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Henry VI part two

Act IV, Scene 10

Kent. IDEN's garden.
 
[Enter CADE]
 
CADE
Fie on ambition! Fie on myself, that have a sword, and yet am ready to famish! These five days have I hid me in these woods and durst not peep out, for all the country is laid for me; but now am I so hungry that if I might have a lease of my life for a thousand years I could stay no longer. Wherefore, on a brick wall have I climbed into this garden, to see if I can eat grass, or pick a sallet another while, which is not amiss to cool a man's stomach this hot weather. And I think this word 'sallet' was born to do me good: for many a time, but for a sallet, my brainpan had been cleft with a brown bill; and many a time, when I have been dry and bravely marching, it hath served me instead of a quart pot to drink in; and now the word sallet must serve me to feed on.
 
[Enter IDEN]
 
IDEN
       __     ,            T   T    T       2      ,
      Lord,| who would | live turmoiled | in the court,
           ,       ,          ,       ,          ,
      And may | enjoy | such qui|et walks | as these?
             ,        ,     ,         ,        ,       2->
      This small | inhe|ritance | my fa|ther left || me
          ,        ,         ,        ,     ,
      Conten|teth me,| and worth | a mo|narchy.
          ,       2    ,      ,        ,         ,
      I seek | not to wax | great by | others'| waning,
          ,         ,         ,     ,      2        ,
      Or ga|ther wealth | I care | not with what | envy:
          ,        ,        ,          ,          ,
      Suffic|eth that | I have | maintains | my state,
            ,           ,            ,        ,         ,
      And sends | the poor | well* plea|sed from | my gate.
 
CADE
Here's the lord of the soil come to seize me for a stray, for entering his fee-simple without leave. Ah, villain, thou wilt betray me, and get a thousand crowns of the king carrying my head to him: but I'll make thee eat iron like an ostrich, and swallow my sword like a great pin, ere thou and I part.
 
IDEN
            ,        ,         ,     ,          ,
      Why rude | compan|ion, what|soere | thou be,
          ,          ,     ,      2         ,      ,
      I know | thee not,| why then should | I be|tray thee?
        2    ,       ,          ,      ,  2      ,
      Is it not | enough | to break | into my | garden,
            ,        ,          ,        ,          ,
      And like | a thief | to come | to rob | my grounds:
        ,     2       ,          ,         ,        ,
      Climbing my | walls in | spite of | me the | owner,
            ,           ,          ,           ,       ,
      But thou | wilt brave | me with | these sau|cy terms?
 
CADE
Brave thee? Aye, by the best blood that ever was broached, and beard thee too. Look on me well: I have eat no meat these five days; yet, come thou and thy five men, and if I do not leave you all as dead as a doornail, I pray God I may never eat grass more.
 
IDEN
       ,                ,         ,           ,          ,
      Nay, it | shall nere | be said,| while Eng|land stands,
           ,     ,       x      2    ,          ,
      That A|lexan|der Iden,| an esquire | of Kent,
             ,        ,            ,    ,         ,
      Took^odds | to com|bat* a / poor fam|ished man.
          ,          ,         ,        ,         ,
      Oppose | thy stead|fast^ga|zing^eyes | to mine,
       ,              ,          ,         ,          ,
      See if | thou canst | outface | me with | thy looks:
            ,         ,          ,         ,           x
      Set limb | to limb,| and thou | art far | the lesser;
            ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      Thy hand | is but | a fin|ger to | my fist,
           ,        ,          ,            ,      ,
      Thy leg | a stick | compared | with this | truncheon,
           ,            ,           ,            ,             ,
      My foot | shall fight | with all | the strength | thou hast,
           ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      And if | mine arm | be hea|ved in | the air,
            ,           ,        ,      ,         ,
      Thy grave | is digged | alrea|dy in | the earth.
       ,         T      T    T         ,         ,
      As for | words, whosegreat|ness an|swers words,
            ,         ,         ,            ,          ,
      Let^this | my sword | report | what speech | forbears.
 
CADE
By my valor, the most complete champion that ever I heard. Steel, if thou turn the edge, or cut not out the burly-boned clown in chines of beef ere thou sleep in thy sheath, I beseech God on my knees thou mayst be turned to hobnails.
 
[Here they fight. CADE falls]
O I am slain, famine and no other hath slain me: let ten thousand devils come against me, and give me but the ten meals I have lost, and I'll defy them all. Wither, garden; and be henceforth a burying-place to all that do dwell in this house, because the unconquered soul of Cade is fled.
 
IDEN
        2     ,         ,          ,           ,           ,       ->
      Is it Cade | that I | have slain,| that mon|strous trai||tor?
        ,      2      ,        ,          ,          ,
      Sword,| I will hol|low thee | for this | thy deed,
            ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      And hang | thee ore | my tomb | when I | am dead.
        ,                 ,         ,       ,          ,
      Nere shall | this blood | be wi|ped from | thy point,
            ,            ,        ,      ,          ,
      But thou | shalt wear | it as | a he|rald's coat,
        2    ,          ,       ,         ,       ,
      To emblaze | the ho|nor that | thy mas|ter got.
 
CADE
Iden, farewell, and be proud of thy victory. Tell Kent from me, she hath lost her best man, and exhort all the world to be cowards; for I, that never feared any, am vanquished by famine, not by valor.
 
[Dies]
 
IDEN
            ,            ,           ,       ,        ,
      How much | thou wrongst | me, hea|ven be | my judge.
       T     T      T           ,         ,           ,          ->
      Die damned wretch,| the curse | of her | that bare || thee;
       ,      2     ,          ,     ,       2     ,
      And | as I thrust | thy bo|dy in | with my sword,
           ,       ,            ,           ,         ,
      So wish | I, I | might thrust | thy soul | to hell.
        ,              ,           ,    ,             ,
      Hence will | I drag | thee head|long by | the heels
       ,  2      T   T    T            ,         ,
      Unto a | dunghill which | shall be | thy grave,
            ,          ,          ,       ,          ,
      And there | cut^off | thy most | ungra|cious head,
            ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      Which I | will bear | in tri|umph to | the king,
       ,              ,           ,          ,      ,
      Leaving | thy trunk | for crows | to feed | upon.
 
[Exit]

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