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Henry VI part two

Act V, Scene 1

Fields between Dartford and Blackheath.
 
[Enter YORK, and his army of Irish, with drum and colors]
 
YORK
            ,         ,            ,         ,           ,
      From Ire|land thus | comes York | to claim | his right,
            ,           ,           ,       ,         ,
      And pluck | the crown | from fee|ble Hen|ry's head.
        T    T   .  T           ,    T      T    .     T
      Ring bells aloud;| burn* bon|fires, clear and bright,
          ,      ,           ,          ,        ,
      To en|tertain | great^Eng|land's law|ful king.
           ,    2   ,        ,         2     ,           ,
      Ah sanc|ta majes|tas! Who | would not buy | thee dear?
       ,           ,           ,         ,         ,
      Let them | obey,| that know | not how | to rule.
             ,          ,        ,         ,           ,
      This hand | was made | to han|dle naught | but gold.
         ,        ,         ,       ,        ,
      I can|not give | due^ac|tion to | my words,
          ,        ,          ,       ,        ,
      Except | a sword | or scep|ter ba|lance it.
          ,        ,          ,         ,       ,
      A scep|ter shall | it have,| have I | a soul,
       ,                ,          x          ,          ,
      On which | I'll toss | the flower-|de-luce | of France.
        ,              ,      ,      ,            ,
      Whom have | we here?| Bucking|ham to | disturb me?
            ,           ,          ,        ,        ,      ->
      The king | hath sent | him sure:| I must | dissem||ble.
 
[Enter BUCKINGHAM]
 
BUCKINGHAM
        ,      2      ,         ,        ,            ,
      York,| if thou mea|nest well,| I greet | thee well.
 
YORK
        ,     2       ,      ,    2     ,          ,
      Humphrey of | Bucking|ham, I ac|cept thy | greeting.
       ,      2     ,      ,          ,         ,
      Art thou a | messen|ger, or | come of | pleasure.
 
BUCKINGHAM
         ,      ,          ,              ,     ,
      A mes|senger | from Hen|ry, our / dread liege,
           ,         ,             ,     ,         ,
      To know | the rea|son of / these arms | in peace;
          ,      ,     2        ,    ,       ,
      Or why | thou, being | a sub|ject as | I am,
          ,           ,          ,       ,          ,
      Against | thy oath | and true | alle|giance sworn,
               ,          ,         x          ,          ,
      Should raise | so great | a power | without | his leave?
           ,         ,           ,          ,          ,
      Or dare | to bring | thy force | so near | the court?
 
YORK [Aside]
         ,             ,         ,            ,   ,
      Scarce can | I speak,| my cho|ler is / so great.
       ,            ,         ,           ,            ,
      Oh I | could hew | up rocks,| and fight | with flint,
              ,  ,  ,    2        T  T    T
      I am / so an|gry at these^|abject terms.
           ,         ,      ,    ,    ,
      And now | like A|jax Te|lamo|nius,
           ,         ,  ,      2      ,         ,
      On sheep | or ox|en could I | spend my | fury.
              ,   ,        ,          ,         ,
      I am / far bet|ter born | than is | the king:
             ,        ,           ,      ,          ,
      More^like | a king,| more king|ly in | my thoughts.
       ,   2         T    T   T        ,        ,
      But I must | make fair wea|ther yet | a while,
            ,      ,           ,        ,            ,
      Till Hen|ry be | more* weak | and I | more* strong.
        ,      ,        ,         ,       __
      Bucking|ham, I | prithee,| pardon | me,
           ,          x         ,       ,           ,
      That I | have given | no an|swer all | this while:
           ,          ,      2       ,     ,     ,
      My mind | was trou|bled with deep | melan|choly.
            ,      ,   2          ,            ,      ,
      The cause | why I have | brought this | army | hither,
       ,   2     T    T    T     ,        2      ,
      Is to re|move proud Som|erset | from the king,
         ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
      Sedi|tious to | his grace | and to | the state.
 
BUCKINGHAM
        ,        ,              ,             ,    ,
      That is | too much | presump|tion on / thy part:
           ,         ,        ,      ,       ,
      But if | thy arms | be to | no o|ther end,
            ,           ,       ,     ,        ,
      The king | hath yiel|ded un|to thy | demand:
            ,        ,     ,        ,         x
      The Duke | of So|merset | is in | the Tower.
 
YORK
        ,           ,      ,       ,     ,
      Upon | thine^ho|nor is | he pri|soner?
 
