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The Taming of the Shrew

Induction, Scene 1

Before an alehouse on a heath.
 
[Enter Hostess and SLY]
 
SLY
I'll pheeze you, in faith.
 
HOSTESS
A pair of stocks, you rogue!
 
SLY
Ye are a baggage: the Slys are no rogues; look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror. Therefore paucas pallabris; let the world slide: sessa!
 
HOSTESS
You will not pay for the glasses you have burst?
 
SLY
No, not a denier. Go by, Jeronimy: go to thy cold bed, and warm thee.
 
HOSTESS
I know my remedy; I must go fetch the third--borough.
 
[Exit]
 
SLY
Third, or fourth, or fifth borough, I'll answer him by law: I'll not budge an inch, boy: let him come, and kindly.
 
[Falls asleep.  Horns winded. Enter a Lord from hunting, with his train]
 
LORD
        ,            ,             ,        ,          ,
      Huntsman | I charge | thee, ten|der well | my hounds:
        ,    ,                ,     ,            ,
      Brach Mer/riman,| the poor | cur is | embossed;
           ,        ,                   ,    ,        ,
      And cou|ple Clow|der with the / deep-mouth|ed brach.
        ,           ,             ,        ,         ,
      Sawst thou | not boy | how Sil|ver made | it good
                 ,    ,        ,        ,         ,
5     At the / hedge-cor|ner, in | the col|dest fault?
          ,           ,         ,          ,       ,
      I would | not lose | the dog | for twen|ty pound.
 
FIRST HUNTSMAN
           ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      Why Bel|man is | as good | as he | my lord;
           ,        ,       ,         ,       ,
      He cried | upon | it at | the mere|st loss
            ,        ,            ,         ,         ,
      And twice | today | picked^out | the dul|lest scent:
        ,            ,         ,         ,       ,
10    Trust me,| I take | him for | the bet|ter dog.
 
LORD
            ,        ,       ,       ,         ,
      Thou art | a fool,| if E|cho were | as fleet,
          ,         ,          ,        ,       ,
      I would | esteem | him worth | a do|zen such.
           ,           ,          ,       ,         ,
      But sup | them well | and look | unto | them all:
         ,      ,       ,         ,       ,
      Tomor|row I | intend | to hunt | again.
 
FIRST HUNTSMAN
          ,         ,
15    I will,| my lord.  \\
 
LORD
               ,          ,         ,           ,          ,
      What's here?| One dead,| or drunk?| See doth | he breathe?
 
SECOND HUNTSMAN
             ,           ,          ,          ,           ,
      He breathes | my lord.| Were he | not warmed | with ale,
        ,      2     ,          ,         ,          ,
      This were a | bed but | cold to | sleep so | soundly.
 
LORD
         ,           ,           ,        ,          ,
      O mon|strous beast,| how like | a swine | he lies.
             ,           ,          ,       2     ,      ,
20    Grim^death,| how foul | and loath|some is thine | image:
        ,              ,        ,          ,       ,
      Sirs, I | will prac|tise on | this drun|ken man.
             ,      ,         ,             ,         ,
      What think | you, if | he were | conveyed | to bed,
         ,           T      T       T      ,   3  3       ,
      Wrapped in | sweet clothes, rings | put upon his | fingers,
          ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      A most | deli|cious ban|quet by | his bed,
            ,        ,          ,          ,         ,
25    And brave | atten|dants near | him when | he wakes,
             ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Would not | the beg|gar then | forget | himself?
 
FIRST HUNTSMAN
          ,          ,        ,         ,         ,
      Believe | me lord,| I think | he can|not choose.
 
SECOND HUNTSMAN
           ,             ,         ,         ,         ,
      It would | seem strange | unto | him when | he waked.
 
