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Romeo and Juliet

Act V, Scene 3

A churchyard; in it a tomb belonging to the Capulets.
 
[Enter PARIS and his PAGE, bearing flowers and a torch]
 
PARIS
        ,    2        T    T     T           ,       ,
      Give me thy | torch boy: hence,| and stand | aloof:
           ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      Yet put | it out,| for I | would not | be seen.
       ,            ,     ,    ,                  ,
      Under | yond^yew-|trees lay / thee all | along,
       ,               ,      ,             ,         ,
      Holding | thine^ear | close to | the hol|low ground;
           ,          ,      ,          ,           ,
5     So shall | no foot | upon | the church|yard tread,
        2     ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      Being loose,| unfirm | with dig|ging up | of graves,
            ,            ,          ,        ,        ,
      But thou | shalt hear | it: whis|tle then | to me,
          ,        ,            ,       ,             ,
      As sig|nal that | thou hearst | something | approach.
        ,               ,        ,     2   ,           ,
      Give me | those flow|ers. Do | as I bid | thee, go.
 
PAGE [Aside]
      ,       ,           ,         ,        ,
10    I am | almost | afraid | to stand | alone
        ,              ,     ,      2      ,      ,
      Here in | the church|yard; yet I | will ad|venture.
 
[Retires]
 
PARIS
                ,             ,           ,       ,        ,
      Sweet* flower,| with flowers | thy bri|dal bed | I strew:
         ,         ,    ,        ,           ,
      O woe,| thy ca|nopy | is dust | and stones,
              ,            ,       ,      ,         ,
      Which^with | sweet* wa|ter night|ly I | will dew,
          ,         ,           ,          ,           ,
15    Or wan|ting that,| with tears | distilled | by moans:
           ,     ,          ,         ,           ,
      The ob|sequies | that I | for thee | will keep
        ,              ,        ,           ,           ,
      Nightly | shall be | to strew | thy grave | and weep.
 
[The Page whistles]
           ,           ,         ,          ,         ,
      The boy | gives war|ning some|thing doth | approach.
            ,        ,     ,              ,        ,
      What cur|sed foot | wanders | this way | tonight,
           ,         ,     ,           ,             ,
20    To cross | my ob|sequies | and true | love's^rite?
        ,             ,      ,            ,        ,
      What with | a torch?| Muffle | me night | awhile.
 
[Retires]
 
[Enter ROMEO and BALTHASAR, with a torch, mattock, etc.]
 
ROMEO
        ,             ,        ,          ,          ,
      Give me | that mat|tock and | the wren|ching iron.
       __      ,            x     ,       2       ,
      Hold | take this | letter; ear/ly in the | morning
       ,      2    ,       ,   2       ,         ,
      See thou de|liver | it to my | lord and | father.
        ,    2        ,       ,          ,         ,
25    Give me the | light: u|pon thy | life I | charge thee,
           ,            ,          ,       T    T  .  T
      Whatere | thou hearst | or seest,| stand all aloof,
           ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      And do | not in|terrupt | me in | my course.
          ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
      Why I | descend | into | this bed | of death,
           ,      ,       ,        ,        ,
      Is part|ly to | behold | my la|dy's face;
            ,     2     ,       ,                ,     ,
30    But chief|ly to take | thence from | her dead | finger
         ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      A pre|cious ring,| a ring | that I | must use
           ,        ,          ,          ,          ,
      In dear | employ|ment: there|fore hence | be gone:
           ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      But if | thou jea|lous dost | return | to pry
           ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
      In what | I fur|ther shall | intend | to do,
                 ,          ,           ,          ,
35    By hea|ven I | will tear | thee joint | by joint
            ,           ,         ,     ,               ,
      And strew | this hun|gry church|yard with | thy limbs:
            ,         ,       ,          ,        ,
      The time | and my | intents | are sa|vage wild,
               ,           ,       ,   ,      ,
      More* fierce | and more | inex|ora|ble far
            ,      ,       ,        ,        ,
      Than em|pty ti|gers or | the roa|ring sea.
 