BUCKINGHAM
        ,          ,      ,       ,     ,
      Upon | mine^ho|nor he | is pri|soner.
 
YORK
             ,      ,       ,       ,           x
      Then Buck|ingham | I do | dismiss | my powers.
       ,             ,          ,         ,            ,
      Soldiers,| I thank | you all:| disperse | yourselves;
        ,          ,             ,     ,         ,
      Meet me | tomor|row in / Saint Geor|ge's field,
       ,                ,         ,      ,           ,
      You shall | have pay,| and ev|erything | you wish.
           ,        ,   2       ,     ,     ,
      And let | my so|vereign, vir|tuous | Henry,
           ,        ,       ,         ,         ,
      Command | my el|dest son,| nay^all | my sons,
           ,       ,       ,    ,         ,
      As pled|ges of | my fe|alty | and love,
             ,          ,        ,        ,       ,
      I'll send | them all | as wil|ling as | I live:
        T      T      T      ,      ,  2            ,
      Lands, goods, horse,| armor,| any thing | I have,
          ,        ,        ,     ,         ,
      Is his | to use,| so So|merset | may die.
 
BUCKINGHAM
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      York, I commend this kind submission:
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      We twain will go into his highness' tent.
 
[Enter KING HENRY VI and Attendants]
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,   2             ,        ,         ,        ,
      Buckingham,| doth York | intend | no harm | to us,
             ,        ,          ,          ,        ,
      That thus | he mar|cheth with | thee arm | in arm?
 
YORK
          ,        ,        ,       ,    ,
      In all | submis|sion and | humi|lity,
        ,             ,          ,     ,  2         ,
      York doth | present | himself | unto your | highness.
 
KING HENRY VI
             ,        ,            ,        ,           ,
      Then what | intends | these for|ces thou | dost bring?
 
YORK
           ,           ,       ,     ,           ,
      To heave | the tra|itor So|merset | from hence,
            ,         ,           ,          ,       ,
      And fight | against | that mon|strous re|bel Cade,
            ,         ,         ,       ,     ,
      Who since | I heard | to be | discom|fited.
 
[Enter IDEN, with CADE'S head]
 
IDEN
          ,         ,         ,        ,        ,      ->
      If one | so rude | and of | so mean | condi||tion
              ,   ,   2     ,         ,       ,
      May / pass in|to the pre|sence of | a king:
       ,           ,           ,         ,          ,
      Lo, I | present | your grace | a trai|tor's head,
            ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      The head | of Cade,| whom I | in com|bat* slew.
 
KING HENRY VI
            ,         ,           ,          ,          ,
      The head | of Cade?| Great^God,| how just | art Thou?
          ,         ,         ,        ,       ,
      Oh let | me view | his vi|sage, be|ing dead,
            ,         ,           ,       ,         ,      ->
      That li|ving wrought | me such | excee|ding trou||ble.
        ,               ,     ,      ,         ,            ,      ->
      Tell | me my / friend, art | thou the | man that || slew him?
 
IDEN
         ,       2     ,          ,     ,
      I was,| and it like | your ma|jesty.
 
KING HENRY VI
           ,            ,           ,        ,        ,
      How art | thou called?| And what | is thy | degree?
 
IDEN
      ,     ,      ,         ,          ,
      Alex|ander | Iden,| that's my | name,
      <-       T   T  T          ,           ,           ,
        A || poor esquire | of Kent,| that loves | his king.
 
BUCKINGHAM
            ,         ,         ,            ,       ,
      So please | it you | my lord,| 'twere not | amiss
       ,           ,        ,        2      ,     ,
      He were | crea|ted knight | for his good | service.
 
KING HENRY VI
      ,        T     T     T     ,       __
      Iden,| kneel down, rise | up a | knight:
           ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      We give | thee for | reward | a thou|sand marks,
            ,           ,           ,         ,        ,
      And will | that thou | henceforth | attend | on us.
 
IDEN
          ,       ,         x       ,        ,
      May I|den live | to merit | such a | bounty,
           ,       ,          ,       ,         ,
      And ne|ver live | but true | unto | his liege.
 
[Rises. Enter QUEEN MARGARET and SOMERSET]
 
KING HENRY VI
            ,      ,     ,   2       ,                ,
      See Buck|ingham,| Somerset | comes with | the queen,
          ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
      Go bid | her hide | him quick|ly from | the duke.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
            ,         ,          ,           ,          ,
      For thou|sand Yorks | he shall | not hide | his head,
            ,       ,           ,          ,         ,
      But bold|ly stand | and front | him to | his face.
 
