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King John

Act I, Scene 1

KING JOHN'S palace.
 
[Enter KING JOHN, QUEEN ELINOR, PEMBROKE, ESSEX, SALISBURY, and others, with CHATILLON]
 
KING JOHN
            ,        ,         ,             ,           ,
      Now* say | Chatil|lon, what | would France | with us?
 
CHATILLON
             ,       ,           ,           ,          ,
      Thus^(af|ter gree|ting) speaks | the King | of France
          ,      ,       ,        ,     ,
      In my | beha|vior to | the ma|jesty,
           ,         ,    ,        ,         ,
      The bor|rowed ma|jesty | of Eng|land here.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
           ,         ,         ,         ,    ,
      A strange | begin|ning: bor|rowed ma|jesty?
 
KING JOHN
       ,               ,         ,         ,     ,
      Silence |(good* mo|ther) hear | the em|bassy.
 
CHATILLON
       ,             ,          ,           ,        ,
      Philip | of France,| in right | and true | behalf
          ,       ,       ,         ,          ,
      Of thy | decea|sed bro|ther Geof|frey's son,
       ,            ,   2      ,          ,        ,
      Arthur | Planta|genet, lays | most^law|ful claim
        2       ,     ,        ,         ,     ,
      To this fair | island | and the | terri|tories,
          ,          ,          ,       ,           ,
      To Ire|land, Poic|tiers, An|jou, Tou|raine, Maine,
         ,        ,        ,       ,          ,
      Desi|ring thee | to lay | aside | the sword
              ,       ,     2      ,      ,         ,
      Which sways | usur|pingly* these | several | titles,
           ,            ,             ,    ,          ,
      And put | these same | into / young Ar|thur's hand,
           ,               ,    ,      ,     ,
      Thy ne|phew, and / right roy|al so|vereign.
 
KING JOHN
            ,        ,       ,     ,         ,
      What fol|lows if | we dis|allow | of this?
 
CHATILLON
            ,          ,          ,           ,      ,
      The proud | control | of fierce | and bloo|dy war,
        2     ,             ,         ,     ,          ,
      To enforce | these^rights | so for|cibly | withheld.
 
KING JOHN
        ,             ,         ,          ,           ,
      Here have | we war | for war,| and blood | for blood,
           ,    ,     2      ,            ,         ,
      Control|ment for con|trolment:| so an|swer France.
 
CHATILLON
             ,          ,        ,              ,   ,
      Then take | my king's | defi|ance from / my mouth,
           ,         ,      ,       ,     ,
      The far|thest li|mit of | my em|bassy.
 
KING JOHN
             ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      Bear mine | to him,| and so | depart | in peace,
       ,             ,         ,         ,          ,
      Be thou | as light|ning in | the eyes | of France;
           ,           ,         ,        ,         ,
      For ere | thou canst | report,| I will | be there:
            ,       ,       ,        ,          ,
      The thun|der of | my can|non shall | be heard.
           ,      ,              ,       ,         ,
      So hence:| Be thou | the trum|pet of | our wrath,
           ,       ,    ,             ,       ,
      And sul|len pre|sage of | your own | decay:
          ,             ,   ,   ,          ,
      An ho|norable // conduct let | him have,
       T   T      T      2      ,    ,        ,
      Pembroke, look | to it. Fare|well, Cha|tillon.
 
[Exeunt CHATILLON and PEMBROKE]
 
QUEEN ELINOR
            ,        ,         ,       ,       ,
      What now | my son,| have I | not e|ver said
       ,            ,        ,                  ,    ,
      How that | ambi|tious Con|stance would / not cease
        ,             ,          ,          ,          ,
      Till she | had kin|dled France | and all | the world,
        ,          ,          ,      ,        ,
      Upon | the right | and par|ty of | her son.
             ,            ,        ,              ,    ,
      This might | have been | preven|ted and / made whole
            ,     ,     ,     ,          ,
      With ve|ry ea|sy ar|guments | of love,
             ,         ,            ,    ,         ,
      Which now | the ma|nage of / two king|doms must
             ,        ,      ,      ,     ,
      With fear|ful bloo|dy is|sue ar|bitrate.
 