BALTHASAR
          ,         ,          ,          ,       ,
40    I will | be gone | sir, and | not trou|ble you.
 
ROMEO
           ,            ,          ,           ,           ,
      So shalt | thou show | me friend|ship. Take | thou that:
        ,     2      ,    2            ,     T     T     T
      Live and be | prosperous:| and fare| well, good fellow.
 
BALTHASAR [Aside]
           ,           ,           ,         ,     ,
      For all | this same,| I'll hide | me here|about:
            ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      His looks | I fear,| and his | intents | I doubt.
 
[Retires]
 
ROMEO
        ,       ,        ,           ,         ,
45    Thou de|testa|ble maw,| thou womb | of death,
         ,                ,       ,       ,         ,
      Gorged with | the dear|est mor|sel of | the earth,
        ,   2     ,          ,         ,       ,
      Thus I en|force thy | rotten | jaws to | open,
           ,       ,            ,                  ,    ,
      And in | despite,| I'll cram | thee with / more food.
 
[Opens the tomb]
 
PARIS
        ,             ,          ,       ,     ,
      This is | that ban|ished haugh|ty Mon|tague,
            ,               ,     ,         ,            ,
50    That mur|dered my / love's cou|sin; with | which grief,
          ,       ,              ,    ,         ,
      It is | suppo|sed, the / fair crea|ture died;
            ,         ,        ,         ,    2      ,
      And here | is come | to do | some vil|lanous shame
        2      ,     ,       ,         ,      ,
      To the dead | bodies:| I will | appre|hend him.
 
[Comes forward]
        ,           ,          ,      T   T  . T
      Stop thy | unhal|lowed toil,| vile Montague:
           ,          ,        ,     ,               ,
55    Can ven|geance be | pursued | further | than death?
            ,      ,        ,       ,      ,
      Condemned | villain,| I do | appre|hend thee:
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      Obey | and go | with me;| for thou | must die.
 
ROMEO
          ,        ,          ,          ,       ,       ->
      I must | indeed;| and there|fore came | I hi||ther:
        ,      Tx     T      T        2   ,    2     ,
      Good | gentle youth, tempt | not a des|perate man;
       T    T    .    T           ,       ,            ,
60    Fly hence and leave | me: think | upon | these^gone;
       ,             ,            ,       ,            ,
      Let them | affright | thee. I | beseech | thee youth,
           ,      ,       ,      ,         ,
      Put not | ano|ther sin | upon | my head,
          ,       ,       ,     ,        ,
      By ur|ging me | to fu|ry: O | be gone,
            x         ,          ,        ,        ,
      By heaven | I love | thee bet|ter than | myself;
          ,         ,        ,         ,         ,
65    For I | come hi|ther armed | against | myself:
        T   T    .   T      ,              ,      ,
      Stay not, be gone,| live, and | hereaf|ter say,
         ,         ,       ,          ,      ,
      A mad|man's mer|cy bade | thee run | away.
 
PARIS
         ,      ,    ,       ,    ,
      I do | defy | thy com|miser|ation,
           ,      ,          ,       ,       ,
      And ap|prehend | thee for | a fe|lon here.
 
ROMEO
             ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
70    Wilt thou | provoke | me? Then | have at | thee boy.
 
[They fight]
 
PAGE
          ,           ,     ,             ,          ,
      O Lord | they fight,| I will | go call | the watch.
 
[Exit]
 
PARIS
        ,        ,          ,        ,     ,
      O I | am slain,| if thou | be mer|ciful,
      ,            ,     ,             ,    ,
      Open | the tomb,| lay me | with Ju|liet.
 