LORD
        ,    2      ,   2        ,          ,          ,
      Eene as a | flattering | dream or | worthless | fancy.
             ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
30    Then take | him up,| and man|age well | the jest:
       ,   2       ,        ,        ,         , 
      Carry him | gently | to my | fairest | chamber
              x       ,           ,        ,        ,
      And hang it | round with | all my | wanton*| pictures:
        T   .    T    T         ,         ,       ,
      Balm his foul head | in warm | distilled | waters
       .    T    T     T         ,         ,         ,
      And burn sweet wood | to make | the lod|ging sweet:
           ,        ,      ,       ,         ,
35    Procure | me mu|sic rea|dy when | he wakes,
           ,       ,       ,       ,    2     ,
      To make | a dul|cet and | a hea|venly sound;
           ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      And if | he chance | to speak,| be rea|dy straight
            ,       ,        ,        ,     ,
      And with | a low | submis|sive re|verence
       ,           ,            ,        ,         ,
      Say, what | is it | your hon|our will | command?
       ,     2     ,          ,       ,        ,
40    Let one at|tend him | with a | silver | basin
        T   .   T   T      ,         ,              x
      Full of rose-wa|ter and | bestrewed | with flowers,
        ,        ,          x          ,        ,      2->
      Ano|ther bear | the ewer:| the third | a dia||per,
           ,        2      ,            ,         ,           ,
      And say | Will it please | your lord|ship cool | your hands?
        ,           ,       ,       ,        ,
      Someone | be rea|dy with | a cos|tly suit
           ,          ,       ,      ,          ,
45    And ask | him what | appar|el he | will wear;
        ,        ,         ,         ,            ,
      Ano|ther tell | him of | his hounds | and horse,
            ,         ,       ,         ,        ,
      And that | his la|dy mourns | at his | disease:
           ,           ,         ,          ,    ,
      Persuade | him that | he hath | been lu|natic;
            ,         ,        ,    ,               ,
      And when | he says | he is,| say that | he dreams,
           ,       ,        ,        ,       ,
50    For he | is no|thing but | a migh|ty lord.
            ,        ,        ,       ,        ,
      This do | and do | it kind|ly, gen|tle sirs,
           ,        ,        ,        ,      ,
      It will | be pas|time pas|sing ex|cellent,
          ,       ,      ,          ,     ,
      If it | be hus|banded | with mod|esty.
 
FIRST HUNTSMAN
           ,       ,        ,      2       ,          ,
      My lord | I war|rant you | we will play | our part,
          ,           ,                ,   ,      ,
55    As he | shall think | by our / true dil|igence
          ,        ,           ,        ,        ,
      He is | no less | than what | we say | he is.
 
LORD
        ,            ,       ,        ,          ,
      Take him | up gen|tly and | to bed | with him;
            ,     ,            ,        ,         ,
      And each | one to | his of|fice when | he wakes.
 
[Some bear out SLY. A trumpet sounds]
          ,        ,           ,        ,            ,
      Sirrah,| go see | what trum|pet 'tis | that sounds:
 
[Exit Servingman]
          ,          ,      ,      ,           ,
60    Belike | some no|ble gen|tleman | that means,
        ,   2              ,        ,       ,          ,
      (Travelling | some jour|ney) to | repose | him here.
 
[Re-enter Servingman]
           ,           x
      How now? | Who is it?
 
SERVANT
                                 2      ,           ,        ,      2->
                              And it please | your hon|or, play||ers
            ,      ,        ,          ,
      That of|fer ser|vice to | your lord|ship.
 
LORD
      <- ,            ,   __
65      Bid || them come near.  \\
 
[Enter Players]
           ,         ,         ,        2
      Now fel|lows, you | are wel||come.
 
PLAYERS
                                              ,           ,     2->
                                         We thank | your hon||or.
 
LORD
          ,        ,         ,          ,       ,
      Do you | intend | to stay | with me | tonight?
 
PLAYER
            ,            ,    ,    2     ,         ,
      So please | your lord|ship to ac|cept our | duty.
 
LORD
            ,         ,           ,   ,   2    ,
70    With all | my heart.| This fel|low I re|member,
              ,          ,        ,         ,       ,
      Since^once | he played | a far|mer's el|dest son:
              ,           ,          ,      ,    2     ,
      'Twas where | you wooed | the gen|tlewo|man so well:
      ,            ,           ,          ,           ,
      I have | forgot | your name;| but sure | that part
           ,      ,     2     ,       ,        ,
      Was ap|tly fit|ted and nat|urally | performed.
 
PLAYER
          ,           ,      ,          ,       ,
75    I think |'twas So|to that | your hon|or means.
 
LORD
            ,      ,           ,         ,      ,
      'Tis ve|ry true:| thou didst | it ex|cellent.
            ,          ,        ,     2   ,       ,
      Well you | are come | to me | in a hap|py time;
           ,       ,        ,           ,          ,
      The ra|ther for | I have | some sport | in hand
            ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Wherein | your cun|ning can | assist | me much.
             ,       ,           ,          ,        ,
80    There is | a lord | will hear | you play | tonight:
          ,        ,        ,         ,     ,
      But I | am doubt|ful of | your mod|esties;
            ,      ,       ,        ,       ,      2->
      Lest^(o|ver-eye|ing of | his odd | beha||vior
           ,         ,       ,       ,         ,
      For yet | his hon|our ne|ver heard | a play)
            ,        ,         ,      ,       o
      You break | into | some mer|ry pas|sion
           ,       ,          ,        ,          ,
85    And so | offend | him; for | I tell | you sirs,
          ,             ,          ,        ,
      If you | should smile | he grows | impa|tient.
 