KING JOHN
             ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Our strong | posses|sion, and | our right | for us.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
              ,         ,         ,      ,                ,
      Your strong | posses|sion much | more than | your right,
           ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
      Or else | it must | go wrong | with you | and me,
           ,        ,            ,        ,         ,
      So much | my con|science whis|pers in | your ear,
              ,           x          ,        ,           ,
      Which none | but heaven,| and you,| and I,| shall hear.
 
[Enter a Sheriff]
 
ESSEX
           ,       ,    2        ,          ,      ,
      My liege,| here is the | strangest | contro|versy
        ,           ,        ,         ,        ___
      Come from | country | to be | judged by | you,
            ,        ,       ,            ,         ,
      That ere | I heard:| shall I | produce | the men?
 
KING JOHN
       ,            ,
      Let them approach:  ????
           ,       ,         ,     ,           ,
      Our ab|beys and | our pri|ories | shall pay
            ,    ,           ,           ,         ,
      This^ex|pedi|tion's charge.| What men | are you?
 
[Enter ROBERT and the BASTARD]
 
BASTARD
             ,        ,        ,      ,      ,
      Your faith|ful sub|ject, I | a gen|tleman,
        ,             ,       ,          ,       ,
      Born in | Northamp|tonshire | and el|dest son
         ,        ,        ,        ,        ,
      As I | suppose,| to Ro|bert Faul|conbridge,
         ,        ,        ,      ,        ,
      A sol|dier by | the ho|nor-gi|ving hand
           ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      Of Coeur-|de-li|on knigh|ted in | the field.
 
KING JOHN
            ,
      What art thou?   ????
 
ROBERT
           ,          ,                ,    ,        ,
      The son | and heir | to that / same Faul|conbridge.
 
KING JOHN
           ,         ,             ,    ,          ,
      Is that | the el|der, and / art thou | the heir?
            ,     ,            ,        ,         ,
      You came | not of | one^mo|ther then | it seems.
 
BASTARD
            ,             ,   ,         ,       ,
      Most cer|tain of / one mo|ther, migh|ty king,
        T   .   T    T      ,    2      ,          ,
      That is well known,| and as I | think, one^|father:
       ,             ,         ,         ,          ,
      But for | the cer|tain know|ledge of | that truth,
         ,         ,          x      ,    2      ,
      I put | you ore | to heaven | and to my | mother;
           ,        ,         ,            ,        ,
      Of that | I doubt,| as all | men's^chil|dren may.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
       ,         T    T   T        2       ,          ,      2->
      Out on | thee rude man,| thou dost^shame | thy mo||ther
            ,          ,       ,          ,      ,
      And wound | her ho|nor with | this dif|fidence.
 
BASTARD
      T   Tx    T    2      ,    ,        ,
      I madam? No,| I have no | reason | for it,
        ,           ,           ,          ,         ,
      That is | my bro|ther's plea,| and none | of mine,
            ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      The which | if he | can prove,| he pops | me out,
           ,            ,          ,         ,         ,
      At least | from fair | five^hun|dred pound | a year:
       ,         ,         ,          ,         2     ,
      Heaven | guard my | mother's | honor,| and my land.
 
KING JOHN
      .   T    T    T        ,      2     ,        ,
      A good blunt fel|low: why | being youn|ger born
            ,         ,          ,        ,     ,
      Doth^he | lay claim | to thine | inhe|ritance?
 