[Dies]
 
ROMEO
           ,         ,     ,    2     ,           ,
      In faith | I will.| Let me pe|ruse this | face.
      <-      ,  2      ,         ,        ,       ,
75      Mer||cutio's | kinsman,| noble | County | Paris,
             ,        ,          ,      ,        ,
      What said | my man,| when my | betos|sed soul
           ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      Did not | attend | him as | we rode?| I think
           ,        ,        ,           ,        ,    2  ->
      He told | me Pa|ris should | have mar|ried Ju||liet:
        ,      2     ,       ,        ,         ,
      Said | he not so?| Or did | I dream | it so?
          ,      ,      ,    2        ,        ,  2
80    Or am | I mad,| hearing him | talk of | Juliet,
           ,         ,     ,        ,             ,
      To think | it was | so? O | give me | thy hand,
            ,          ,        ,        ,           ,
      One writ | with me | in sour | misfor|tune's book.
            ,      ,     ,         ,         ,
      I'll bu|ry thee | in a | trium|phant grave;
          ,        ,      ,           ,           ,
      A grave;| O no,| a lan|tern; slaugh|tered youth:
            ,      ,   ,           2      ,       ,
85    For here | lies Ju/liet,| and her beau|ty makes
             ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      This vault | a feas|ting pre|sence full | of light.
        T    T    T      ,      2      T   T   .   T
      Death lie thou | there, by a | dead man interred.
 
[Laying PARIS in the tomb]
           ,          ,         ,         ,          ,
      How oft | when men | are at | the point | of death
             ,          ,        ,            ,         ,
      Have they | been mer|ry? Which | their kee|pers call
          ,             ,    ,        ,        ,
90    A light|ning be/fore death:| O how | may I
        ,             ,         ,        ,        ,
      Call this | a light|ning? O | my love, my wife,
        ,                  ,          ,      ,          ,
      Death that | hath sucked | the ho|ney of | thy breath,
            ,         ,      ,     ,         ,
      Hath had | no power | yet u|pon thy | beauty:
            ,         ,            ,        ,       ,
      Thou art | not con|quered; beau|ty's en|sign yet
           ,       ,         ,         ,          ,
95    Is crim|son in | thy lips | and in | thy cheeks,
       .     T      T    T        ,       ,        ,
      And death's pale flag | is not | advan|ced there.
       ,         ,            ,              ,       ,
      Tybalt,| liest thou | there in | thy blood|y sheet?
          ,          ,       ,       ,        ,
      O what | more fa|vour can | I do | to thee,
             ,           ,          ,          ,          ,
      Than with | that hand | that cut | thy youth | in twain
          ,       ,          ,           ,   ,
100   To sun|der his | that was | thine^en|emy?
           ,        ,        ,          ,    ,
      Forgive | me cou|sin. Ah | dear* Ju|liet:
           ,          ,         ,          ,       ,
      Why art | thou yet | so fair?| Shall I | believe
            ,      ,         ,         ,    ,
      That un|substan|tial death | is am|orous,
       ,               ,       ,       ,         ,
      And that | the lean | abhor|red mon|ster keeps
             ,         ,        ,        ,     ,
105   Thee here | in dark | to be | his par|amour?
            ,         ,        ,            ,           ,
      For fear | of that,| I still | will stay | with thee;
           ,       ,          ,            ,    ,
      And ne|ver from | this pa|lace of / dim night
          ,       ,      ,     ,                 ,
      Depart | again:| here, here / will I | remain
             ,           ,          ,        ,         ,
      With worms | that are | thy cham|ber-maids;| O here
           ,        ,       ,    ,         ,
110   Will I | set up | my ev|erlas|ting rest,
            ,           ,        ,    ,          ,
      And shake | the yoke | of in|auspi|cious stars
          2       ,      ,         T      T    T           ,
      From this world-|wearied | flesh. Eyes look | your last:
        ,               ,        ,           ,       ,
      Arms take^|your last | embrace:| and lips | O you
            ,           ,       ,             ,          ,
      The doors | of breath,| seal with | a right|eous kiss
          ,        ,        ,       ,         ,
115   A date|less bar|gain to | engros|sing death:
        ,           ,          ,       ,   2    ,
      Come bit|ter con|duct, come | unsa|vory guide,
            ,    2     ,       ,         ,         ,
      Thou des|perate pi|lot, now | at once | run on
            ,        ,          ,         ,       ,
      The dash|ing rocks | thy sea-|sick wea|ry bark:
        ,      2       ,
      Here's to my | love:
 
[Drinks]
                                 ,     ,     ,
120                        O | true a|pothe|cary:
            ,           ,       ,             ,       ,
      Thy drugs | are quick.| Thus with | a kiss | I die.
 
