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Romeo and Juliet

Act IV, Scene 5

Juliet's chamber.
 
[Enter Nurse]
 
NURSE
       ,                ,          ,    ,   oo
      Mistress,|  what mis|tress? Jul|iet?|
        ,       ,             ,
      Fast I | warrant | her she.  \\
            ,         ,      ,          ,      ,
      Why lamb,| why la|dy, fie | you slug|-a-bed,
            ,       ,     ,        ,                 ,
      Why love | I say?| Madam,| sweetheart*:| why bride?
        ,            ,          ,          ,    2       ,
5     What not | a word?| You take | your pen|nyworths^now.
        ,      2      ,               ,      ,        ,
      Sleep for a | week, for | the next | night I | warrant
            ,      ,       ,         ,         ,
      The Coun|ty Pa|ris hath | set^up | his rest,
            ,            ,           x      ,        ,
      That you | shall rest | but little,| God for|give me:
       ,            ,          ,         ,       ,
      Marry | and amen:| how sound | is she | asleep?
       2       ,       ,         ,       ,       ,
10    I must needs | wake her.| Madam,| madam,| madam,
       ,               ,       ,         ,         ,
      Aye, let | the coun|ty take | you in | your bed;
               ,          ,        ,           ,        ,
      He'll fright | you up | in faith.| Will it | not be?
 
[Undraws the curtains]
               ,          ,           ,            ,       ,
      What dressed,| and in | your clothes,| and down | again?
       2       ,       ,         ,      ,      ,
      I must needs | wake you;| Lady,| lady,| lady?
        ,      ,           ,        ,        ,
15    Alas,| alas,| help help,| my la|dy's dead,
          ,      ,         ,     ,         ,
      O well-|a-day,| that e|ver I | was born,
           ,    2   ,     ,         ,         ,
      Some a|qua vitae | ho, my | lord, my | lady?
 
[Enter LADY CAPULET]
 
LADY CAPULET
             ,          ,
      What noise | is here?
 
NURSE
                             2   ,    2    ,
                            O lamen|table day.
 
LADY CAPULET
      <-  ,             ,
20      What is || the mat|ter?
 
NURSE
                                  ,      T   T  T      ,
                                Look,| look, O hea|vy day.
 
LADY CAPULET
         ,      ,        ,         ,      ,
      O me,| O me,| my child,| my on|ly life:
          ,          ,      ,         ,           ,
      Revive,| look up,| or I | will die | with thee:
       __     __     __     __
      Help,| help,| Call | help.
 
[Enter CAPULET]
 
CAPULET
      <-      ,        ,    ,          ,            ,        __
25      For shame,|| bring Ju/liet | forth; her | lord is | come.
 
NURSE
              ,         ,             ,       ,         ,
      She's dead,| deceased,| she's dead;| alack | the day.
 
LADY CAPULET
         ,         ,            ,            ,            ,
      Alack | the day,| she's dead,| she's dead,| she's dead.
 
CAPULET
       ,            ,          ,      ,            ,
      Ha? Let | me see | her: out | alas | she's cold,
            ,         ,        ,           ,           ,
      Her blood | is set|tled and | her joints | are stiff;
        ,     2         ,           ,          ,    ,
30    Life and these^|lips have | long been | sepa|rated:
        T     T   T    ,               ,       ,
      Death lies on | her like^|an untime|ly frost
        ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Upon | the swee|test flower | of all | the field.
 
NURSE
      ,     ,         ,
      O la|menta|ble day!
 
LADY CAPULET
                             ,        ,
                          O woe|ful time.
 
CAPULET
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
35    Death, that hath tane her hence to make me wail,
        ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.
 
[Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS, with Musicians]
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,              ,      ,          ,         ,
      Come, is | the bride | ready | to go | to church?
 