BASTARD
          ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      I know | not why,| except | to get | the land:
            ,         ,         ,         ,      ,
      But once | he slan|dered me | with bas|tardy:
            ,        ,        ,       ,        ,
      But where | I be | as true | begot | or no,
             ,        ,      ,        ,          ,
      That still | I lay | upon | my mo|ther's head,
            ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      But that | I am | as well | begot | my liege
         T    T   .    T            ,          ,          ,
      (Fair fall the bones | that took | the pains | for me)
           ,         ,       ,         ,           ,
      Compare | our fa|ces, and | be judge | yourself.
          ,         ,       ,       ,         ,
      If old | sir Ro|bert did | beget | us both,
            ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      And were | our fa|ther, and | this son | like him:
          ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      Oh^old | sir Ro|bert fa|ther, on | my knee
          ,     ,          ,    2       T    T   .   T
      I give | heaven | thanks I was | not like to thee.
 
KING JOHN
       ,            ,   ,           Tx      Tx     T
      Why what | a mad|cap hath | heaven lent us here?
 
QUEEN ELINOR
           ,        ,          ,        ,        ,
      He hath | a trick | of Coeur-|de-li|on's face;
           ,       ,          ,        ,        ,
      The ac|cent of | his tongue | affec|teth him:
       ,             ,          ,       ,       ,
      Do you | not read | some to|kens of | my son
                 ,    ,     ,       ,         ,
      In the / large com|posi|tion of | this man?
 
KING JOHN
            ,           ,      ,     ,         ,
      Mine eye | hath well | exa|mined | his parts,
            ,           ,        ,         ,        ,
      And finds | them per|fect Ri|chard: Sir|rah speak,
        ,           ,             ,           ,           ,
      What doth | move you | to claim | your bro|ther's land.
 
BASTARD
          ,            2      ,    ,      ,        ,
      Because | he hath a / half-face | like my | father:
             ,           ,           ,         ,         ,
      With half | that face | would he | have all | my land:
      .   T    T     T           ,         ,         .
      A half-faced groat,| five^hun|dred pound | a year?
 
ROBERT
          ,          ,       ,             ,        ,
      My gra|cious liege,| when that | my fa|ther lived,
            ,        ,        ,        ,        ,
      Your bro|ther did | employ | my fa|ther much.
 
BASTARD
        ,             ,         ,       ,         ,
      Well sir,| by this | you can|not get | my land,
             ,          ,    ,    2      ,         ,
      Your tale | must be | how he em|ployed my | mother.
 
ROBERT
            ,          ,           ,       ,     ,
      And once | dispatched | him in | an em|bassy
          ,     ,     ,               ,    ,
      To Ger|many,| there with | the em|peror
           ,          ,        ,       ,               ,
      To treat | of high | affairs | touching | that time:
         2   ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      The advan|tage of | his ab|sence took | the king,
       ,    2        T   T   T     ,     2      ,
      And in the | meantime so|journed at my | father's;
             ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      Where how | he did | prevail,| I shame | to speak,
            ,          ,       T      T     .   T           ,
      But truth | is truth,| large lengths of seas | and shores
          ,         ,       ,        ,       ,
      Between | my fa|ther and | my mo|ther lay,
         ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      As I | have heard | my fa|ther speak | himself,
                    ,   ,      ,      ,         ,
      When this / same lus|ty gen|tleman | was got:
        ,          ,     ,            ,          ,
      Upon | his death-|bed he | by will | bequeathed
            ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      His lands | to me,| and took | it on | his death
             ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      That this | my mo|ther's son | was none | of his;
           ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      And if | he were,| he came | into | the world
        T    Tx       T         ,           ,          ,
      Full fourteen weeks | before | the course | of time.  ??
             ,         ,      ,         ,              ,
      Then good | my liege | let me | have what | is mine,
          ,          ,        ,        ,          ,
      My fa|ther's land,| as was | my fa|ther's will.
 