[Dies]
 
[Enter, at the other end of the churchyard, FRIAR LAURENCE, with a lantern, crow, and spade]
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
              ,       ,        ,          ,        ,
      Saint Fran|cis be | my speed,| how oft | tonight
                 ,    ,      ,              ,             ,
      Have my / old feet | stumbled | at graves?| Who's there?
 
BALTHASAR
              ,         ,          ,           ,           ,
      Here's one,| a friend,| and one | that knows | you well.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,          ,           ,         ,          ,
125   Bliss be | upon | you. Tell | me good | my friend
             ,          ,           ,       ,           ,
      What torch | is yond,| that vain|ly lends | his light
           ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      To grubs | and eye|less skulls?| As I | discern,
          ,        ,        ,        ,     ,
      It bur|neth in | the Ca|pel's mon|ument.
 
BALTHASAR
           ,        ,     ,           ,          ,      ->
      It doth | so ho|ly sir;| and there's | my mas||ter,
       ,        2      ,
130   One | that you love.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
                                ,
                           Who is | it?
 
BALTHASAR
                                         ,   ,
                                        Ro|meo.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
            ,                ,    ,
      How long | hath he / been there?
 
BALTHASAR
                                             ,         ,
                                      Full half | an hour.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
       T   T   T     2      ,
      Go with me | to the vault.
 
BALTHASAR
                                       ,         ,
135                                I dare | not sir.
          ,        ,      ,                 ,    ,
      My mas|ter knows | not but | I am / gone hence;
            ,      ,        ,       ,          ,
      And fear|fully | did men|ace me | with death,
         ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      If I | did stay | to look | on his | intents.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,                ,      ,      ,       2   ,
      Stay, then | I'll go | alone.| Fear comes u|pon me:
          ,        ,          ,        ,      ,
140   O much | I fear | some ill | unluck|y thing.
 
BALTHASAR
         ,         ,      ,   2        T    T    T
      As I | did sleep | under this | yew-tree here,
           ,         ,       ,      ,         ,
      I dreamt | my mas|ter and | ano|ther fought,
            ,        ,        ,
      And that | my mas|ter slew | him.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
                                        ,   ,
                                       Ro|meo.
         ,       ,           ,          ,             ,
145   Alack,| alack,| what blood | is this | which stains
           ,      ,         ,         ,      ,
      The sto|ny en|trance of | this se|pulchre?
             ,           ,       ,         ,       ,
      What mean | these mas|terless | and go|ry swords
          ,        ,         ,          ,          ,
      To lie | disco|loured by | this place | of peace?
 
[Enters the tomb]
       , 2         ,          ,          ,      ,
      Romeo,| oh pale:| Who else?| What Pa|ris too?
             ,           ,          ,        ,        ,
150   And steeped | in blood?| Ah what | an un|kind^hour
           ,    2     ,       ,    2      ,
      Is guil|ty of this | lamen|table chance?
      <-     ,       ,   ->
        The la||dy stirs.
 
[JULIET wakes]
 
JULIET
         ,     2      ,        ,       2     ,
      O com|fortable fri|ar, where | is my lord?
         ,      ,        ,          ,           ,
      I do | remem|ber well | where I | should be,
            ,        ,     ,            ,   ,
155   And there | I am.| Where is | my Ro|meo?
 
[Noise within]
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
          ,           ,      ,       ,                ,
      I hear | some noise.| Lady,| come from | that nest
           ,         ,              , ,   2     ,
      Of death,| conta|gion, and / unna|tural sleep:
          ,        ,           ,        ,       ,
      A grea|ter power | than we | can con|tradict
             ,        ,        ,       ,           ,
      Hath thwar|ted our | intents.| Come, come^|away.
           ,        ,        ,       ,            ,
160   Thy hus|band in | thy bo|som there | lies dead;
           ,      ,      ,             ,          ,
      And Pa|ris too.| Come I'll | dispose | of thee
         ,       ,       ,        ,      ,
      Among | a sis|terhood | of ho|ly nuns:
        ,     2       ,           2      ,         ,     
      Stay not to | question,| for the watch | is com|ing;
      <-  ,      ,         ,  2        ,        ,        ,
        Come,|| go good | Juliet,| I dare | no lon|ger stay.
 
