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King John

Act II, Scene 1

France. Before Angiers.
 
[Enter AUSTRIA and forces, drums, etc. on one side: on the other KING PHILIP and his power; LEWIS, ARTHUR, CONSTANCE and attendants]
 
LEWIS
          ,        ,           ,           ,     ,
      Before | Angiers | well met | brave^Aus|tria,
       ,              ,       ,  ,                 ,
      Arthur | that great | forerun/ner of | thy blood,
       ,                ,          ,     ,         ,
      Richard | that robbed | the li|on of | his heart,
             ,          ,      ,        ,      ,
      And fought | the ho|ly wars | in Pa|lestine,
       .   T    T     T          ,      ,         ,
      By this brave duke | came^ear|ly to | his grave:
           ,       ,         ,        ,    ,
      And for | amends | to his | poste|rity,
          ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      At our | impor|tance hi|ther is | he come,
            ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      To spread | his co|lors boy,| in thy | behalf,
       ,           ,        ,     ,
      And to | rebuke | the u|surpa|tion
      <- ,     T   T T   2    ,       ,         ,
        Of || thy unna|tural un|cle, Eng|lish John,
          ,            ,           ,         ,        ,      ->
      Embrace | him, love | him, give | him wel|come hi||ther.
 
ARTHUR
       ,         2     ,          ,        ,        ,
      God | shall forgive | you Coeur-|de-li|on's death
           ,   ,       2        ,         T    T     T
      The ra|ther, that you | give his | offspring life,
       ,    2             ,      ,             ,         ,
      Shadowing | their right | under | your wings | of war:
          ,         ,         ,        x          ,
      I give | you wel|come with | a power|less hand,
       ,             ,       ,        T    T     T
      But with | a heart | full of | unstained love:
       ,            ,          ,             ,     ,
      Welcome | before | the gates | of An/giers duke.
 
LEWIS
         ,      ,     ,               ,          ,
      A no|ble boy,| who would | not do | thee right?
 
AUSTRIA
        ,          ,      ,            ,         ,
      Upon | thy cheek | lay I | this zea|lous kiss,
           ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      As seal | to this | inden|ture of | my love:
            ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      That to | my home | I will | no more | return,
                ,    ,          ,            ,          ,
      Till An/giers and | the right | thou hast | in France,
         ,     2       ,      ,            T     T     T
      Toge|ther with that | pale, that | white-faced shore,
              ,       T     T   .  T          ,        ,
      Whose foot | spurns back the o|cean's roar|ing tides,
            ,          ,        ,          ,      ,
      And coops | from o|ther lands | her is|landers,
             ,          ,          ,      ,              ,
      Eene^till | that Eng|land hedged | in with | the main,
            ,        ,      T   T     T         ,
      That wa|ter-walled | bulwark, still | secure
           ,      ,          ,        ,     ,
      And con|fident | from for|eign pur|poses,
             ,          ,       ,       ,         ,
      Eene^till | that ut|most cor|ner of | the west
          ,      ,     2        ,            T    T   T
      Salute | thee for her | king, till | then fair boy
           ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      Will I | not think | of home,| but fol|low arms.
 
CONSTANCE
          ,         ,           ,        ,          ,
      O take | his mo|ther's thanks,| a wi|dow's thanks,
                     ,     ,            ,         ,            ,
      Till your / strong hand | shall help | to give | him strength
           ,        ,        ,      ,          ,
      To make | a more | requi|tal to | your love.
 
AUSTRIA
            ,         ,     2      ,            ,             ,
      The peace | of hea|ven is theirs | that lift | their swords
           ,        ,         ,     ,      ,
      In such | a just | and cha|rita|ble war.
 
KING PHILIP
        ,               ,         ,        ,          ,
      Well, then | to work:| our can|non shall | be bent
          ,           ,          ,       ,         ,
      Against | the brows | of this | resis|ting town,
        ,              ,        ,        ,      ,
      Call for | our chie|fest men | of di|scipline,
           ,          ,          ,       ,     ,
      To cull | the plots | of best | advan|tages:
             ,        ,           ,         ,       ,
      We'll lay | before | this town | our roy|al bones,
        ,            ,        ,           ,           ,
      Wade to | the mar|ket-place | in French|men's blood,
           ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      But we | will make | it sub|ject^to | this boy.
 
CONSTANCE
        ,            ,       ,         ,     ,
      Stay for | an an|swer to | your em|bassy,
            ,     ,           ,             ,            ,
      Lest^un|advised | you stain | your swords | with blood,
           ,        ,       ,          ,         ,
      My Lord | Chatil|lon may | from Eng|land bring,
             ,          ,             ,         ,        ,
      That right | in peace | which here | we urge | in war,
            ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
      And then | we shall | repent | each drop | of blood,
            ,           ,         ,     ,       ,
      That hot | rash^haste | so in|direct|ly shed.
 
[Enter CHATILLON]
 
KING PHILIP
         ,       ,      ,     ,          ,
      A won|der la|dy: lo | upon | thy wish
           ,      ,        ,       ,       ,
      Our mes|senger | Chatil|lon is | arrived,
            ,         ,          ,       ,        ,
      What Eng|land says,| say brief|ly gen|tle lord,
           ,       ,           ,        ,        ,
      We cold|ly pause | for thee,| Chatil|lon speak.
 
CHATILLON
             ,          ,        ,          ,        ,
      Then turn | your for|ces from | this pal|try siege,
            ,          ,       ,         ,    2    ,
      And stir | them up | against | a migh|tier task:
       ,           ,        ,          ,        ,
      England | impa|tient of | your just | demands,
            ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      Hath put | himself | in arms,| the ad|verse^winds
             ,       ,           ,            x           ,
      Whose^lei|sure I | have stayed,| have given | him time
           ,         ,        ,         ,       ,
      To land | his le|gions all | as soon | as I.
           ,        ,       ,   2    ,          ,
      His mar|ches are | expe|dient to | this town,
           ,         ,          ,         ,      ,
      His for|ces strong,| his sol|diers con|fident:
        ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      With him | along | is come | the mo|ther-queen,
          ,      ,         ,         ,           __
      An Ace | stirring | him to | blood and | strife,
            ,          ,          ,       ,          ,
      With her | her niece,| the La|dy Blanch | of Spain,
             ,       ,        ,          ,          ,
      With them | a bas|tard of | the king's | deceased,
           ,       2   ,        ,       ,         ,
      And all | the unset|tled hu|mors of | the land,
        ,          ,    2     ,      ,      x
      Rash, in|consi|derate, fie|ry vo|luntaries,
            ,        ,               ,    ,           ,
      With la|dies' fa|ces, and / fierce dra|gons' spleens,
             ,           ,    ,               ,        ,
      Have sold | their for|tunes at | their na|tive homes,
       ,                ,      ,     ,                   ,
      Bearing | their birth|rights proud/ly on | their backs,
           ,       ,            ,   ,          ,
      To make | a ha|zard of / new for|tunes here:
           ,        ,         ,          ,           x
      In brief,| a bra|ver choice | of daunt|less spirits
            ,         ,        ,         ,          ,
      Than now | the Eng|lish bot|toms have | waft^ore
           ,       ,       ,          ,         ,
      Did ne|ver float | upon | the swel|ling tide,
          ,       ,           ,           ,      ,
      To do | offense | and scath | in Chris|tendom:
 
[Drum beats]
           ,     ,        ,           ,         ,
      The in|terrup|tion of | their chur|lish drums
            ,           ,        ,       ,             ,
      Cuts^off | more* cir|cumstance:| they are | at hand,
          ,       ,        ,            ,         ,
      To par|ley or | to fight,| therefore | prepare.
 