CAPULET
       ,          ,        ,      ,       ,
      Ready | to go,| but ne|ver to | return.
         ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      O son,| the night | before | thy wed|ding-day
        T    T     T                 ,     ,           ,
40    Hath Death lain | with thy / wife. There | she lies,
       ,                 ,     ,   ,            ,
      Flower | as she / was,| de|flowered | by him.
        ,            ,       ,      ,             ,
      Death is | my son-|in-law,| Death is | my heir;
           ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      My daugh|ter he | hath wed|ded: I | will die,
            ,          ,      ,   ,                  ,
      And leave | him all | life liv/ing, all^|is Death's.
 
PARIS
                  ,      ,        ,          ,           ,
45    Have I / thought long | to see | this mor|ning's face,
            ,         ,         ,        ,          ,
      And doth | it give | me such | a sight | as this?
 
LADY CAPULET
           ,        ,        ,          ,       ,
      Accursed,| unhap|py, wretch|ed, hate|ful day.
        ,   ,             ,          T    T   T
      Most mis/erable | hour that | ere time saw
          ,        ,       ,        ,       ,
      In las|ting la|bour of | his pil|grimage.
           ,      T   T    T      ,         ,          ,  ->
50    But one,| poor one, one | poor and | loving || child,
             ,    ,             ,          ,    2
      But | one thing / to re|joice and | solace in,
           ,       ,             ,           ,         ,
      And cru|el death | hath catched | it from | my sight.
 
NURSE
         ,       ,        ,        ,       ,
      O woe,| O woe|ful, woe|ful, woe|ful day,
        ,      ,         ,          ,       ,
      Most la|menta|ble day,| most^woe|ful day,
           ,      ,      ,        ,        ,
55    That e|ver, e|ver, I | did yet | behold.
         ,       ,       ,        ,       ,
      O day,| O day,| O day,| O hate|ful day,
       ,            ,         ,        ,         ,
      Never | was seen | so black | a day | as this:
         ,       ,    T  T  T    ___
      O woe|ful day,| O woeful | day.
 
PARIS
           ,          ,       ,         ,       ___
      Beguiled,| divorced,| wronged,| spited,| slain,
        ,      ,          ,          ,         ,
60    Most de|testa|ble death,| by thee | beguiled,
           ,       T     T     T     ,      __
      By cruel,| cruel thee, quite | over|thrown:
          ,        ,          ,          ,         ,
      O love,| O life;| not life,| but love | in death.
 
CAPULET
           ,           ,       ,        ,          __
      Despised,| distressed,| hated,| martyred,| killed,
         ,      ,       ,          ,           ,
      Uncom|forta|ble time,| why camst | thou now
          ,        ,       ,       ,     ,
65    To mur|der, mur|der our | solem|nity?
          ,         ,          ,         ,         ,
      O child,| O child;| my soul,| and not | my child,
        T   T    T       ,         ,          ,
      Dead art thou,| Alack | my child | is dead,
            ,         ,          ,         ,    ,
      And with | my child,| my joys | are bur|ied.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,              ,         ,          ,           ,
      Peace ho | for shame,| confu|sions: Care | lives not
           ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
70    In these | confu|sions, hea|ven and | yourself
            ,                ,    ,           x           ,
      Had part | in this / fair maid;| now heaven | hath all,
           ,         ,       ,       ,          ,
      And all | the bet|ter is | it for | the maid:
             ,        ,          ,           ,           ,
      Your part | in her | you could | not keep | from death,
           ,        ,           ,      2   ,       ,
      But hea|ven keeps | his part | in eter|nal life.
            ,           ,          ,        ,       o
75    The most | you sought | was her | promo|tion;
             ,          ,       ,            ,        ,
      For 'twas | your hea|ven she | should be | advanced:
            ,        ,     ,            ,        ,
      And weep | ye now,| seeing | she is | advanced
         ,           ,          ,          x         ,
      Above | the clouds,| as high | as heaven | itself?
         ,          ,          ,           ,         ,
      O in | this love,| you love | your child | so ill,
                  ,   ,     ,             ,         ,
80    That you / run mad,| seeing | that she | is well:
             ,      ,   ,                T    T   .    T
      She's not | well mar/ried that | lives married long;
            ,       ,   ,                T   T   .    T
      But she's | best mar/ried that | dies married young.
           ,          ,           ,            ,   ,
      Dry^up | your tears,| and stick | your rose|mary
                  ,    ,          ,        ,       ,
      On this / fair corse;| and as | the cus|tom is,
          ,          ,       ,      ,              ,
85    In all | her best | array | bear her | to church:
             ,           ,        ,        ,        ,
      For though | fond^na|ture bids | us all | lament,
           ,          ,          ,         ,      ,
      Yet na|ture's tears | are rea|son's mer|riment.
 