[Exit FRIAR LAURENCE]
 
JULIET
          ,           ,         ,         ,      ,
165   Go get | thee hence,| for I | will not | away.
               ,       ,       ,     2       T    T      T
      What's^here?| A cup | closed in my | true love's hand?
       ,          ,           ,          ,        ,
      Poison | I see | hath been | his time|less end:
          ,            ,          ,         ,         ,
      O churl,| drunk^all,| and left | no friend|ly drop
           ,        ,      ,          ,          ,
      To help | me af|ter? I | will kiss | thy lips;
       ,            ,       ,           ,         ,
170   Haply | some poi|son yet | doth hang | on them,
           ,     ,              ,      ,    oo
      To make | die with a | resto|rative.|
 
[Kisses him]
            ,          ,
      Thy lips | are warm.
 
FIRST WATCHMAN [Within]
                            __    ___          ,
                           Lead | boy:| which way?
 
JULIET
            ,       ,      2       ,         ,       ,
      Yea noise?| Then I'll be | brief. O | happy | dagger,
 
[Snatching ROMEO's dagger]
        ,              ,             ,         ,        ,
175   This is | thy sheath;| there^rust | and let | me die.
 
[Stabs herself, falls on ROMEO's body, and dies. Enter Watch, with the Page of PARIS]
 
PAGE
        ,             ,       ,                 ,            ,
      This is | the place;| there where | the torch | doth burn.
 
FIRST WATCHMAN
                x        ,        ,       ,           ,
      The ground is | bloody;| search a|bout the | churchyard*:
           ,        ,        ,          ,        ,
      Go some | of you,| whoere | you find | attach.
       ,         ,       ,               ,       ,
      Piti|ful sight,| here lies | the coun|ty slain,
           ,   2    ,          ,         ,       ,
180   And Ju|liet blee|ding, warm | and new|ly dead,
            ,           ,           ,      ,   ,
      Who here | hath lain | these two | days bur/ied.
           ,           ,      ,            ,     ,
      Go tell | the prince:| run to | the Cap|ulets:
             ,        ,      ,         ,          ,
      Raise^up | the Mon|tagues:| some o|thers search:
          ,           ,           ,           ,        ,
      We see | the ground | whereon | these woes | do lie;
                  ,     ,         ,           ,   2     ,
185   But the / true ground | of all | these pi|teous woes
          ,           ,    ,        ,         ,
      We can|not wi/thout cir|cumstance | descry.
 
[Re-enter some of the Watch, with BALTHASAR]
 
SECOND WATCHMAN
              ,   2    ,         ,      ,    2         ,
      Here's Ro|meo's man;| we found | him in the | churchyard*.
 
FIRST WATCHMAN
        ,     2       ,        ,           ,           ,
      Hold him in | safety,| till the | prince come | hither.
 
[Re-enter others of the Watch, with FRIAR LAURENCE]
 
THIRD WATCHMAN
        ,           x            ,          ,           ,
      Here is | a friar | that trem|bles, sighs,| and weeps:
           ,          ,        ,           ,           ,
190   We took | this mat|tock and | this spade | from him,
          ,        ,        ,            ,           ,
      As he | was com|ing from | this church|yard* side.
 
FIRST WATCHMAN
          ,         ,         ,         ,      ,
      A great | suspi|cion: stay | the fri|ar too.
 
[Enter the PRINCE and Attendants]
 
PRINCE
            ,     ,        ,       ,      ,
      What mis|adven|ture is | so ear|ly up,
             ,          ,        ,         ,           ,
      That calls | our per|son from | our mor|ning's rest?
 
[Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others]
 
CAPULET
              ,         ,          ,          ,        ,
195   What should | it be,| that they | so shriek | abroad?
 
LADY CAPULET
           ,       ,          ,      ,   ,
      The peo|ple in | the street | cry Ro/meo,
            ,   2           ,   ,             ,   ,
      Some Ju|liet, and / some Pa|ris; and / all run
           ,      ,   ,                ,     ,
      With o|pen out|cry toward | our mon|ument.
 
PRINCE
             ,         ,            ,        ,         ,
      What fear | is this | which star|tles in | our ears?
 
FIRST WATCHMAN
       ,   2        T    T   .    T      ,       ,
200   Sovereign,| here lies the Coun|ty Pa|ris slain;
           ,  2    ,         ,  2      ,        ,
      And Ro|meo dead;| and Ju|liet, dead | before,
        T   .   T     T
      Warm and new killed.
 
PRINCE
                               __      __    oo
                             Search,| seek,|
            ,                 ,   ,        ,     oo
      And know | how this / foul mur|der comes.|
FIRST WATCHMAN
        ,           x            ,          ,   2    ,
205   Here is | a friar,| and slaugh|tered Ro|meo's man;
            ,       ,       ,          ,       ,     ->
      With in|struments | upon | them fit | to o||pen
        ,       T    T     T
      These | dead men's tombs. \\
 
CAPULET
           x         ,      ,              ,          ,
      O heaven!| O wife | look how | our daugh|ter bleeds!
            ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
      This dag|ger hath | mistane,| for lo | his house
          ,      ,         ,        ,     ,
210   Is emp|ty on | the back | of Mon|tague,
         2    ,     ,         ,        ,           ,
      And is mis-|sheathed | in my | daughter's | bosom.
 
LADY CAPULET
         ,          ,          ,         ,       ,
      O me,| this sight | of death | is as | a bell,
             ,         ,     ,          ,      ,
      That warns | my old | age to | a sep|ulchre.
 
[Enter MONTAGUE and others]
 
PRINCE
            ,     ,          ,         ,      ,
      Come^Mon|tague;| for thou | art ear|ly up,
          ,         ,          ,          ,       ,
215   To see | thy son | and heir | more ear|ly down.
 
MONTAGUE
        ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
      Alas | my liege,| my wife | is dead | tonight;
        ,             ,      ,              ,             ,
      Grief of | my son's | exile | hath stopped | her breath:
            ,        ,          ,         ,           ,
      What fur|ther woe | conspires | against | mine age?
 
PRINCE
       __          ,           ,    oo   oo
      Look:| and thou | shalt see.|    |
 
MONTAGUE
          ,         ,           ,        ,        ,
220   O thou | untaught,| what man|ners is | in this?
           ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      To press | before | thy fa|ther to | a grave?
 
PRINCE
            ,         ,         ,    ,            ,
      Seal^up | the mouth | of out|rage for | a while,
            ,         ,            ,    ,    ,
      Till we | can clear | these am|bigu|ities,
            ,             ,             ,            ,        ,
      And know | their spring,| their head,| their true | descent;
            ,         ,       ,    2   ,          ,
225   And then | will I | be gen|eral of | your woes,
            ,        ,    2     ,           ,         ,
      And lead | you e|ven to death:| meantime | forbear,
           ,          ,          ,         ,        o
      And let | mischance | be slave | to pa|tience.
               ,         ,        ,      ,        o
      Bring forth | the par|ties of | suspi|cion.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
      ,            ,        ,           ,   ,
      I am | the grea|test, a|ble to / do least,
            ,        ,       ,         ,          ,
230   Yet most | suspec|ted as | the time | and place
             ,        ,      ,   2         ,        ,
      Doth make | against | me of this | direful | murder;
            ,        ,       ,           ,           ,
      And here | I stand | both to | impeach | and purge
          ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      Myself | condem|ned and | myself | excused.
 