KING PHILIP
            ,         ,      ,     2        ,    ,
      How much | unlooked | for, is this | expe|dition.
 
AUSTRIA
          ,          ,    ,        ,        ,
      By how | much^un|expec|ted, by | so much
           ,       ,       ,       ,        ,
      We must | awake | endea|vor for | defense,
           ,         ,         ,       ,       o
      For cou|rage moun|teth with | occa|sion:
       ,             ,         ,        ,         ,
      Let them | be wel|come then:| we are | prepared.
 
[Enter KING JOHN, QUEEN ELINOR, BLANCH, the BASTARD, Lords, and forces]
 
KING JOHN
        ,              ,           ,          ,         ,
      Peace be | to France:| if France | in peace | permit
            ,         ,   2   ,         ,        ,
      Our just | and li|neal en|trance to | our own,
          ,      T      T     .    T         ,          x
      If not,| bleed France, and peace | ascend | to heaven,
              ,           ,       ,       ,        ,
      Whiles^we | God's^wrath|ful a|gent do | correct
              ,          ,            ,           ,           x
      Their proud | contempt | that beats | his peace | to heaven.
 
KING PHILIP
        ,            ,         ,         ,        ,
      Peace be | to Eng|land, if | that war | return
              ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
      From France | to Eng|land, there | to live | in peace:
       ,             ,         ,          ,           ,
      England | we love,| and for | that Eng|land's sake,
            ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      With bur|den of | our ar|mor here | we sweat:
             ,         ,            ,       ,         ,
      This toil | of ours | should be | a work | of thine;
            ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      But thou | from lo|ving Eng|land art | so far,
             ,          ,        ,           ,        ,
      That thou | hast un|der-wrought | his law|ful king,
           ,         ,         ,       ,    ,
      Cut^off | the se|quence of | poste|rity,
       T    T    T        ,           ,        ,
      Out-faced in|fant state,| and done | a rape
        ,         ,       ,       ,         ,
      Upon | the mai|den vir|tue of | the crown.
             ,      ,         ,         ,          ,
      Look^here | upon thy brother Geoffrey's face;
              ,            ,           ,       ,        ,
      These^eyes,| these^brows,| were mol|ded out | of his;
            ,       ,    ,              ,           ,
      This lit|tle ab|stract doth^|contain | that large,
              ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      Which died | in Geof|frey: and | the hand | of time,
              ,           ,      ,  2       ,       ,
      Shall draw | this brief | into as | huge a | volume:
             ,        ,         ,      ,         ,
      That Geof|frey was | thy el|der bro|ther born,
            ,         ,     ,              ,           ,
      And this | his son,| England | was Geof|frey's right,
            ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      And this | is Geof|frey's: in | the name | of God
            ,          ,           ,           ,         ,
      How comes | it then | that thou | art called | a king,
            ,        ,           ,          ,         ,
      When li|ving blood | doth^in | these tem|ples beat
             ,          ,            ,        ,      ,
      Which^owe | the crown | that thou | oremas|terest?
 
KING JOHN
             ,           ,           ,         ,          ,
      From whom | hast thou | this great | commis|sion France,
           ,        ,        ,         ,     ,
      To draw | my an|swer from | thy ar|ticles?
 
KING PHILIP
        ,      2    ,         ,            T     T      T
      From that su|pernal | judge that | stirs good thoughts
         ,       ,           ,        ,     ,
      In a|ny breast | of strong | autho|rity,
           ,       ,         ,            ,          ,
      To look | into | the blots | and stains | of right:
             ,            ,         ,    2   ,         ,
      That judge | hath made | me guar|dian to | this boy,
       ,             ,       ,       ,           ,
      Under | whose war|rant I | impeach | thy wrong,
           ,           ,        ,         ,    ,
      And by | whose^help | I mean | to chas|tise it.
 
KING JOHN
         ,           ,       ,        ,    ,
      Alack | thou dost | usurp | autho|rity.
 
KING PHILIP
          ,        ,        ,      ,         ,
      Excuse | it is | to beat | usur|ping down.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
           ,        ,           ,      ,         ,
      Who is | it thou | dost call | usur|per France?
 
CONSTANCE
           ,         ,        ,      ,        ,
      Let me | make^an|swer: thy | usur|ping son.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
       ,   ,               ,         ,          ,
      Out in/solent,| thy bas|tard shall | be king,
             ,            ,       ,           ,           ,
      That thou | mayst* be | a queen,| and check | the world.
 
CONSTANCE
          ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      My bed | was e|ver to | thy son | as true
           ,      ,            ,         ,          ,
      As thine | was to | thy hus|band, and | this boy
       ,   2      ,         ,        ,         ,
      Liker in | feature | to his | father | Geoffrey
             ,          ,        ,        ,    2     ,
      Than thou | and John,| in man|ners be|ing as like
           ,        ,             x    ,        ,
      As rain | to wa|ter, or / devil to | his dam.
          ,       ,         ,        ,        ,
      My boy | a bas|tard? By | my soul | I think
           ,       ,      ,         ,       ,
      His fa|ther ne|ver was | so true | begot,
          ,       ,      2     ,      ,         ,
      It can|not be,| and if thou | wert his | mother.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
         ,     2        ,        ,            ,          ,
      There's a good*| mother | boy, that | blots thy | father.
 
CONSTANCE
         ,     2         T  T   T                   ,    ,
      There's a good | grandam boy,| that would / blot thee.


AUSTRIA
        T
      Peace.
 
BASTARD
              T   .   T
            Hear the cri|er.
 
AUSTRIA
                              ,         ,      ,          ->
                            What | the de|vil art || thou?
 
BASTARD
       ,        2       ,         ,      ,          ,
      One | that will play | the de|vil sir | with you,
           ,         ,            ,         ,       ,
      And he | may catch | your hide | and you | alone:
       ,              ,         ,         ,         ,
      You are | the hare | of whom | the pro|verb goes
             ,        ,       ,   ,                ,
      Whose^va|lor plucks | dead li/ons by | the beard;
             ,            ,     ,            ,           ,
      I'll smoke | your skin-|coat and | I catch | you right,
       ,               x          ,         ,         ,
      Sirrah | look* to it;| in faith | I will,| in faith.
 
BLANCH
          ,         ,       ,          ,        ,
      O well | did he | become | that li|on's robe,
            ,         ,         ,     ,          ,
      That did | disrobe | the li|on of | that robe.
 
BASTARD
           ,         ,       ,         ,        ,
      It lies | as sight|ly on | the back | of him
           ,        ,        ,       ,        ,
      As great | Alci|des' shows | upon | an ass:
           ,           ,          ,        ,           ,
      But ass,| I'll take | that bur|den from | your back,
          ,         ,            ,           ,          ,
      Or lay | on that | shall make | your shoul|ders crack.
 
AUSTRIA
             ,       ,          ,           ,           ,
      What crack|er is | this same | that deafs | our ears
             ,      ,         ,      ,     2      ,
      With this | abun|dance of | super|fluous breath?
 
KING PHILIP
             x        ,         ,         ,            ,
      King^Lewis,| deter|mine what | we shall | do straight.
 