KING JOHN
       ,             ,        ,      ,     ,
      Sirrah,| your bro|ther is | legi|timate;
            ,          ,         ,      ,    T    T   T
      Your fa|ther's wife | did af|ter wed|lock bear him,
       T   T  T     T    T    T           ,           ,
      And if she | did play false,| the fault | was hers,  (hex with prev)
              ,       ,    2       ,            ,     ,
      Which fault | lies on the | hazards | of all | husbands
            ,       ,       ,        ,    2      ,
      That mar|ry wives:| tell me,| how if my | brother
       ,            ,           ,         ,          ,
      Who as | you say,| took pains | to get | this son,
           ,         ,         ,            ,         ,
      Had of | your fa|ther claimed | this son | for his,
           ,              ,           ,        ,            ,
      In sooth,| good* friend,| your fa|ther might | have kept
             ,      ,              ,          ,          ,
      This calf,| bred from | his cow | from all | the world:
           ,          ,       ,    2       ,        ,
      In sooth | he might:| then if he | were my | brother's,
          ,         ,           ,           ,          ,      ->
      My bro|ther might | not claim | him, nor | your fa||ther,
        x       ,        ,        ,            2      ,
      Being | none of | his, re|fuse him:| this concludes;
          ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      My mo|ther's son | did get | your fa|ther's heir,
            ,          ,           ,          ,          ,
      Your fa|ther's heir | must have | your fa|ther's land.
 
ROBERT
              ,        ,          ,             ,   ,
      Shall then | my fa|ther's will | be of / no force,
          ,       ,           ,                 ,   ,
      To dis|possess | that child | which is / not his?
 
BASTARD
          ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      Of no | more force | to dis|possess | me sir,
            ,          ,        ,         ,       ,
      Than was | his will | to get | me, as | I think.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
       ,          ,           ,         2    ,        ,
      Whether | hadst thou | rather | be a Faul|conbridge,
            ,         ,        ,      ,          ,
      And like | thy bro|ther to | enjoy | thy land:
       ,    2    ,       ,         ,        ,
      Or the re|puted | son of | Coeur-de-|lion,
        ,            ,         ,         ,        ,
      Lord of | thy pre|sence and | no land | beside?
 
BASTARD
       ,           ,       ,        ,         ,
      Madam,| and if | my bro|ther had | my shape
          ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      And I | had his,| sir Ro|bert's his | like him,
           ,        ,          ,          ,        ,
      And if | my legs | were two | such^ri|ding-rods,
           ,          ,            ,           ,         ,
      My arms | such^eel-|skins^stuffed,| my face | so thin,
            ,         ,        ,           ,         ,
      That in | mine^ear | I durst | not stick | a rose,
            ,            ,      ,                  ,           ,
      Lest men | should say,| look where | three* far|things goes.
           ,         ,            ,        ,           ,
      And to | his shape | were heir | to all | this land,
            ,          ,       ,          ,           ,
      Would I | might ne|ver stir | from off | this place,
       2        ,       ,        ,         ,           ,
      I would give | it e|very foot | to have | this face:
           ,          ,        ,       ,      ,
      It would | not be | sir Nob | in a|ny case.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
          ,           ,      ,      2      ,         ,
      I like | thee well:| wilt thou for|sake thy | fortune,
           ,           ,        ,         ,       ,
      Bequeath | thy land | to him | and fol|low me?
      ,         ,               ,    ,           ,
      I am | a sol|dier, and / now bound | to France.
 
BASTARD
       ,          ,             ,           ,          ,
      Brother,| take you | my land,| I'll take | my chance;
             ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      Your face | hath got | five^hun|dred pound | a year,
            ,           ,          ,            ,          ,
      Yet sell | your face | for five | pence* and |'tis dear.
       ,            ,       ,       ,         ,
      Madam,| I'll fol|low you | unto | the death.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
       ,    2          ,         ,      ,        ,
      Nay, I would | have you | go be|fore me | thither.
 
BASTARD
            ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
      Our coun|try man|ners give | our bet|ters way.
 
KING JOHN
        ,           ,
      What is thy name?  ????
 
BASTARD
       ,            ,         ,        ,       ,
      Philip | my liege,| so is | my name | begun,
       ,         ,     2       ,                 ,       ,
      Philip,| good old sir | Robert's | wife's^el|dest son.
 