PRINCE
            ,         ,           ,           ,         ,
      Then say | at once | what thou | dost know | in this.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
          ,         ,                ,     ,          ,
235   I will | be brief,| for my / short date | of breath
          ,         ,        ,      ,   2     ,
      Is not | so long | as is | a te|dious tale.
       , 2            ,         ,      2     ,     ,  2
      Romeo | there dead,| was hus|band to that | Juliet;
           ,            ,            ,   2     ,         ,
      And she | there dead,| that's Ro|meo's faith|ful wife:
         ,         ,       2       ,       ,         ,
      I mar|ried them;| and their sto|len mar|riage day
           ,          ,          ,         ,       ,
240   Was Ty|balt's dooms|day, whose | untime|ly death
       ,      2       T    T    T     ,       2       ,
      Banished the | new-made bride|groom from the | city,
            ,         ,         ,        ,   2    ,
      For whom |(and not | for Ty|balt) Ju|liet pined.
       ,            ,           ,          ,           ,
      You, to | remove | that siege | of grief | from her,
           ,            ,           ,        ,         ,
      Betrothed | and would | have mar|ried her | perforce
           ,      ,        ,           ,        ,
245   To Coun|ty Pa|ris: then | comes she | to me,
                    ,    ,      ,           ,           ,
      And (with / wild looks)| bid me | devise | some means
          ,          ,          ,       ,         o
      To rid | her from | this se|cond mar|riage,
          ,        ,      ,                 ,         ,
      Or in | my cell | there would | she kill | herself.
             ,       ,        ,        ,       ,
      Then gave | I her |(so tu|tored by | my art,
          ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
250   A slee|ping po|tion; which | so took | effect
         ,      ,        ,          ,          ,
      As I | inten|ded, for | it wrought | on her
            ,         ,       ,     2      ,        , 2
      The form | of death:| meantime I | writ to | Romeo,
            ,           ,        ,                ,    ,
      That he | should hit|her come | as this / dire night,
           ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      To help | to take | her from | her bor|rowed grave,
       ,            ,         ,          ,              ,
255   Being | the time | the po|tion's force | should cease.
           ,           ,        ,        ,       ,
      But he | which bore | my let|ter, Fri|ar John,
             ,         ,     ,         ,       ,
      Was stayed | by ac|cident,| and yes|ternight
           ,         ,        ,          ,       ,
      Returned | my let|ter back.| Then all | alone
                ,   ,      ,      ,        ,
      At the / prefixed | hour | of her | waking,
           ,        ,          ,         ,           ,
260   Came^I | to take | her from | her kin|dred's vault;
       ,             ,          ,       ,        ,
      Meaning | to keep | her close|ly at | my cell,
           ,       ,     3  3        ,        ,   ,
      Till I | conven|iently could send | to Ro|meo:
            ,        ,          ,       ,          ,
      But when | I came |(some^mi|nute ere | the time
          ,      ,         ,        ,      ,
      Of her | awa|king) here | untime|ly lay
           ,      ,             ,   ,  2    ,
265   The no|ble Pa|ris and / true Ro|meo dead.
            ,         ,       ,              ,    ,
      She wakes;| and I | entrea|ted her / come forth,
            ,           ,          x           ,         o
      And bear | this work | of heaven | with pa|tience:
            ,        ,           ,          ,          ,
      But then | a noise | did scare | me from | the tomb;
           ,         ,     2      ,          ,         ,
      And she |(too des|perate) would | not go | with me,
            ,        ,          ,    2    ,        ,
270   But (as | it seems)| did vi|olence on | herself.
            ,    T   T    T     ,        ,
      All this | I know; and | to the | marriage
            ,         ,       ,         ,          ,
      Her nurse | is pri|vy: and | if aught | in this
          ,             ,   ,               ,    ,
      Miscar|ried by / my fault,| let my / old life
          ,      ,            ,        ,          ,
      Be sac|rificed,| some^hour | before | his time,
       ,          ,       ,      ,       ,
275   Unto | the ri|gour of | seve|rest law.
 
PRINCE
           ,            ,           ,       ,     ,
      We still | have known | thee for | a ho|ly man.
               ,   2    ,      ,         ,  ,
      Where's^Ro|meo's man?| What can | he say / in this?
 