LEWIS
       ,            ,            ,          ,      ,
      Women | and fools,| break^off | your con|ference.
             ,      ,            ,     ,        ,
      King^John,| this is | the ve|ry sum | of all:
       ,     2       ,            ,      T   T      T
      England and | Ireland,| Angiers,| Touraine, Maine,
           ,         ,       ,       ,          ,
      In right | of Ar|thur do | I claim | of thee:
             ,        ,                 ,    ,          ,
      Wilt thou | resign | them, and / lay down | thy arms?
 
KING JOHN
           ,         ,       ,      ,           ,
      My life | as soon:| I do | defy | thee France,
       ,           ,          ,       ,            ,
      Arthur | of Bri|tain, yield | thee to | my hand,
           ,              ,    ,           ,           ,
      And out | of my / dear love | I'll give | thee more
            ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      Than ere | the cow|ard hand | of France | can win;
          ,          ,
      Submit | thee boy.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
                          ,    2        T  T    T
                        Come to thy | grandam child.
 
CONSTANCE
       T   T     T              ,  ,     ___
      Do child, go | to thy / grandam | child,
        T    T  T      ,          2     ,   ,
      Give grandam | kingdom,| and it gran|dam will
        ,           ,        ,       ,       ,
      Give ye | a plum,| a cher|ry, and | a fig,
         ,     2         T  T
      There's a good*| grandam.
 
ARTHUR
                                T        ,        ,
                              Good | my mo|ther peace,
          ,          ,         ,      ,            ,
      I would | that I | were low | laid in | my grave,
      ,            ,            ,             ,         ,
      I am | not worth | this coil | that's made | for me.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
           ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
      His mo|ther shames | him so,| poor* boy | he weeps.
 
CONSTANCE
            ,       ,         ,      2      ,        ,
      Now shame | upon | you whe|ther she does | or no,
            ,    ,      ,                    ,           ,
      His gran|dam's wrongs,/ and not | his mo|ther's shames
        T     T     Tx     ,          ,       2             ,
      Draws those heaven-|moving | pearls from his | poor^eyes,
               x             ,        ,       ,      ,
      Which heaven | shall take | in na|ture of | a fee:
       ,                  ,        ,        x                 ,
      Aye, with | these crys|tal beads | heaven shall | be bribed
          ,        ,        ,        ,         ,
      To do | him jus|tice and | revenge | on you.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
            ,           ,     ,          x           ,
      Thou mon|strous slan|derer | of heaven | and earth.
 
CONSTANCE
            ,          ,    ,          x           ,
      Thou mon|strous in|jurer | of heaven | and earth,
            ,         ,    2      ,          ,        ,
      Call^not | me slan|derer, thou | and thine | usurp
           ,    ,         ,      ,           ,
      The do|mina|tions, roy|alties,| and rights
             2      ,     ,      ,    2        Tx     T    T
      Of this op/pressed boy;| this is thy | eldest son's son,
         ,      ,        ,        ,         ,
      Infor|tunate | in no|thing but | in thee:
            ,         ,    ,                ,    ,
      Thy sins | are vi|sited | in this / poor child,
           ,      ,        ,         ,        ,
      The ca|non of | the law | is laid | on him,
       ,       ,         ,        ,    ,
      Being | but the | second | gene|ration
         ,       ,         ,       ,         ,
      Remo|ved from | thy sin-|concei|ving womb.
 
KING JOHN
       ,              ,
      Bedlam | have done.
 
CONSTANCE
                             ,          ,        ,
                         I have | but this | to say,
            ,       ,     ,        ,               ,
      That he | is not | only | plagued for | her sin,
           ,           ,         ,         ,           ,
      But God | hath made | her sin | and her,| the plague
           ,       ,      ,         ,           ,
      On this | remo|ved is|sue, plagued | for her,
            ,           ,          ,         ,    ,
      And with | her plague | her sin:| his in|jury,
           ,    ,        ,       ,        ,
      Her in|jury | the bea|dle to | her sin,
           ,         ,        ,       ,          ,
      All pu|nished in | the per|son of | this child,
           ,         ,         ,       ,    ___
      And all | for her,| a plague | upon | her.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
            ,    ,       ,     ,            ,
      Thou un|advi|sed scold,| I can | produce
          ,           ,         ,      ,        ,
      A will | that bars | the ti|tle of | thy son.
 
CONSTANCE
       ,           ,              ,        ,       ,
      Aye who*| doubts that,| a will:| a wick|ed will,
         ,         ,        ,         ,           ,
      A wo|man's will,| a cank|ered gran|dam's* will.
 
KING PHILIP
       ___     ,       ,              ,     ,   2
      Peace | lady,| pause, or | be more | temperate:
          ,        ,           ,              ,   ,
      It ill | beseems | this pre|sence to / cry aim
           ,      T    T    T    ,
      To these | ill-tuned re|peti|tions.
      <-  ,       ,        ,        ,        ,        ___
        Some || trumpet | summon | hither | to the | walls
             ,            ,     ,         ,           ,
      These men | of An/giers: let | us hear | them speak,
             ,       ,       ,     ,               ,
      Whose^ti|tle they | admit,| Arthur's | or John's.
 
[Trumpet sounds. Enter certain Citizens upon the walls]
 
FIRST CITIZEN
           ,        ,            ,         ,         ,
      Who is | it that | hath warned | us to | the walls?
 
KING PHILIP
              ,          ,
      'Tis France,| for Eng|land.
 
KING JOHN
                                  ,        ,        ,
                                 Eng|land for | itself:
           ,      2    ,      ,        ,        ,
      You men | of Angiers,| and my | loving | subjects*.
 
KING PHILIP
           ,       ,      2    ,      ,          ,
      You lo|ving men | of Angiers,| Arthur's | subjects*,
            ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      Our trum|pet called | you to | this gen|tle parle.
 
KING JOHN
           ,       ,          ,          ,         ,
      For our | advan|tage, there|fore hear | us first:
               ,           ,       ,           ,        ,
      These* flags | of France,| that are | advan|ced here
          ,         ,          ,    ,              ,
      Before | the eye | and pros|pect of | your town,
            ,         ,           ,       ,       ,
      Have hi|ther marched | to your | enda|magement.
           ,         ,           ,        ,         ,
      The can|nons have | their bo|wels full | of wrath,
           ,       ,       ,                ,    ,
      And rea|dy moun|ted are | they to / spit forth
            ,      ,     ,     2    ,            ,
      Their i|ron in|digna|tion against | your walls:
           ,     ,       ,        ,       ,
      All pre|para|tion for | a bloo|dy siege
           ,      ,        ,         ,            ,
      And mer|ciless | procee|ding, by | these French.
       ,              ,        ,          ,         ,
      Comfort | your ci|ty's eyes,| your win|king gates:
           ,         ,         ,             ,          ,
      And but | for our | approach | those^slee|ping stones,
            ,       ,           ,       ,       ,
      That as | a waist | doth gir|dle you | about
       ,           ,        ,          ,     ,
      By the | compul|sion of | their or|dinance
       ,          ,                ,       ,         ,
      By this | time from | their fix|ed beds | of lime
       ,       2     ,                ,   ,       ,
      Had been* dis|habi|ted, and / wide ha|voc made
            ,       x          ,      ,           ,
      For bloo|dy power | to rush | upon | your peace.
           ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      But on | the sight | of us | your law|ful king,
            ,      ,          ,       ,   2     ,
      Who pain|fully | with much | expe|dient march
              ,          ,       ,         ,           ,
      Have brought | a coun|tercheck | before | your gates,
           ,          ,             ,        ,            ,
      To save | unscratched | your ci|ty's threa|tened cheeks:
          ,           ,         ,           ,        ,
      Behold | the French | amazed | vouchsafe | a parle,
           ,        ,         ,          ,           ,
      And now | instead | of bul|lets wrapped | in fire
           ,       ,        ,      ,          ,
      To make | a sha|king fe|ver in | your walls,
             ,      .    T    T    T       ,        ,
      They shoot | but calm words fol|ded up | in smoke,
           ,        ,         ,      ,          ,
      To make | a faith|less er|ror in | your ears,
              ,        ,       ,     ,   ,
      Which^trust | accor|dingly | kind ci/tizens,
           ,        ,           ,           ,          x
      And let | us in.| Your* king,| whose la|bored spirits,
          ,        ,         ,             ,     ,
      Forwea|ried in | this ac|tion of / swift speed,
        ,    ,               ,          ,      ,
      Crave har/borage | within | your ci|ty walls.
 