YORK
           ,        ,     ,        ,     ,
      How now?| Is So|merset | at li|berty?
             ,        ,           ,      ,            ,
      Then York | unloose | thy long-|impri|soned thoughts,
           ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      And let | thy tongue | be e|qual with | thy heart.
        ,           ,          ,         ,     ,
      Shall I | endure | the sight | of So|merset?
        T     T    T        2      ,        ,           ,
      False king, why | hast thou bro|ken faith | with me,
        ,             ,     ,         ,        ,
      Knowing | how hard|ly I | can brook | abuse?
        ,            ,           ,               ,    ,
      King did | I call | thee? No,| thou art / not king,
           ,        ,     2      ,     ,      ,
      Not fit | to go|vern and rule | multi|tudes,
      <-           ,          ,         ,           ,        ,
        Which || darst not,| no nor | canst not | rule a | traitor.
             ,         ,           ,        ,        ,
      That head | of thine | doth not | become | a crown;
            ,         ,         ,        ,          ,
      Thy hand | is made | to grasp | a pal|mer's staff,
           ,         ,         ,       ,         ,      ->
      And not | to grace | an aw|ful prince|ly scep||tre.
        ,      ,            ,        ,            ,           ,  ->
      That | gold, must | round en|girt these | brows of || mine,
                ,           ,      ,           ,           ,  ->
      Whose | smile and | frown, like / to A|chilles' || spear,
           ,          2       ,          ,          ,
      Is | able | with the change,| to kill | and cure.
        ,           ,         ,        ,       ,
      Here is | a hand | to hold | a scep|tre up
            ,          ,        ,         ,         ,
      And with | the same | to act | control|ling laws:
             ,         ,        ,            ,         ,
      Give place:| by hea|ven thou | shalt rule | no more
           ,            x        ,      ,         ,     2->
      Ore him | whom heaven | crea|ted for | thy ru||ler.
 
SOMERSET
         ,           ,       ,       ,           ,
      O mon|strous trai|tor! I | arrest | thee York
          ,   2     ,     2    ,           ,          ,
      Of ca|pital trea|son against | the king | and crown:
        ,       ,         ,         ,           ,
      Obey | auda|cious trai|tor, kneel | for grace.
 
YORK
                ,         ,       ,             ,         ,
      Wouldst^have | me kneel?| First let | me ask | of these,
           ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      If they | can brook | I bow | a knee | to man.
       ,         ,            ,        ,        ,
      Sirrah,| call in | my sons | to be | my bail:
          ,     ,                ,        ,        ,
      I know | ere they | will have | me go | to ward,
                ,             ,          ,       ,    ,
      They'll pawn | their swords | for my | enfran|chisement.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
            ,        ,         ,          ,       ,
      Call hi|ther Clif|ford, bid | him come | amain,
          ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      To say | if that | the bas|tard boys | of York
             ,         ,   ,    2          ,        ,
      Shall be | the sure|ty for their | traitor | father.
 
[Exit BUCKINGHAM]
 
YORK
          ,        ,       ,   ,    ,
      O blood-|bespot|ted Ne|apo|litan,
       T   T   .  T        ,           ,        ,
      Outcast of Na|ples, Eng|land's bloo|dy scourge,
            ,         ,         ,        ,           ,
      The sons | of York,| thy bet|ters in | their birth,
             ,          ,          ,          ,         ,
      Shall be | their fa|ther's bail,| and bane | to those
            ,         ,       ,        ,          ,
      That for | my sure|ty will | refuse | the boys.
       ,                 ,          ,      2          ,         ,
      See where | they come,| I'll war|rant they'll make | it good.
 
[Enter EDWARD and RICHARD, CLIFFORD and YOUNG CLIFFORD]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
            ,            ,        ,      ,           ,
      And here | comes Clif|ford to | deny | their bail.
 
CLIFFORD
         ,           ,   ,             2     ,          ,
      Health, and | all hap/piness | to my lord | the king.
 
[Kneels to HENRY]
 
YORK
          ,            ,         ,           ,           ,
      I thank | thee Clif|ford: say,| what news | with thee?
       ,               ,          ,        ,       ,
      Nay, do | not fright | us with | an an|gry look:
       ,            ,   2       ,          ,        ,
      We are | thy so|vereign Clif|ford, kneel | again;
           ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      For thy | mista|king so,| we par|don thee.
 