CAPULET
             ,           ,      ,       ,     ,
      All things | that we | ordai|ned fes|tival,
        ,                ,             ,    ,    ,
      Turn from | their of|fice to / black fu|neral;
           ,       ,         ,     ,       ,
90    Our in|struments | to mel|ancho|ly bells,
           ,         ,             ,   ,   2    ,
      Our wed|ding cheer | to a / sad bur|ial feast,
           ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      Our sol|emn hymns | to sul|len dir|ges change,
           ,       ,         ,        2   ,        ,
      Our bri|dal flo|wers serve | for a bur|ied corse,
           ,       T      T     T     ,    2     ,
      And all | things change them | to the con|trary.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
           ,        ,        ,       ,         ,
95    Sir go | you in;| and ma|dam, go | with him;
           ,        ,       ,     ,         ,
      And go | Sir Pa|ris; ev|eryone | prepare
          ,               ,    ,        ,         ,
      To fol|low this / fair corse | unto | her grave:
           ,      2     ,      ,                ,   ,
      The hea|vens do lour | upon | you for / some ill;
        ,              ,         ,                 ,    ,
      Move them | no more | by cros|sing their / high will.
 
[Exeunt CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, PARIS, and FRIAR LAURENCE]
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
        ,             ,     ,         ,              ,
100   Faith we | may put | up our | pipes and | be gone.
 
NURSE
       ,         ,            ,        ,        ,
      Honest | goodfel|lows: ah | put^up,| put^up;
            ,          ,      ,          ,    2    ,
      For well | you know,| this is | a pit|iful case.
 
[Exit]
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
Aye, by my troth, the case may be amended.
 
[Enter PETER]
 
PETER
Musicians, O, musicians, Heart's ease, Heart's ease: O, an you will have me live, play 'Heart's ease.'
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
Why Heart's ease?
 
PETER
O, musicians, because my heart itself plays My heart is full of woe: O, play me some merry dump, to comfort me.
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
Not a dump we; 'tis no time to play now.
 
PETER
You will not, then?
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
No.
 
PETER
I will then give it you soundly.
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
What will you give us?
 
PETER
No money, on my faith, but the gleek; I will give you the minstrel.
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
Then I will give you the serving-creature.
 
PETER
Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on your pate. I will carry no crotchets: I'll re you, I'll fa you; do you note me?
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
An you re us and fa us, you note us.
 
SECOND MUSICIAN
Pray you, put up your dagger, and put out your wit.
 
PETER
Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you with an iron wit, and put up my iron dagger. Answer me like men:
            ,         ,           ,            ,
      When gri|ping grief | the heart | doth wound,
            ,        ,           ,        ,
      And dole|ful dumps | the mind | oppress,
            ,       ,         ,        ,
105   Then mu|sic with | her sil|ver sound--
 
Why silver sound? Why music with her silver sound? What say you, Simon Catling?
 
THIRD MUSICIAN
Marry, sir, because silver hath a sweet sound.
 
PETER
Pretty! What say you, Hugh Rebeck?
 
SECOND MUSICIAN
I say silver sound, because musicians sound for silver.
 
PETER
Pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?
 
THIRD MUSICIAN
Faith, I know not what to say.
 
PETER
O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say for you. It is music with her silver sound, because musicians have no gold for sounding: Then music with her silver sound With speedy help doth lend redress.
 
[Exit]
 
FIRST MUSICIAN
What a pestilent knave is this same!
 
SECOND MUSICIAN
Hang him, Jack! Come, we'll in here; tarry for the mourners, and stay dinner.
 
[Exeunt]

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