KING PHILIP
           ,          ,          ,       ,        ,
      When I | have said,| make an|swer to | us both.
       ,        T    T     T      ,        ,
      Lo in | this right hand,| whose pro|tection
           ,        ,       ,       ,          ,
      Is most | divine|ly vowed | upon | the right
          ,         ,              ,          ,    ,
      Of him | it holds,| stands^young | Planta|genet,
       ,            ,      ,              ,   ,
      Son to | the el|der bro|ther of / this man,
            ,         ,         ,          ,       ,
      And king | ore him,| and all | that he | enjoys:
                   ,    ,      ,     ,        ,
      For this / down-trod|den e|quity,| we tread
          ,          ,              ,         ,           ,
      In war|like* march | these^greens | before | your town,
       ,          ,       ,    ,       ,
      Being | no fur|ther e|nemy | to you
        ,              ,          ,  ,          ,
      Than the | constraint | of ho|spita|ble zeal
       ,           ,         ,        ,        ,
      In the | relief | of this | oppres|sed child
         ,       ,        ,          ,        ,
      Reli|giously | provokes.| Be plea|sed then
          ,          ,      ,          ,      ,
      To pay | that du|ty which | you tru|ly owe,
           ,      ,         ,        T    T      T
      To that | owes it,| namely,| this young prince,
            ,          ,      ,          ,         ,
      And then | our arms,| like to | a muz|zled bear,
        ,        ,          ,     2     T      T    T
      Save in | aspect*,| hath all of|fense sealed up:
           ,         ,        ,       ,          ,
      Our can|nons' ma|lice vain|ly shall | be spent
          ,        2   ,     ,        ,           x
      Against | the invul|nera|ble clouds | of heaven;
            ,        ,             ,  ,         ,
      And with | a bles|sed and / unvexed | retire,
        .   T   T      T          ,        ,         ,
      With^unhacked swords | and hel|mets all | unbruised,
                  ,    ,          ,       ,        ,
      We will / bear home | that lus|ty blood | again
              ,         ,         ,         ,            ,
      Which here | we came | to spout | against | your town,
            ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
      And leave | your chil|dren, wives,| and you | in peace.
       ,    2        ,        ,          ,          ,
      But if you | fondly | pass our | proffered | offer,
            ,          ,    ,    2        T    T     T
      'Tis not | the roun|dure of your | old-faced walls
            ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      Can hide | you from | our mes|sengers | of war,
              ,           ,        ,           ,      ,
      Though all | these^En|glish and | their dis|cipline
            ,         ,           ,        ,      ,
      Were har|bored in | their rude | circum|ference:
             ,          ,           ,      ,         ,
      Then tell | us, shall | your ci|ty call | us lord,
           ,        ,           ,          ,          ,
      In that | behalf | which we | have chal|lenged it?
           ,          ,         ,       ,         ,
      Or shall | we give | the sig|nal to | our rage,
            ,          ,         ,        ,        o
      And stalk | in blood | to our | posses|sion?
 
FIRST CITIZEN
           ,      ,    2        ,        ,           ,
      In brief,| we are the | king of | England's | subjects*:
           ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
      For him,| and in | his right,| we hold | this town.
 
KING JOHN
          ,          ,          ,         ,        ,
      Acknow|ledge then | the king,| and let | me in.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
        ,            ,         ,           ,           ,
      That can | we not:| but he | that proves | the king,
          ,                ,    ,        ,           ,
      To him | will we / prove loy|al, till | that time
                   ,    ,         ,         ,           ,
      Have we / rammed up | our gates | against | the world.
 
KING JOHN
            ,          ,         ,          ,           ,
      Doth not | the crown | of Eng|land, prove | the king?
           ,         ,        ,          ,      ,
      And if | not that,| I bring | you wit|nesses
        T    T   T      ,           ,         ,            ___  ->
      Twice fifteen | thousand | hearts of | England's || breed.
 
BASTARD
       ,               ,
      Bastards | and else.  (pickup)
 
KING JOHN
          ,    ,        ,       ,            ,
      To ve|rify | our ti|tle with | their lives.
 
KING PHILIP
          ,  ,    2       T    T     T          ,
      As ma|ny and as | well-born bloods | as those.
 
BASTARD
            ,         ,
      Some^bas|tards too.  (picked up)
 
KING PHILIP
        ,              ,        ,       ,          ,
      Stand in | his face | to con|tradict | his claim.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
            ,         ,             ,         ,      ,
      Till you | compound | whose^right | is wor|thiest,
       ,    2       ,           ,          ,            ,
      We for the | worthi|est hold | the right | from both.
 
KING JOHN
            ,         ,         ,        ,            ,
      Then God | forgive | the sin | of all | those^souls
            ,         ,     ,        ,     ,
      That to | their e|verlas|ting re|sidence,
          ,         ,        ,         ,            ,
      Before | the dew | of eve|ning fall,| shall fleet
           ,        ,      ,         ,          ,
      In dread|ful tri|al of | our king|dom's king.
 
KING PHILIP
        ,      ,           ,      ,          ,
      Amen,| amen,| mount^che|valiers | to arms.
 
BASTARD
                ,             ,           ,              ,    ,
      Saint* George | that swinged | the dra|gon, and / ere since
        ,             ,     ,           ,          ,
      Sits on | his horse|back at | my hos|tess' door
        ,                ,      ,         ,           ,
      Teach us | some* fence.| Sirrah,| were I | at home
                 ,    ,         ,          ,    ,
      At your / den, sir|rah, with | your li|oness,
      ,          T   .  T   T      2      ,        ,
      I would | set an^ox-head | to your li|on's hide:
            ,       ,        ,
      And make | a mon|ster of | you.
 
AUSTRIA
                                       ,          ,
                                     Peace,| no more.
 
BASTARD
          ,        ,          ,         ,      ,
      O trem|ble: for | you hear | the li|on roar.
 
KING JOHN
           ,      ,         ,             ,           ,
      Up high|er to | the plain,| where we'll | set^forth
           ,        ,         ,         ,     ,
      In best | appoint|ment all | our re|giments.
 
BASTARD
        ,                ,       ,        ,         ,
      Speed then*,| to take | advan|tage of | the field.
 