KING JOHN
             ,            ,          ,            ,            ,
      From hence|forth* bear | his name | whose form | thou bearst:
        ,            ,   ,               T    T    T
      Kneel thou | down Phi/lip, but | rise more great,
         ,         ,        ,         ,    ,
      Arise | sir Ri|chard and | Planta|genet.
 
BASTARD
       ,          2     ,          ,      ,              ,
      Brother | by the mo|ther's side,| give me | your hand,
          ,        ,        ,        ,            ,
      My fa|ther gave | me ho|nor, yours | gave land:
            ,       ,         ,         ,         ,
      Now bles|sed by | the hour | by night | or day
           ,        ,         ,       ,      ,
      When I | was got,| sir Ro|bert was | away.
 
QUEEN ELINOR
           ,     ,       ,        ,    ,
      The ve|ry spi|rit of | Planta|genet:
      ,            ,       ,          ,        ,
      I am | thy gran|dam Ri|chard, call | me so.
 
BASTARD
       ,            ,          ,         ,       ,
      Madam | by chance | but not | by truth,| what though;
        ,            ,       ,        ,          ,
      Something | about | a lit|tle from | the right,
       ,           ,              ,   ,          ,
      In at | the win|dow, or / else ore | the hatch:
            ,           ,        ,           ,         ,
      Who dares | not stir | by day | must walk | by night,
            ,         ,       ,      ,         ,
      And have | is have,| howe|ver men | do catch:
        ,            ,          ,         ,            ,
      Near or | far^off,| well-won | is still | well-shot,
          ,      ,       ,       ,       ,
      And I | am I,| howere | I was | begot.
 
KING JOHN
       T    T  .    T           ,          ,        ,
      Go, Faulconbridge:| now hast | thou thy | desire;
          ,          ,             ,       ,         ,
      A land|less knight | makes thee | a lan|ded squire.
            ,              ,   ,         ,          ,
      Come^ma|dam, and / come Ri|chard, we | must speed
             ,            ,          ,        ,           ,
      For France,| for France,| for it | is more | than need.
 
BASTARD
       ,           ,          ,         ,         ,
      Brother | adieu:| good for|tune come | to thee,
            ,          ,      2     ,        ,     ,
      For thou | wast got | in the way | of ho|nesty.
 