CLIFFORD
        ,    2       T    T   T       ,         ,
      This is my | king York, I | do not | mistake;
            ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      But thou | mistakes | me much | to think | I do,
          ,        ,     ,     2       T    T    T
      To Bed|lam with | him, is the | man grown mad?
 
KING HENRY VI
       ,    ,             ,          2   ,        ,     ->
      Aye Clif/ford; a | bedlam | and ambi|tious hu||mor
        ,        2    ,         ,        ,           ,
      Makes | him oppose | himself | against | his king.
 
CLIFFORD
       ,          ,        ,         ,         x
      He is | a trai|tor; let | him to | the Tower,
            ,      ,          ,          ,        ,
      And chop | away | that fac|tious pate | of his.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
       ,         ,        ,          ,      ,
      He is | arres|ted, but | will not | obey:
            ,         ,            ,            ,          ,
      His sons |(he says)| shall give | their words | for him.
 
YORK
                  ,    ,
      Will you / not sons?  \\
 
EDWARD
       T    Tx   T        ,         ,            ,
      Aye noble fa|ther, if | our words | will serve.
 
RICHARD
       ,         ,           ,               ,         ,
      And if | words will | not, then | our wea|pons shall.
 
CLIFFORD
       ,             ,          ,         ,         ,
      Why what | a brood | of trai|tors have | we here?
 
YORK
        ,           ,           ,        ,       ,
      Look in | a glass,| and call | thy i|mage so:
      ,   2        ,           T  .   T     T       ,
      I am thy | king, and | thou a false-heart | traitor.
            ,   ,    2        ,         T    T     T
      Call hi|ther to the | stake my | two brave bears,
        ,              ,     ,        ,            ,
      That with | the ve|ry sha|king of | their chains,
            ,       ,                ,   ,         ,
      They may | asto|nish these*/ fell-lur|king curs,
           ,      x         ,         ,        ,
      Bid Sal|isbury | and War|wick come | to me.
 
[Enter the WARWICK and SALISBURY]
 
CLIFFORD
            ,           ,             ,          ,          ,
      Are these | thy bears?| We'll bait | thy bears | to death,
           ,     ,         ,     ,                ,
      And man|acle | the bear-|ward in | their chains,
           ,      ,     ,                     ,        ,
      If thou | darst bring / them to | the bait|ing place.
 
RICHARD
       ,             ,       ,        ,        ,
      Oft have | I seen | a hot | orewee|ning cur
       T    T   .    T        ,         ,          ,
      Run back and bite,| because | he was | withheld,
           ,      ,    ,       2        T      T   T
      Who be|ing suf|fered with the | bear's fell paw,
              ,            ,        ,           ,          ,
      Hath clapped | his tail | between | his legs | and cried,
            ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
      And such | a piece | of ser|vice will | you do,
       ,    2     ,          ,          ,          ,
      If you op|pose your|selves to | match Lord^|Warwick.
 
CLIFFORD
        T     T   .   T       ,        ,        ,
      Hence heap of wrath,| foul in|diges|ted lump,
           ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      As croo|ked in | thy man|ners as | thy shape.
 
YORK
       ,               ,         ,        ,     ,
      Nay we | shall heat | you tho|roughly | anon.
 
CLIFFORD
             ,          ,          ,          ,           ,
      Take heed,| lest by | your heat | you burn | yourselves.
 
KING HENRY VI
           ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      Why War|wick, hath | thy knee | forgot | to bow?
           ,      x      ,             ,        ,
      Old Sal|isbury,| shame to | thy sil|ver hair,
            ,        ,                  ,     ,   ,
      Thou mad | mislea|der of thy // brain-sick son,
        ,           ,    2        ,           ,         ,
      What wilt | thou on thy | death-bed*| play the | ruffian?
            ,         ,        ,          ,      ,
      And seek | for sor|row with | thy spec|tacles?
           ,          ,          ,         ,     ,
      Oh where | is faith?| Oh where | is loy|alty?
       ,          ,          ,          ,       ,
      If it | be ba|nished from | the fros|ty head,
        ,                ,       ,       ,         ,
      Where shall | it find | a har|bor in | the earth?
             ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      Wilt thou | go dig | a grave | to find | out^war,
            ,            ,    ,      ,           ,
      And shame | thine^ho|nora|ble age | with blood?
           ,          ,           ,        ,     ,
      Why art | thou old,| and wantst | expe|rience?
           ,          ,         x      ,          ,
      Or where|fore dost | abuse it,| if thou | hast it?
            ,         ,      ,          ,        ,
      For shame | in du|ty bend | thy knee | to me
             ,       ,         ,            ,      ,
      That bows | unto | the grave | with mick|le age.
 