KING PHILIP
           ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      It shall | be so,| and at | the o|ther hill
           ,          ,         ,      ,              ,
      Command | the rest | to stand.| God and | our right.
 
[Exeunt. Here after excursions, enter the Herald of France, with trumpets, to the gates]
 
FRENCH HERALD
           ,            ,   ,       ,           ,
      You men | of An/giers o|pen wide | your gates,
           ,           ,        ,        ,        ,
      And let | young^Ar|thur Duke | of Bri|tain in,
       ,             ,          ,           ,           ,
      Who by | the hand | of France | this day | hath made
             ,          ,         ,   2    ,        ,      ->
      Much^work | for tears | in ma|ny an Eng|lish mo||ther,
        ,       ,          ,           2      ,          ,
      Whose | sons lie*| scattered | on the blee|ding ground;
       ,        ,        ,        ,    2       ,
      Many | a wid|ow's hus|band gro|velling lies,
        ,         ,              ,  ,         ,
      Coldly | embra|cing the / disco|lored earth,
           ,     ,         ,        ,           ,
      And vic|tory | with lit|tle loss | doth play
        ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      Upon | the dan|cing ban|ners of | the French,
           ,         ,        ,       ,         ,
      Who are | at hand | trium|phantly | displayed
          ,      ,       ,     ,            ,
      To en|ter con|querors | and to | proclaim
       ,           ,         ,           ,          ,
      Arthur | of Bri|tain, Eng|land's king,| and yours.
 
[Enter English Herald, with trumpet]
 
ENGLISH HERALD
          ,          ,            ,      ,           ,
      Rejoice | you men | of An/giers, ring | your bells,
        T    T     T        2     ,           ,         ,
      King John, your | king^and Eng|land's doth | approach,
          ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      Comman|der of | this hot | mali|cious day,
             ,                ,      ,         ,         ,
      Their^ar|mors that / marched hence | so sil|ver bright,
       ,    2     T   T    T            ,           ,
      Hither re|turn all gilt | with French|men's blood:
               ,          ,        ,     ,         ,
      There* stuck | no plume | in a|ny Eng|lish crest,
            ,      ,      ,       ,           ,
      That is | remo|ved by | a staff | of France.
           ,       ,       ,                ,    ,
      Our co|lors do | return | in those^/same hands
            ,         ,      ,      2       T      T      T
      That did | display | them when we | first marched forth:
            ,       ,       ,          ,         ,
      And like | a jol|ly troop | of hunts|men come
           ,      ,         ,          ,         ,
      Our lus|ty Eng|lish, all | with pur|pled hands,
        ,            ,        ,        ,           ,
      Dyed in | the dy|ing slaugh|ter of | their foes,
      ,             ,           ,          ,        ,
      Open | your gates | and gives | the vic|tors way.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
       ,              ,           x          ,         ,
      Heralds,| from off | our towers | we might | behold
             ,          ,         ,  ,            ,
      From first | to last,| the on|set and | retire;
           ,          ,         ,       ,     ,
      Of both | your ar|mies, whose | equa|lity
       ,         T    T   T            ,   ,
      By our | best eyes can|not be / censured:
        T     .     T     T           ,           ,          ,
      Blood hath^bought blood | and blows | have an|swered blows;
          T       T      .      T            x         ,         x
      Strength matched^with strength,| and power | confron|ted power.
        ,           ,          ,       ,         ,
      Both are | alike,| and both | alike | we like:
       ,           ,     ,                       ,         x
      One must | prove grea/test. While | they weigh | so even,
           ,          ,         ,         ,          ,
      We hold | our town | for nei|ther: yet | for both.
 
[Re-enter KING JOHN and KING PHILIP, with their powers, severally]
 
KING JOHN
         ,        2        T    T    T          ,      ,
      France, hast thou | yet more blood | to cast | away?
       ,                ,        ,         ,          ,
      Say, shall | the cur|rent of | our right | run on,
             ,         ,           ,       ,     ,
      Whose^pas|sage vexed | with thy | impe|diment,
              ,          ,        ,             ,   ,
      Shall leave | his na|tive chan|nel and / oreswell
              ,         ,        x       2    ,         ,
      With course | distur|bed even | thy confi|ning shores,
          ,          ,         ,       ,       ,
      Unless | thou let | his sil|ver wa|ter keep
          ,        ,         ,       ,
      A peace|ful pro|gress to | the o|cean.
 
KING PHILIP
      <- ,          ,          ,      T    T    T         ,
        Eng||land thou | hast not | saved one drop | of blood,
           ,     T    T      T          ,         ,
      In this | hot trial, more | than we | of France,
       ,         T    T    T      2       ,        ,
      Rather | lost more. And | by this hand | I swear
             ,           ,           ,       ,      ,
      That sways | the earth | this cli|mate o|verlooks,
          ,      2      ,      ,          T    T     T
      Before | we will lay | down our | just-borne arms,
             ,            ,    2        ,            ,         ,
      We'll put | thee* down, against^whom | these^arms | we bear,
          ,       ,      ,       ,         ,
      Or add | a roy|al num|ber to | the dead:
       ,               ,            ,                 ,     ,
      Gracing | the scroll | that tells | of this / war's loss
              ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      With slaugh|ter cou|pled to | the name | of kings.
 
BASTARD
          ,     ,         ,         ,        x
      Ha ma|jesty:| how high | thy glo|ry towers,
                   ,    ,          ,         ,         ,
      When the / rich blood | of kings | is set | on fire:
          ,           ,       T   .    T    T            ,
      Oh now | doth^Death | line his dead chaps | with steel,
             ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
      The swords | of sol|diers are | his teeth,| his fangs,
           ,          ,      ,              ,         ,
      And now | he feasts,| mousing | the flesh | of men
          ,    ,         ,        ,         ,
      In un|deter|mined dif|ferences | of kings.
            ,            ,        ,       ,       ,
      Why stand | these roy|al fronts | ama|zed thus:
           ,       ,       ,             ,        ,
      Cry ha|voc kings,| back to | the stai|ned field
          ,       ,         ,      ,          x
      You e|qual po|tents, fie|ry kin|dled spirits,
            ,        ,            ,    ,         ,
      Then let | confu|sion of / one part | confirm
          ,          ,            ,      T      T     .    T
      The o|ther's peace:| till then,| blows, blood, and^death.
 
KING JOHN
             ,      ,         ,         ,       ,
      Whose par|ty do | the towns|men* yet | admit?
 
KING PHILIP
        ,    ,               ,          ,            ,
      Speak ci/tizens | for Eng|land, who's | your king.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
            ,        ,          ,         ,          ,
      The king | of Eng|land, when | we know | the king.
 
KING PHILIP
        ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
      Know him | in us,| that here | hold^up | his right.
 
KING JOHN
          ,         ,         ,      ,    ,
      In us,| that are | our^own | great de/puty
            ,        ,        ,        ,        ,
      And bear | posses|sion of | our per|son here,
        ,            ,             ,     ,        ,
      Lord of | our pre|sence An/giers, and | of you.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
          ,        x           ,    .  T   T    T
      A grea|ter power | then we | denies all this,
            ,             ,  ,        ,        ,
      And till | it be / undoub|ted, we | do lock
           ,        ,                   ,      ,     ,
      Our for|mer scru|ple in our // strong-barred gates:
        ,               ,       ,          ,          ,
      Kings of | our* fear,| until | our fears | resolved
          ,         ,         ,       ,             ,
      Be by | some cer|tain king | purged and | deposed.
 