[Exeunt all but BASTARD]
          ,        ,      ,             ,  ,
      A foot | of ho|nor bet|ter than / I was,
           ,   2   ,      ,         ,          ,
      But ma|ny a ma|ny foot | of land | the worse.
        ,    ,              ,   2      ,       ,
      Well, now / can I | make any | Joan a | lady,
        ,     2       ,         ,      ,       ,
      Good^den sir | Richard,| God-a-|mercy | fellow,
       ,    2        ,          ,             ,         ,
      And if his | name be | George, I'll | call him | Peter;
           ,         ,       ,        ,            ,
      For new-|made^ho|nor doth | forget | men's^names:
            ,        ,               ,   ,     ,
      'Tis too | respec|tive, and / too so|ciable
            ,        ,         ,          ,      ,
      For your | conver|sion, now | your tra|veller,
       ,             ,     ,           ,           ,
      He and | his tooth|pick at | my wor|ship's mess,
            ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      And when | my knight|ly sto|mach is | sufficed,
            ,        ,         ,          ,     ,
      Why then | I suck | my teeth | and ca|techise
            ,      ,         ,          T   T   T
      My picked | man of | countries:| My dear sir,
            ,        ,         ,     ,      ,
      Thus lea|ning on | mine el|bow I | begin,
          ,         ,            ,         ,        ,
      I shall | beseech | you; that | is ques|tion now,
            ,           ,        ,        ,       ,
      And then | comes an|swer like | an Ab|sey book:
         ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      O sir,| says^an|swer, at | your best | command,
           ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      At your | employ|ment, at | your ser|vice sir:
       ,              ,        ,           ,         ,
      No sir,| says^ques|tion, I | sweet* sir | at yours,
           ,        ,        ,            ,         ,
      And so | ere an|swer knows | what ques|tion would,
       ,           ,    ,         ,       ,
      Saving | in di|alogue | of com|pliment,
           ,        ,         ,         ,     ,
      And tal|king of | the Alps | and Ap|ennines,
           ,    ,     ,         ,      ,
      The Py|rene|an and | the ri|ver Po,
           ,             ,       ,       ,        ,
      It draws | toward sup|per in | conclu|sion so.
            ,        ,       ,       ,   ,
      But this | is wor|shipful | soci|ety,
            ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      And fits | the moun|ting spi|rit like | myself;
           ,       ,       ,        ,         ,
      For he | is but | a bas|tard to | the time
             ,          ,         ,     ,      o
      That doth | not smack | of ob|serva|tion;
           ,      ,    ,            ,         ,
      And so | am I | whether | I smack | or no:
           ,       ,        ,      ,        ,
      And not | alone | in ha|bit and | device,
         ,   2    ,     ,           ,       ,
      Exte|rior form,| outward | accou|trement;
       ,      2       ,        ,        ,     ,
      But from the | inward | motion | to de|liver
        T      T      T      ,          2    ,        ,
      Sweet, sweet, sweet | poison | for the a|ge's tooth:
               ,         ,          ,        ,       ,
      Which though | I will | not prac|tise to | deceive,
       ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      Yet to | avoid | deceit | I mean | to learn;
           ,           ,           ,    ,     2      ,
      For it | shall strew | the foot|steps of my | rising.
           ,      ,               ,         ,        ,
      But who | comes in | such haste | in ri|ding robes?
            ,       ,         ,      ,     2      ,
      What wo|man-post | is this?| Hath she no | husband
          2       ,      ,          ,        ,       ,
      That will take | pains to | blow a | horn be|fore her?
 
[Enter LADY FAULCONBRIDGE and GURNEY]
         ,     ,        ,            ,           ,    ->
      O me,| 'tis my | mother:| How now | good* la||dy,
        ,       ,             2     ,         ,     ,
      What | brings you | here to court | so has|tily?
 
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE
        ,               ,          ,          ,      ,
      Where is | that slave | thy bro|ther? Where | is he?
             ,          ,           ,      ,         ,
      That holds | in chase | mine ho|nor up | and down.
 
BASTARD
          ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      My bro|ther Ro|bert, old | sir Ro|bert's son:
            ,          ,               ,    ,      ,
      *Colbrand | the gi|ant, that / same migh|ty man,
       ,           ,         ,                 ,   ,
      Is it | sir Ro|bert's son | that you / seek so?
 
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE
           ,         ,     ,            ,         ,
      Sir Ro|bert's son,| aye, thou un|reve|rend boy,
           ,         ,           ,        ,    2       ,
      Sir Ro|bert's son?| Why scornst | thou at sir | Robert?
       ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      He is | sir Ro|bert's son,| and so | art thou.
 
BASTARD
        ,    ,                     ,         ,         ,
      James Gur/ney, wilt | thou give | us leave | awhile?
 
GURNEY
             ,           ,
      Good leave,| good Phi|lip.
 
BASTARD
                                 ,        ,          ,
                                Phi|lip, spar|row, James,
                ,       ,       ,           ,           ,
      There's^toys | abroad:| anon | I'll tell | thee more.
 
[Exit GURNEY]
       ,               ,   ,         ,         ,
      Madam,| I was / not old | sir Ro|bert's son,
           ,        ,           ,          ,        ,
      Sir Ro|bert might | have eat | his part | in me
        ,           ,              ,    ,           ,
      Upon | Good* Fri|day and / nere broke | his fast:
           ,        ,          ,     ,        2     ,
      Sir Ro|bert could | do well,| marry | to confess
        ,         ,            ,               ,    x
      Could he | get me?| Sir Ro|bert could / not do it:
           ,         ,      ,      ,      2        ,
      We know | his han|diwork:| therefore good*| mother
           ,       ,      ,        ,            ,
      To whom | am I | behol|ding for | these^limbs?
           ,       ,       ,         ,          ,
      Sir Ro|bert ne|ver holp | to make | this leg.
 