PLAYER
             ,         ,     ,            ,          ,
      Fear* not | my lord:| we can | contain | ourselves,
            ,        ,    2   ,      ,         ,
      Were he | the ver|iest an|tic in | the world.
 
LORD
       ,            ,          ,        ,     ,
      Go sir|rah, take | them to | the but|tery,
            ,            ,       ,        ,      ,
90    And give | them friend|ly wel|come ev|ery one:
                   ,   ,         ,         ,         ,
      Let them / want no|thing that | my house | affords.
 
[Exit one with the Players]
          ,     ,         2     ,    ,         ,
      Sirrah | go you | to Bartho|lomew | my page,
           ,           ,        2      ,       ,       ,
      And see | him dressed | in all suits | like a | lady:
              ,         ,     ,    2        ,            ,
      That* done,| conduct | him to the | drunkard's | chamber,
            ,         ,       ,      2  ,    ,
95    And call | him ma|dam, do | him obe|isance.
        ,              ,       ,         ,         ,
      Tell him | from me |(as he | will win | my love)
           ,         ,          ,     ,      ,       ->
      He bear | himself | with hon|oura|ble ac||tion,
        ,      2     ,         ,         ,      ,      ->
      Such | as he hath | observed | in no|ble la||dies
       ,   2        ,          ,       ,         
      Un|to their lords,| by them | accom|plished,
            ,     ,         ,        ,         ,
100   Such^du|ty to | the drun|kard let | him do
             ,     T     T    .   T       ,     ,
      With soft | low tongue and low|ly cour|tesy,
           ,           x           ,        ,         ,
      And say:| what is it | your hon|our will | command,
            ,         ,     ,          ,        ,
      Wherein | your la|dy and | your hum|ble wife
            ,         ,            ,    ,           ,
      May show | her du|ty and / make known | her love?
            ,           ,        ,            ,        ,      2->
105   And then | with kind | embrace|ments, temp|ting kis||ses,
       ,        2    ,        ,     ,  2       ,
      And | with decli|ning head | into his | bosom,
       ,          ,    ,               ,      ,
      Bid him | shed tears,/ as be|ing o|verjoyed
          ,         ,       ,         ,           ,
      To see | her no|ble lord | restored | to health,
       ,     2        ,        ,       2      ,
      Who for this | seven | years hath es|teemed him
            x       ,        ,          ,          ,
110   No better | than a | poor and | loathsome | beggar:
           ,        ,          ,       ,         ,
      And if | the boy | have not | a wo|man's gift
           ,       ,       ,       ,        ,
      To rain | a sho|wer of | comman|ded tears,
          ,             ,   ,          ,        ,
      An on|ion will / do well | for such | a shift,
             ,      ,        ,       ,          ,
      Which^in | a nap|kin (be|ing close | conveyed)
             ,       ,         ,        ,  2    ,
115   Shall in | despite | enforce | a wa|tery eye.
            ,          ,            ,          ,            ,
      See this | dispatched | with all | the haste | thou canst:
         ,          ,           ,         ,         o
      Anon | I'll give | thee more | instruc|tions.
 
[Exit a Servingman]
          ,         ,           ,       ,          ,
      I know | the boy | will well | usurp | the grace,
        T      T    .   T   ,    2     ,      ,
      Voice, gait, and^ac|tion of a | gentle|woman:
          ,         ,          ,          ,        ,       ->
120   I long | to hear | him call | the drunk|ard hus||band,
       ,       2    ,           ,          ,             ,       2->
      And | how my men | will stay | themselves | from laugh||ter
             ,        ,     3  3      ,       ,       o
      When they | do hom|age to this sim|ple pea|sant.
        ,    2       ,         ,    ,           ,
      I'll in to | counsel | them; hap/ly my | presence
            ,       ,        ,      ,        ,
      May well | abate | the o|ver-mer|ry spleen
            ,       ,            ,     ,          ,
125   Which o|therwise | would grow | into | extremes.
 
[Exeunt]

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