BASTARD
            x               ,              ,     ,           ,
      By heaven,| these scroyles | of An/giers flout | you kings,
            ,         ,      ,          ,       ,
      And stand | secure|ly on | their bat|tlements,
          ,      ,    2      ,            ,          ,
      As in | a the|ater, whence | they gape | and point
           ,       ,     2      ,           ,         ,
      At your | indus|trious scenes | and acts | of death.
            ,      ,      ,         ,         ,
      Your roy|al pre|sences | be ruled | by me,
           ,         ,     ,      2   ,    ,
      Do like | the mu|tinies | of Jeru|salem,
            ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      Be friends | awhile | and both | conjoint|ly bend
             ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
      Your shar|pest deeds | of ma|lice on | this town.
           ,          ,           ,          ,         ,
      By east | and west | let France | and Eng|land mount
             ,     2    ,        ,       ,          ,
      Their bat|tering can|non char|ged to | the mouths,
                     ,   ,        ,                 ,      ,
      Till their / soul-fea|ring cla|mors have / brawled down
            ,       ,     ,     2      ,   2      ,
      The flin|ty ribs | of this con|temptuous | city:
            ,       ,       ,     ,            ,
      I'd play | inces|santly | upon | these^jades,
      ,            ,  ,        ,    ,
      Even | till un|fenced | deso|lation
        ,              ,      ,        ,       ,
      Leave them | as na|ked as | the vul|gar air:
             ,        ,       ,      ,         ,
      That done,| disse|ver your | uni|ted strengths,
            ,          ,        ,        ,       ,
      And part | your min|gled co|lors once | again,
             ,         ,          ,       ,          ,
      Turn face | to face,| and bloo|dy point | to point:
        ,          ,       ,                 ,    ,
      Then in | a mo|ment For|tune shall / cull forth
       ,             ,         ,      ,
      Out of | one side | her hap|py min|ion,
      <- ,      T   T  T      ,            ,         ,
        To || whom in fa|vor she | shall give | the day,
            ,     ,            ,    2    ,     ,
      And kiss | him with | a glo|rious vic|tory:
            ,                 ,    ,        ,        ,
      How like | you this / wild coun|sel migh|ty states,
         ,         ,    ,                  ,    ,
      Smacks it | not some/thing of | the po|licy.
 
KING JOHN
       ,            ,           ,        ,          ,
      Now by | the sky | that hangs | above | our heads,
          ,         ,       ,                 ,           x
      I like | it well.| France, shall | we knit | our powers
           ,              ,   ,      ,          ,
      And lay | this An/giers e|ven to | the ground;
            ,       ,      ,               ,        ,
      Then af|ter fight | who shall | be king | of it?
 
BASTARD
           ,          ,         ,       ,       ,
      And if | thou hast | the met|tle of | a king,
       ,         ,             ,      2      ,         ,
      Being | wronged as | we are | by this pee|vish town:
        ,               ,         ,       ,     ,
      Turn thou | the mouth | of thy | artil|lery,
          ,          ,        ,            ,       ,
      As we | will ours,| against | these sau|cy walls,
            ,          ,           ,           ,          ,
      And when | that we | have dashed | them to | the ground,
            ,       ,        ,               ,    ,
      Why then | defy | each o|ther, and / pell-mell
             ,      ,          ,            x          ,
      Make^work | upon | ourselves,| for heaven | or hell.
 
KING PHILIP
       ,           ,    ,     ,                    ,
      Let it | be so:| Say, where / will you | assault?
 
KING JOHN
       ,              ,           ,        ,
      We from | the west | will send | destruc|tion
      <- ,       ,     ,        ,
        In||to this | city's | bosom.  \\
 
AUSTRIA
      ,              ,
      I from | the north.
 
KING PHILIP
                          ,    ,                   ,
                         Our thun/der from | the south,
              ,            ,         ,        ,          ,
      Shall rain | their drift | of bul|lets on | this town.
 
BASTARD
         ,        ,      ,            ,          ,
      O pru|dent di|scipline!| From north | to south:
       ,   2           ,       ,             ,          ,
      Austria | and France | shoot in | each^o|ther's mouth.
             ,          ,         ,      ,      ,
      I'll stir | them to | it. Come,| away,| away.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
        ,               ,            ,       ,          ,
      Hear us | great^kings,| vouchsafe | awhile | to stay
          ,           ,          ,      .    T    T      T
      And I | shall show | you peace | and fair-faced league:
       ,              ,          ,     ,          ,
      Win you | this ci|ty with/out stroke,| or wound,
       ,               ,          ,         ,         ,
      Rescue | those brea|thing lives | to die | in beds,
             ,          ,     ,      ,          ,
      That here | come sac|rifi|ces for | the field.
          ,      ,          ,         ,       ,
      Perse|ver not,| but hear | me migh|ty kings.
 
KING JOHN
             ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      Speak^on | with fa|vor, we | are bent | to hear.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
             ,         ,          ,          ,       ,
      That daugh|ter there | of Spain,| the La|dy Blanch
           ,         ,          ,      ,          ,
      Is niece | to Eng|land, look | upon | the years
          ,    2     ,        ,           ,       ,
      Of Le|wis the Dau|phin and | that love|ly maid.
          ,       ,            ,        ,          ,     ->
      If lus|ty love | should go | in quest | of beau||ty,
        ,           2     ,        ,         ,          ,
      Where | should he find | it fai|rer, than | in Blanch:
          ,         ,            ,         ,         ,      ->
      If zea|lous love | should go | in search | of vir||tue,
        ,           2     ,        ,       ,          ,
      Where | should he find | it pu|rer than | in Blanch?
           ,       ,           ,         ,          ,
      If love | ambi|tious, sought | a match | of birth,
              ,       T     Tx     T           ,       ,
      Whose veins | bound richer blood | than La|dy Blanch?
        ,            ,        ,       ,         ,
      Such as | she is,| in beau|ty, vir|tue, birth,
                 ,    ,        ,      ,         ,
      Is the / young Dau|phin eve|ry way | complete,
          ,         ,          ,     ,           ,
      If not | complete | of, say | he is | not she:
           ,       ,           ,               ,    ,
      And she | again | wants^no|thing, to / name want,
           ,        ,    ,          ,            ,
      If want | it be | not that | she is | not he:
       ,            ,      ,           ,       ,
      He is | the half | part of | a bles|sed man,
        ,           ,     ,         ,        ,
      Left to | be fi|nished | by such | as she,
           ,        ,       ,      ,      ,
      And she | a fair | divi|ded ex|cellence,
              ,        ,       ,         ,        ,
      Whose full|ness of | perfec|tion lies | in him.
         ,          ,       ,          ,           ,
      O two | such^sil|ver cur|rents when | they join
          ,     ,         ,            ,           ,
      Do glo|rify | the banks | that bound | them in:
           ,            ,         ,            ,            ,
      And two | such^shores | to two | such^streams | made^one,
             ,         ,          ,            ,          ,
      Two* such | control|ling bounds | shall you | be, kings,
           ,      ,    ,                 ,       ,
      To these | two prin/ces, if | you mar|ry them:
            ,       ,          ,          ,    2   ,
      This un|ion shall | do more | than bat|tery can
                 ,   ,        ,          ,          ,
      To our / fast-clo|sed gates:| for at | this match,
             ,         ,           ,       ,        ,
      With swif|ter spleen | than pow|der can | enforce
            ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
      The mouth | of pas|sage shall | we fling | wide^ope,
            ,         ,          ,         ,           ,
      And give | you en|trance: but | without | this match,
           ,       ,      ,         ,         ,
      The sea | enra|ged is | not half | so deaf,
       ,            ,      ,      ,               ,
      Lions | more con|fident,| mountains | and rocks
             ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      More free | from mo|tion, no | not Death | himself
          ,       ,      ,      2    ,     ,
      In mor|tal fu|ry half | so peremp|tory,
          ,        ,          ,
      As we | to keep | this ci|ty.
 
