,
      Nay,| it perchance | will spar|kle in | your eyes:
            ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      And like | a dog | that is | compelled | to fight,
         ,             ,        ,           ,          ,
      Snatch at | his mas|ter that | doth tarre | him on.
             ,           ,            ,        ,        ,
      All things | that you | should use | to do | me wrong
         ,          ,        ,     ,         ,
      Deny | their of|fice: on|ly you | do lack
            ,                ,     ,          ,        ,
      That mer|cy which / fierce fire | and iron | extends,
        ,      2       ,         ,       ,       ,
      Creatures of | note for | mercy-|lacking | uses.
 
HUBERT
        T    T   .   T        ,          ,            ,
      Well, see to live:| I will | not touch | thine^eye
           ,          ,         ,           ,       ,
      For all | the trea|sure that | thine^un|cle owes,
           ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      Yet am | I sworn | and I | did pur|pose, boy,
                    ,   ,      ,         ,          ,
      With this / same ve|ry iron | to burn | them out.
 
ARTHUR
         ,          ,          ,        ,           ,
      O now | you look | like Hu|bert. All | this while
       ,               ,
      You were | disguised.
 
HUBERT
                             T     T   T       ,
                           Peace: no more.| Adieu.
            ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      Your un|cle must | not know | but you | are dead.
             ,           ,        ,            ,         ,
      I'll fill | these dog|ged spies | with false | reports:
            ,       ,       T     T    T       2    ,
      And pret|ty child,| sleep doubtless,| and secure,
            ,       ,           ,         ,          ,
      That Hu|bert for | the wealth | of all | the world,
            ,        ,        2
      Will not | offend | thee.
 
ARTHUR
                                     x         ,          ,       ->
                                O heaven!| I thank | you Hu||bert.
 
HUBERT
       ,         ,     ,          ,        ,     2
      Si|lence, no | more; go | closely | in with me,
            ,       ,      ,     ,         ,
      Much^dan|ger do | I un|dergo | for thee.
 
[Exeunt]

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