BALTHASAR
           ,          ,        ,        ,   2      ,
      I brought | my mas|ter news | of Ju|liet's death;
            ,         ,         ,          ,    ,
      And then | in post | he came | from Man|tua
                  ,    ,                 ,   ,     ,
280   To this / same place,| to this / same mon|ument.
            ,     2    ,      ,         ,         ,       2->
      This let|ter he ear|ly bid | me give | his fa||ther,
            ,          ,          ,      ,   2           ,
      And threa|tened me | with death,| going in | the vault,
      ,     ,        ,          ,         ___
      I de|parted | not and | left him | there.
 
PRINCE
        ,            ,       ,          ,        ,
      Give me | the let|ter; I | will look | on it.
        ,              ,         ,            ,           ,
285   Where is | the coun|ty's page | that raised | the watch?
       ,              ,          ,       ,          ,
      Sirrah,| what made | your mas|ter in | this place?
 
PAGE
           ,          ,      2     ,          ,        ,
      He came | with flo|wers to strew | his la|dy's grave;
           ,         ,        ,         ,      ,
      And bid | me stand | aloof,| and so | I did:
        ,           ,           ,         ,          ,
      Anon | comes one | with light | to ope | the tomb;
           ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
290   And by | and by | my mas|ter drew | on him;
            ,       ,      ,         ,          ,
      And then | I ran | away | to call | the watch.
 
PRINCE
            ,        ,           ,         ,         ,
      This let|ter doth | make^good | the fri|ar's words,
               ,          ,         ,        ,         ,
      Their course | of love,| the ti|dings of | her death:
            ,          ,       ,    2       ,       ,
      And here | he writes | that he did | buy a | poison
               ,   ,      x          ,       ,
295   Of a / poor po|thecary,| and there|withal
        ,    2         ,         ,          ,          ,  2
      Came to this | vault to | die, and | lie with | Juliet.
        T    T   T     ,     ,
      Where be these | ene|mies?
       ,         ,     ,    oo
      Capu|let, Mon|tague,|      (tetra with prev)
       ,      2       ,           ,     ,           ,
      See what a | scourge is | laid u|pon your | hate,
      <-          Tx     T     T          ,           ,           ,
300     That || heaven finds means | to kill | your joys | with love.
          ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      And I | for win|king at | your dis|cords too
             ,        ,         ,         ,         ,        2->
      Have lost | a brace | of kin|smen: all | are pun||ished.
 
CAPULET
         ,        ,     ,      ,             ,
      O bro|ther Mon|tague,| give me | thy hand:
        ,            ,           ,               ,   ,
      This is | my daugh|ter's join|ture, for / no more
          ,       ,
305   Can I | demand.
 
MONTAGUE
                         ,         ,           ,
                     But I | can give | thee more:
          ,          ,          ,             ,    ,
      For I | will raise | her sta|tue in / pure gold;
             ,        ,     ,          ,         ,
      That while | Vero|na by | that name | is known,
              ,         ,       ,          ,        ,
      There shall | no fi|gure at | such rate | be set
           ,         ,          ,        ,    ,
310   As that | of true | and faith|ful Ju|liet.
 
CAPULET
           ,           ,   2    ,        ,       ,
      As rich | shall Ro|meo's by | his la|dy's lie;
             ,     ,      ,        ,    ,
      Poor* sa|crifi|ces of | our en|mity.
 
PRINCE
          ,         ,           ,         ,          ,
      A gloo|ming peace | this mor|ning with | it brings;
           ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      The sun | for sor|row will | not show | his head:
           ,          ,           ,                ,     ,
315   Go hence,| to have | more talk | of these / sad things;
        ,              ,                 ,   ,     ,
      Some shall | be par|doned, and / some pun|ished:
           ,      ,       ,            ,   ,
      For ne|ver was | a sto|ry of / more woe
             ,        ,   ,       2     ,   ,
      Than this | of Ju|liet | and her Ro|meo.
 
[Exeunt]

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