BASTARD
                                      ,         ,
                                   Here's | a stay,
              ,          ,       ,             ,    ,
      That shakes | the rot|ten car|cass of / old Death
       ,             ,       T   .   T     T         ,
      Out of | his rags.| Here's a large mouth | indeed,
             ,             ,           ,           ,           ,
      That spits | forth^death | and moun|tains, rocks,| and seas,
        ,           ,      ,        ,        x
      Talks as | famil|iarly | of roa|ring lions
           ,          ,    ,           ,       ,
      As maids | of thir|teen do | of pup|py-dogs.
            ,      ,       ,          ,       ,
      What can|noneer | begot | this lus|ty blood,
            ,       T     Tx     T          ,            ,
      He speaks | plain cannon fire,| and smoke,| and bounce;
           ,          ,     ,      ,           ,
      He gives | the bas|tina|do with | his tongue:
            ,         ,          ,        ,        ,
      Our ears | are cud|geled, not | a word | of his
           ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      But buf|fets bet|ter than | a fist | of France:
         ,             ,      ,        ,             ,
      Zounds, I | was ne|ver so | bethumped | with words,
            ,            ,         ,          ,       ,
      Since^I | first^called | my bro|ther's fa|ther dad.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
       ,     ,                   ,          ,           ,
      Son, list / to this | conjunc|tion, make | this match:
        ,               ,        ,       ,        ,
      Give with | our niece | a dow|ry large | enough,
           ,          ,           ,          ,      ,
      For by | this knot | thou shalt | so sure|ly tie
           ,        ,        ,        ,         ,
      Thy now | unsured | assu|rance to | the crown,
            ,      ,    ,                     ,         ,
      That yon | green boy / shall have | no sun | to ripe
            ,           ,      ,        ,       ,
      The bloom | that pro|miseth | a migh|ty fruit.
         ,        ,        ,         ,           ,
      I see | a yiel|ding in | the looks | of France:
        ,               ,         ,           ,             ,
      Mark how | they whis|per: urge | them while | their souls
           ,    ,         ,       ,
      Are ca|pable | of this | ambi|tion,
      <-  ,       T    T   T       ,        ,        ,
        Lest || zeal, now mel|ted by | the win|dy breath
           ,       ,         ,     ,        ,
      Of soft | peti|tions, pi|ty and | remorse,
        ,             ,       ,         ,        ,
      Cool and | congeal | again | to what | it was.
 
FIRST CITIZEN
           ,       ,         ,       ,     ,
      Why an|swer not | the dou|ble ma|jesties,
              ,        ,      ,         ,           ,
      This friend|ly trea|ty of | our threa|tened town.
 
KING PHILIP
             ,         ,            ,          ,         ,
      Speak^Eng|land first,| that hath | been for|ward first
           ,        ,         ,             ,   ,
      To speak | unto | this ci|ty: what / say you?
 
KING JOHN
       ,             ,         ,            ,       ,
      If that | the Dau|phin there | thy prince|ly son,
       ,              ,         ,       ,        ,
      Can in | this book | of beau|ty read,| I love:
           ,               ,   ,        ,        ,
      Her dow|ry shall / weigh e|qual with | a queen:
         2    ,           ,         ,       T      T   T
      For Angiers,| and fair | Touraine,| Maine, Poictiers,
           ,          ,     ,           ,         ,
      And all | that we | upon | this side | the sea,
           ,          ,     ,        ,        ,
      (Except | this ci|ty now | by us | besieged)
            ,   ,      2      ,          ,     ,
      Find li|able | to our crown | and dig|nity,
              ,         ,       ,          ,          ,
      Shall gild | her bri|dal bed | and make | her rich
          ,        ,        ,        ,
      In ti|tles, ho|nors, and | promo|tions,
      <- ,     T   T   T      ,    ,         ,
        As || she in beau|ty, e|duca|tion, blood,
              ,         ,      ,    ,             ,
      Holds^hand | with a|ny prin|cess of | the world.
 
KING PHILIP
             ,           ,      ,            ,        ,
      What sayst | thou boy?| Look in | the la|dy's face.
 
LEWIS
         ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      I do | my lord,| and in | her eye | I find
         ,        ,      ,         ,    ,
      A won|der, or | a won|drous mi|racle,
           ,       ,       ,       ,             ,
      The sha|dow of | myself | formed in | her eye,
             ,      ,         ,       ,         ,
      Which^be|ing but | the sha|dow of | your son,
          ,        ,          ,           ,       ,       ->
      Becomes | a sun | and makes | your son | a sha||dow:
      ,     2     ,       ,       ,         ,
      I | do protest | I ne|ver loved | myself
            ,       ,     ,       ,        ,
      Till now | infix|ed I | beheld | myself,
        ,     2        ,          ,           ,   ,
      Drawn in the | flatte|ring ta|ble of / her eye.
 
[Whispers with BLANCH]
 
BASTARD
        ,     2        ,          ,           ,   ,
      Drawn in the | flatte|ring ta|ble of / her eye,
         ,              ,         ,            ,    ,
      Hanged in | the frow|ning wrin|kle of / her brow,
            ,         ,         ,          ,      ,
      And quar|tered in | her heart,| he doth | espy
           ,       ,     ,                  ,     ,
      Himself | love's trai/tor, this | is pi|ty now;
              ,           ,           ,          ,             ,
      That hanged,| and drawn,| and quar|tered there | should be
           ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      In such | a love | so vile | a lout | as he.
 
BLANCH
          ,         ,         ,        ,          ,
      My un|cle's will | in this | respect | is mine,
          ,         ,         ,           ,           ,
      If he | see aught | in you | that makes | him like,
           ,     ,          ,            ,          ,      ->
      That a|nything | he sees,| which moves | his li||king,
      ,    ,           ,         ,          2     ,
      I | can with | ease tran|slate it | to my will;
          ,         ,         ,           ,      ,
      Or if | you will,| to speak | more pro|perly,
      ,            ,         ,    ,     2     ,
      I will | enforce | it ea|sily | to my love.
       ,                  ,    ,       ,         ,
      Further | I will / not flat|ter you,| my lord,
            ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      That all | I see | in you | is wor|thy love,
             ,          ,        ,      ,        ,
      Than this,| that no|thing do | I see | in you,
               ,           ,             ,             ,          ,
      Though chur|lish thoughts | themselves | should be | your judge,
           ,         ,            ,     ,      ,
      That I | can find | should me|rit a|ny hate.
 
KING JOHN
            ,            ,       T     T   T       2     ,
      What say | these young | ones? What say | you my niece?
 
BLANCH
            ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      That she | is bound | in ho|nor still | to do
            ,        ,        ,           ,         ,
      What you | in wis|dom still | vouchsafe | to say.
 
