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Twelfth Night

Act I, Scene 4

DUKE ORSINO's palace.
 
[Enter VALENTINE and VIOLA in man's attire]
 
VALENTINE
If the duke continue these favours towards you, Cesario, you are like to be much advanced: he hath known you but three days, and already you are no stranger.
 
VIOLA
You either fear his humour or my negligence, that you call in question the continuance of his love: is he inconstant, sir, in his favours?
 
VALENTINE
No, believe me.
 
VIOLA
I thank you: Here comes the count.
 
[Enter DUKE ORSINO, CURIO, and Attendants]
 
DUKE ORSINO
Who saw Cesario, ho?
 
VIOLA
       ,            ,              ,    ,    oo
      On your | atten|dance my / lord here.|
 
DUKE ORSINO
        ,             ,        ,       ,   ,
      Stand you | a while | aloof.| Cesa|rio,
              ,          ,         ,        ,         ,
      Thou knowst | no less,| but all:| I have | unclasped
           ,          ,    ,   2         ,        ,
      To thee | the book | even of | my se|cret soul:
            ,            ,         ,           ,      2   ,
      Therefore | good youth,| address | thy gait | unto her;
          ,        ,     ,         ,              ,
      Be not | denied | access,| stand at | her doors,
            ,            ,          ,       ,            ,
      And tell | them, there | thy fix|ed foot | shall grow
             ,          ,    2
      Till thou | have au|dience.
 
VIOLA
                                   ,        ,       ,
                                 Sure | my no|ble lord,
          ,        ,      ,   ,     2       ,
10    If she | be so | aban|doned to her | sorrow
       ,   2       ,           ,        ,      ,
      As it is | spoke, she | never | will ad|mit me.
 
DUKE ORSINO
          ,      ,          ,         ,        ,
      Be cla|morous | and leap | all ci|vil bounds
       ,              ,        ,     ,       ,
      Rather | than make | unprof|ited | return.
 
VIOLA
       ,       ,   ,                     ,           ,
      Say I | do speak / with her |(my lord)| what then?
 
DUKE ORSINO
          ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      O then,| unfold | the pas|sion of | my love,
           ,                 ,    ,               ,    ,
      Surprise | her with / discourse | of my / dear faith:
           ,         ,           ,        ,         ,
      It shall | become | thee well | to act | my woes;
       ,             ,        ,       ,         ,
      She will | attend | it bet|ter in | thy youth
        ,    2     ,               ,    ,      ,
      Than in a | nunci|o's^of / more grave | aspect.
 
VIOLA
          ,          ,        ,
20    I think | not so,| my lord.
 
DUKE ORSINO
                                       ,           x
                                 Dear lad,| believe it,
            ,           ,       ,         ,       ,
      For they | shall yet | belie | thy hap|py years,
            ,          ,       ,      ,       ,
      That say | thou art | a man:| Dia|na's lip
          ,            ,          ,   2            ,     ,
      Is not | more smooth | and ru|bious; thy / small pipe
          ,        ,         ,         ,           ,
      Is as | the mai|den's or|gan, shrill | and sound,
           ,        ,       ,       ,         ,
      And all | is sem|blative | a wo|man's part.
          ,         ,       ,             ,    ,
      I know | thy con|stella|tion is / right apt
            ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      For this | affair.| Some four | or five | attend || him;
       ,      2      ,        ,       ,         ,
      All | if you will;| for I | myself | am best
             ,         ,    2     ,        ,         ,
30    When least | in com|pany. Pros|per well | in this,
            ,            ,         ,      ,         ,
      And thou | shalt live | as free|ly as | thy lord,
           ,         ,          ,
      To call | his for|tunes thine.
 
VIOLA
                                           ,        ,
                                     I'll do | my best
          ,          ,              ,       ,         ,
      To woo | your la|dy: [Aside] Yet | a bar|ful strife,
          ,       ,        ,           ,         ,
      Whoere | I woo,| myself | would be | his wife.
 
[Exeunt]

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