SALISBURY
           ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      My lord,| I have | consi|dered with | myself
           ,      ,          ,       ,        ,
      The ti|tle of | this most | renow|ned duke,
           ,       ,           ,       ,          ,
      And in | my con|science do | repute | his grace
            ,         ,        ,          ,       ,
      The right|ful heir | to Eng|land's roy|al seat.
 
KING HENRY VI
             ,          ,        ,         ,     ,
      Hast thou | not sworn | alle|giance un|to me?
 
SALISBURY
          ,
      I have.  ????
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,               ,             x           ,         ,
      Canst thou | dispense | with heaven | for such | an oath?
 
SALISBURY
                ,    ,         ,        ,      ,
      It is / great sin | to swear | unto | a sin,
            ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      But grea|ter sin | to keep | a sin|ful oath.
       ,             ,        ,     ,       ,
      Who can | be bound | by a|ny so|lemn vow
          ,      ,    2      ,        ,       ,
      To do | a mur|derous deed,| to rob | a man,
           ,         ,        ,          ,     ,
      To force | a spot|less vir|gin's chas|tity,
           ,          ,   ,    2       ,     ,
      To reave | the or|phan of his | patri|mony,
           ,          ,       ,         ,          ,
      To wring | the wi|dow from | her cus|tomed right,
            ,       ,       ,       ,           ,
      And have | no o|ther rea|son for | this wrong
            ,               ,    ,      ,        ,
      But that | he was / bound by | a so|lemn oath?
 
QUEEN MARGARET
         ,        ,        ,         ,      ,
      A sub|tle trai|tor needs | no so|phister.
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,    ,                ,         ,         ,
      Call Buck/ingham,| and bid | him arm | himself.
 
YORK
        ,    ,                ,           ,             ,
      Call Buck/ingham,| and all | the friends | thou hast,
      ,           ,           ,         ,     ,
      I am | resolved | for death | or dig|nity.
 
CLIFFORD
            ,        ,         ,     .    T     T     T
      The first | I war|rant thee,| if^dreams prove true.
 
WARWICK
         2       ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      You were best | to go | to bed | and dream | again,
           ,      ,              ,        ,         ,
      To keep | thee from | the tem|pest of | the field.
 
CLIFFORD
      ,           ,          ,        ,        ,
      I am | resolved | to bear | a grea|ter storm
           ,      ,           ,        ,      ,
      Than a|ny thou | canst^con|jure up | today:
            ,           ,       ,         ,     ,
      And that | I'll write | upon | thy bur|gonet,
        ,    2        ,    ,               T    T    T
      Might I but | know thee / by thy | household badge.
 
WARWICK
       ,           ,          ,          ,         ,
      Now by | my fa|ther's badge,| old Ne|vil's crest,
           ,         ,       ,              ,        ,
      The ram|pant bear | chained to | the rag|ged staff,
            ,           ,       ,        ,     ,
      This^day | I'll wear | aloft | my bur|gonet,
          ,       ,        ,         ,       ,
      As on | a moun|tain top | the ce|dar shows,
             ,            ,          ,        ,      ,
      That keeps | his leaves | in spite | of a|ny storm,
      ,   2          ,       ,               ,          ,
      Even to | affright | thee with | the view | thereof.
 
CLIFFORD
            ,         ,     ,           ,          ,
      And from | thy bur|gonet | I'll rend | thy bear
            ,         ,       ,          ,         ,
      And tread | it un|der foot | with all | contempt,
          ,           ,     ,              ,           ,
      Despite | the bear-|ward that | protects | the bear.
 
YOUNG CLIFFORD
           ,        ,        ,    ,     ,
      And so | to arms | victo|rious | father,
           ,          ,       ,         2   ,      ,
      To quell | the re|bels and | their accom|plices.
 
RICHARD
       T    T  . T          ,      ,              ,
      Fie, charity | for shame,| speak not | in spite,
           ,           ,          ,       ,         ,
      For you | shall sup | with Je|su Christ | tonight.
 
YOUNG CLIFFORD
        ,        ,               ,           ,            ,
      Foul stig|matic | that's more | than thou | canst^tell.
 
RICHARD
          ,          x              ,      ,         ,
      If not | in heaven,| you'll sure|ly sup | in hell.
 
[Exeunt severally]

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