KING JOHN
        T     T     T      ,           2      ,          ,     ->
      Speak then prince | Dauphin,| can you love | this la||dy?
 
LEWIS
       ,     ,          ,      2    ,            ,
      Nay | ask me | if I | can refrain | from love;
          ,        ,          ,        ,      ,
      For I | do love | her most | unfei|gnedly.
 
KING JOHN
            ,       ,         ,         ,          ,
      Then do | I give | Volques|sen, Tour|aine, Maine,
            ,          ,                 ,   ,      ,
      Poictiers | and An|jou*, these / five pro|vinces
            ,         ,          ,       ,        ,
      With her | to thee,| and this | addi|tion more,
              ,       ,         ,         ,         ,
      Full* thir|ty thou|sand marks | of Eng|lish coin:
       ,            ,           ,          ,          ,
      Philip | of France,| if thou | be pleased | withal,
           ,         ,          ,              ,    ,
      Command | thy son | and daugh|ter to / join hands.
 
KING PHILIP
           ,          ,            ,         ,            ,
      It likes | us well | young^prin|ces; close | your hands.
 
AUSTRIA
                   ,   ,        ,        ,        ,
      And your / lips too,| for I | am well | assured,
           ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      That I | did so | when I | was first | assured.
 
KING PHILIP
            ,     ,            ,    ,           ,
      Now* ci|tizens | of An/giers ope | your gates,
           ,        ,    ,          ,           ,
      Let^in | that a|mity | which you | have made,
           ,          ,       ,       ,       ,
      For at | Saint Ma|ry's cha|pel pre|sently,
            ,         ,          ,         ,      ,
      The rites | of mar|riage shall | be so|lemnized.
          ,         ,     ,          ,          ,
      Is not | the La|dy Con|stance in | this troop?
          ,       2    ,          ,      T     T   T
      I know | she is not,| for this | match made up
           ,          ,           ,     ,        ,
      Her pre|sence would | have in|terrup|ted much.
        ,         ,             ,      ,             ,
      Where is | she and | her son,| tell me,| who knows?
 
LEWIS
         2    ,         ,       ,      2       ,          ,
      She is sad | and pas|sionate | at your high|ness' tent.
 
KING PHILIP
           ,        ,             ,           ,          ,
      And by | my faith,| this league | that we | have made
             ,         ,        ,     ,        ,
      Will give | her sad|ness ve|ry lit|tle cure:
       ,            ,         ,         ,        ,
      Brother | of Eng|land, how | may we | content
            ,      ,      ,         ,          ,
      This wi|dow la|dy? In | her right | we came,
             ,         ,             ,       ,       ,
      Which^we | God^knows,| have turned | ano|ther way,
                ,   ,
      To our / own van|tage.
 
KING JOHN
                             ,          ,        ,
                            We | will heal | up all,
             ,        ,           ,        ,        ,       2->
      For we'll | create | young^Ar|thur Duke | of Bri||tain
            ,         ,                ,    ,            ,
      And Earl | of Rich|mond, and / this rich | fair* town
           ,          ,          ,         ,     ,      ,   ->
      We make | him lord | of. Call | the La|dy Con||stance;
               ,       ,    2      ,            ,
      Some | speedy | messenger*| bid her | repair
          ,       ,     ,       ,          ,
      To our | solem|nity:| I trust | we shall,
           ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      (If not | fill up | the mea|sure of | her will)
           ,         ,        ,     ,        ,
      Yet^in | some^mea|sure sa|tisfy | her so,
            ,           ,         ,     ,      o
      That we | shall stop | her ex|clama|tion.
       ,           ,         ,           ,       ,
      Go we | as well | as haste | will suf|fer us,
           ,         ,          ,     ,       ,
      To this | unlooked | for un|prepa|red pomp.
 
[Exeunt all but the BASTARD]
 
BASTARD
       T    T     T      T     T   T     ,       ->
      Mad world, mad | kings, mad com|posi||tion:
        ,         ,     ,          ,        2      ,
      John | to stop | Arthur's | title | in the whole,
            ,       ,      ,        ,        ,
      Hath wil|lingly | depar|ted with | a part,
             ,            ,      ,            ,       ,
      And France,| whose ar|mor con|science buck|led on,
             ,         ,     ,      ,               ,
      Whom zeal | and cha|rity | brought to | the field
           ,          ,          ,       ,        ,
      As God's | own^sol|dier, roun|ded in | the ear,
                    ,   ,         ,               ,    x
      With that / same pur|pose-chan|ger, that / sly devil,
            ,                ,      ,           ,         ,
      That bro|ker, that / still breaks | the pate | of faith,
            ,       ,     ,               ,        ,
      That dai|ly break-|vow, he | that wins | of all,
           ,         ,         ,            ,             ,
      Of kings,| of beg|gars, old | men*, young | men*, maids,
           ,       ,      ,        ,          ,
      Who ha|ving no | exter|nal thing | to lose,
                  ,    ,       ,                 ,         ,
      But the / word maid,| cheats the | poor* maid | of that.
        .     T     T    T     2      ,      2    ,    ,
      That smooth-faced gen|tleman, tick|ling Commo|dity,
          ,    ,        ,     ,         ,
      Commo|dity,| the bi|as of | the world,
            ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      The world,| who of | itself | is pei|sed well,
        ,        ,  ,         T   Tx     T
      Made to | run e/ven, u|pon even ground,
             ,       ,                 ,    ,       ,    2->
      Till this | advan|tage, this / vile-draw|ing bi||as,
             ,        ,         ,        ,    ,
      This sway | of mo|tion, this | commo|dity,
        T    .   T    T          ,       ,    2   ,
      Makes it take head | from all | indif|ferency,
            ,       ,         ,           ,         ,
      From all | direc|tion, pur|pose, course,| intent.
                   ,   ,       ,        ,    ,
      And this / same bi|as, this | commo|dity,
             ,          ,               ,    ,         ,
      This bawd,| this bro|ker, this / all-chan|ging word,
         ,              ,        ,         ,        ,
      Clapped on | the out|ward eye | of fick|le France,
             ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      Hath drawn | him from | his own | deter|mined aid,
        ,           ,          ,    ,      ,
      From a | resolved | and ho|nora|ble war,
               ,    ,          ,       ,        ,
      To a / most base | and vile-|conclu|ded peace.
           ,      ,           ,        ,    ,
      And why | rail I | on this | commo|dity?
       ,            ,       2      ,      T    T  T
      But for | because | he hath not | wooed me yet:
       ,             ,          x           ,          ,
      Not that | I have | the power | to clutch | my hand,
                   ,   ,        ,         ,         ,
      When his / fair an|gels would | salute | my palm,
           ,         ,        ,     ,       ,
      But for | my hand,| as un|attemp|ted yet,
       T   .   T   T        ,        ,         ,
      Like a poor beg|gar, rai|leth on | the rich.
        ,              ,      ,       ,          ,
      Well, whiles^|I am | a beg|gar, I | will rail,
           ,           ,       ,         ,        ,
      And say | there is | no sin | but to | be rich:
           ,       ,        ,        ,           ,
      And be|ing rich,| my vir|tue then | shall be,
          ,           ,        ,         ,     ,
      To say | there is | no vice,| but beg|gary:
              ,       T     T   . T        ,    ,
      Since^kings | break faith upon | commo|dity,
        ,            ,        ,         ,         ,
      Gain be | my lord,| for I | will wor|ship thee.
 
[Exit]

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