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE
             ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      Hast thou | conspi|red with | thy bro|ther too,
        ,     2        ,    ,                  ,         ,
      That for thine^|own gain / shouldst de|fend mine^|honor?
             ,            ,            ,           ,    ,
      What means | this scorn,| thou most | unto/ward knave?
 
BASTARD
        __        ,           ,        ,    ,      __
      Knight,| knight good*| mother,| Basi|lisco-|like:
       __    ,        ,          ,        ,        ,
      What,| I am | dubbed, I | have it | on my | shoulder:  (hex with prev?)
           ,       ,       ,         ,         ,
      But mo|ther, I | am not | sir Ro|bert's son,
      ,              ,           ,       ,         ,
      I have | disclaimed | sir Ro|bert and | my land,
         ,    ,         ,         ,         ,
      Legi|tima|tion, name,| and all | is gone;
             ,        ,        ,         ,        ,       o
      Then good | my mo|ther, let | me know | my fa|ther,
            ,       ,        ,         ,        ,       o
      Some pro|per man | I hope,| who was | it mo|ther?   (hex with prev)
 
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE
             ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      Hast thou | denied | thyself | a Faul|conbridge?
 
BASTARD
           ,       ,      ,      ,         x
      As faith|fully | as I | deny | the devil.
 
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE
            ,         ,         x     ,         ,
      King^Ri|chard Coeur-|de-lion | was thy | father:
           ,         ,   2      ,    ,           ,
      By long | and ve|hement suit | I was | seduced
           ,      ,         ,           ,          ,
      To make | room for | him in | my hus|band's bed:
        Tx    T   T     ,         ,          2      ,
      Heaven lay not | my trans|gression | to my charge,
            ,         ,      ,        ,        ,
      That art | the is|sue of | my dear | offense
             ,          ,        ,           ,       ,
      Which was | so strong|ly urged | past^my | defense.  ??
 
BASTARD
           ,          ,          ,       ,       ,
      Now by | this light,| were I | to get | again,
       ,      ,      2        ,       ,        ,
      Madam | I would not | wish a | better | father.
              ,         ,           ,      ,         ,
      Some* sins | do bear | their pri|vilege | on earth,
           ,          ,            ,          ,          ,      ->
      And so | doth^yours:| your fault,| was not | your fol||ly:
        ,         2     ,           ,         ,         ,
      Needs | must you lay | your heart | at his | dispose,
          ,       ,    ,           ,         ,
      Subjec|ted tri|bute to | comman|ding love,
          ,            ,           , ,         ,
      Against | whose^fu|ry and / unmat|ched force
           ,        ,      ,           ,          ,
      The awe|less li|on could | not wage | the fight,
            ,           ,        ,           ,           ,
      Nor keep | his prince|ly heart | from Ri|chard's hand:
       ,     2      T     T   T      ,            ,
      He that per|force robs li|ons of | their hearts
           ,   2   ,       ,         ,        ,      o
      May ea|sily win | a wo|man's: aye | my mo|ther,
            ,         ,         ,           ,        ,      o
      With all | my heart | I thank | thee for | my fa|ther:  (hex with prev)
            ,           ,          ,           ,           ,
      Who lives | and dares | but say | thou didst | not well
           ,        ,           ,          ,         ,
      When I | was got,| I'll send | his soul | to hell.
            ,    ,          ,          ,       ,
      Come^la|dy I | will show | thee to | my kin,
            ,           ,          ,        ,      ,
      And they | shall say,| when Ri|chard me | begot,
           ,            ,         ,        ,          ,
      If thou | hadst said | him nay,| it had | been sin,
            ,        ,         ,       ,          ,
      Who says | it was,| he lies,| I say |'twas not.
 
[Exeunt]

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