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Henry V

Act IV, Prologue

CHORUS
           ,      ,        ,        ,       ,
      Now en|tertain | conjec|ture of | a time,
             ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      When cree|ping mur|mur and | the pour|ing dark
        ,           ,   ,               ,     ,
      Fills the | wide ves/sel of | the u|niverse.
             ,         ,                    ,    ,         ,
      From camp | to camp | through the / foul womb | of night
           ,        ,       ,      ,        ,
      The hum | of ei|ther ar|my stil|ly sounds,
                   ,    ,      ,     ,           ,
      That the / fixed sen|tinels | almost | receive
           ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      The se|cret whis|pers of | each o|ther's watch.
       __     ,         __           ,             ,       ,
      Fire | answers | fire,| and through | their pa|ly flames
        T    Tx     T        ,         ,         ,
      Each battle sees | the o|ther's um|bered face.
       ___      ,          ___         ,          ,          ,
      Steed | threatens | steed,| in high | and boast|ful neighs (match prev)
        ,     2         T      T   T          ,          ,
      Piercing the | night's dull ear:| and from | the tents,
           ,     ,       ,       ,            ,
      The ar|morers | accom|plishing | the knights,
            ,     ,        ,        ,       ,
      With bu|sy ham|mers clo|sing ri|vets up,
             ,         ,        ,     ,       o
      Give^dread|ful note | of pre|para|tion.
            ,        ,          ,           ,          ,
      The coun|try cocks | do crow,| the clocks | do toll:
                  ,     ,         ,      ,         ,
      And the / third hour | of drow|sy mor|ning named.
        ,               ,         ,        ,         ,
      Proud of | their num|bers, and | secure | in soul,
           ,      ,        ,      ,        ,
      The con|fident | and o|ver-lus|ty French,
                ,   ,      ,         ,         ,
      Do the / low-ra|ted Eng|lish play | at dice;
            ,           ,       ,      ,        ,
      And chide | the crip|ple tar|dy-gai|ted night,
       ,            ,         ,      ,            ,
      Who like^|a foul | and ug|ly witch | doth limp
          ,   2     2  ,          ,         ,       ,
      So te|dious|ly^away.| The poor | condemned | English,  ??
        T   T  . T       ,           ,         ,
      Like sacrifi|ces, by | their watch|ful fires
           ,       ,        ,     ,     ,
      Sit pa|tiently | and in|ly ru|minate
           ,          ,        ,           ,        ,
      The mor|ning's dan|ger: and | their ges|ture sad,
         ,    .    T    T     T      .   T    T    T
      Inves|ting lank-lean cheeks,| and war-worn coats,
          ,        ,     ,          ,        ,
      Presen|ted them | unto | the ga|zing moon
          ,     ,         ,        ,     ,             ,
      So ma|ny hor|rid ghosts.| O now,| who will | behold  ????
           ,      ,        ,         ,        ,
      The ro|yal cap|tain of | this ru|ined band
       ,               ,          ,            ,         ,
      Walking | from watch | to watch,| from tent | to tent;
       ,         T      T    .   T      ,         ,
      Let him | cry, Praise and glo|ry on | his head:
            ,          ,         ,       ,          ,
      For forth | he goes,| and vi|sits all | his host,
        ,               ,        ,       ,        ,
      Bids them | good mor|row with | a mo|dest smile,
            ,           ,            ,            ,      ,
      And calls | them bro|thers, friends,| and coun|trymen.
        ,         ,       ,                ,   ,
      Upon | his roy|al face | there is / no note
            ,         ,      ,        ,       ,
      How dread | an ar|my hath | enroun|ded him;
            ,        ,     ,         ,        ,     ->
      Nor doth | he de|dicate | one jot | of co||lor
       ,   2     ,            ,   ,         ,
      Un|to the wea|ry and / all-wat|ched night:
            ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      But fresh|ly looks,| and o|ver-bears | attaint,
             ,        ,                  ,    ,    ,
      With cheer|ful sem|blance, and / sweet ma|jesty:
            ,        ,      ,             ,        ,
      That ev|ery wretch,| pining | and pale | before,
         ,                ,    ,         ,          ,
      Behol|ding him,/ plucks com|fort from | his looks.
      .  T   T  T    ,        ,         ,
      A largess u|niver|sal like | the sun
           ,   2    ,           ,        ,      ,
      His li|beral eye | doth give | to ev|ery one,
         Tx     T    T           ,         ,       ,
      Thawing cold fear,| that mean | and gen|tle all
          ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      Behold,| as may | unwor|thiness | define.
         ,        ,         ,      ,         ,
      A lit|tle touch | of Har|ry in | the night,
           ,         ,           ,        ,       ,
      And so | our scene | must^to | the bat|tle fly:
        T    T  .   T      ,           ,         ,
      Where, O for pi|ty, we | shall much | disgrace,
             ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      With four | or five | most vile | and rag|ged foils,
         T    T   .   T          ,        ,     ,
      (Right ill-disposed,| in brawl | ridi|culous)
            ,       ,      ,          ,         ,
      The name | of A|gincourt:| yet sit | and see,
         Tx     T     T          ,            ,    2    ,
      Minding true things | by what | their mock|eries be.
 
[Exit]

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