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Romeo and Juliet

Act IV, Scene 1

Friar Laurence's cell.
 
[Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS]
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
           ,        ,          ,        ,      ,
      On Thurs|day sir?| The time | is ve|ry short.
 
PARIS
          ,       ,    ,           ,        ,
      My fa|ther Cap|ulet | will have | it so;
          ,       ,         ,         ,           ,
      And I | am no|thing slow | to slack | his haste.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
           ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      You say | you do | not know | the la|dy's mind:
        ,      ,          ,         ,        ,
5     Une|ven is | the course,| I like | it not.
 
PARIS
         ,    2   ,         ,          ,          ,
      Immod|erately | she weeps | for Ty|balt's death,
            ,          ,       ,         ,          ,
      And there|fore have | I lit|tle talked | of love;
           ,        ,      ,           ,          ,
      For Ven|us smiles | not in | a house | of tears.
           ,         ,         ,         ,      ,
      Now sir,| her fa|ther counts | it dan|gerous
            ,           ,         ,       ,          ,
10    That she | doth give | her sor|row so | much sway,
           ,        ,         ,          ,         o
      And in | his wis|dom hastes | our mar|riage,
           ,         ,    ,       ,         ,
      To stop | the in|unda|tion of | her tears;
             ,          ,       ,        ,       ,
      Which too | much^min|ded by | herself | alone,
           ,         ,         ,      ,   ,
      May be | put from | her by | soci|ety:
           ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
15    Now do | you know | the rea|son of | this haste.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE [Aside]
          ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
      I would | I knew | not why | it should | be slowed.
        ,          ,               ,       ,           ,
      Look sir,| here comes | the la|dy towards | my cell.
 
[Enter JULIET]
 
PARIS
       ,        ,        ,     ,         ,
      Happi|ly met,| my la|dy and | my wife.
 
JULIET
            ,        ,         ,        ,       ,
      That may | be sir,| when I | may be | a wife.
 
PARIS
            ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
20    That may | be, must | be love,| on Thurs|day next.
 
JULIET
             ,         ,
      What must | be shall | be.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
                                   ,        ,         ,
                                That's | a cer|tain text.
 
PARIS
        ,     2       ,       ,         ,         ,
      Come you to | make con|fession | to this | father?
 
JULIET
          ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      To an|swer that,| I should | confess | to you.
 
PARIS
          ,       ,       ,          ,      ,
25    Do not | deny | to him | that you | love me.
 
JULIET
          ,         ,        ,         ,         ,
      I will | confess | to you | that I | love^him.
 
PARIS
           ,        ,        ,          ,          ,
      So will | ye, I | am sure | that you | love^me.
 
JULIET
         ,       ,        ,              ,    ,
      If I | do so,| it will | be of / more price,
        2     ,         ,           ,          ,          ,
      Being spoke | behind | your back,| than to | your face.
 
PARIS
              ,          ,         ,       ,            ,
30    Poor* soul,| thy face | is much | abused | with tears.
 
JULIET
            ,           ,      ,    ,              ,
      The tears | have got | small vic/tory | by that;
           ,        ,       ,         ,            ,
      For it | was bad | enough | before | their spite.
 
PARIS
              ,           ,           ,            ,        ,
      Thou wrongst | it more | than tears | with that | report.
 
JULIET
            ,        ,       ,           ,       ,
      That is | no slan|der sir,| which is | a truth;
            ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
35    And what | I spake,| I spake | it to | thy face.
 
PARIS
            ,         ,          ,           ,         ,
      Thy face | is mine,| and thou | hast slan|dered it.
 
JULIET
          ,        ,        ,       ,          ,
      It may | be so,| for it | is not | mine own.
           ,        ,         ,     ,       ,
      Are you | at lei|sure, ho|ly fa|ther now;
           ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Or shall | I come | to you | at eve|ning mass?
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
          ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
40    My lei|sure serves | me pen|sive daugh|ter now.
           ,         ,        ,           ,       ,
      My lord | we must | entreat | the time | alone.
 
PARIS
       T     T   .    T         ,        ,
      God shield I should | disturb | devo|tion,
      <- ,    ,         ,        ,       ,        ,         ->
        Ju||liet,| on Thurs|day ear|ly will | I rouse || ye:
        ,        2   ,          ,          ,      ,
      Till | then adieu;| and keep | this ho|ly kiss.
 
[Exit]
 
JULIET
          ,          ,         ,            ,      ,
45    O shut | the door,| and when | thou hast | done so,
             ,          ,          ,           ,           ,
      Come^weep | with me;| past hope,| past cure,| past help.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
          ,    ,      ,   2     ,          ,
      Oh Ju|liet,| I al|ready know | thy grief;
            ,           ,         ,        ,        ,
      It strains | me past | the com|pass of | my wits:
          ,           ,         ,        ,            x
      I hear | thou must | and no|thing may | prorogue it,
           ,         ,        ,        ,          ,     ->
50    On Thurs|day next | be mar|ried to | this coun||ty.
 
JULIET
        ,        ,     ,   2               ,          ,
      Tell | me not | friar that | thou hearst | of this,
          ,           ,        ,       ,        ,         ->
      Unless | thou tell | me how | I may | prevent || it:
       ,     2     ,         ,            ,         ,
      If | in thy wis|dom, thou | canst give | no help,
           ,          ,        ,    ,        ,
      Do thou | but call | my re|solu|tion wise,
            ,           ,            ,        ,       ,
55    And with | this knife | I'll help | it pre|sently.
             ,          ,          ,   2      ,          ,
      God^joined | my heart | and Ro|meo's, thou | our hands;
           ,           ,         ,        ,  2     ,
      And ere | this hand | by thee | to Ro|meo sealed,
             ,        ,      ,     ,        ,
      Shall be | the la|bel to | ano|ther deed,
                ,    ,            ,       ,        ,
      Or my / true heart | with trea|cherous | revolt
        ,         ,         ,            ,           ,
60    Turn to | ano|ther, this | shall slay | them both:
        ,          ,             ,       ,    2     ,
      Therefore,| out of | thy long-|exper|ienced time,
        ,             ,         ,        ,       ,
      Give me | some^pre|sent coun|sel, or | behold
              ,        ,          ,          ,       ,
      'Twixt^my | extremes | and me | this blood|y knife
              ,         ,        ,     ,        ,
      Shall play | the um|pire, ar|bitra|ting that,
        ,             ,        ,         ,          ,
65    Which the | commis|sion of | thy years | and art
        ,            ,            ,   ,       ,
      Could to | no is|sue of / true hon|or bring.
          ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      Be not | so long | to speak;| I long | to die,
           ,            ,             ,        ,    ,
      If what | thou speakst | speak^not | of re|medy.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,    ,                ,        ,         ,
      Hold daugh/ter: I | do spy | a kind | of hope,
               ,         ,      ,        ,   ,      2->
70    Which craves | as des|perate | an ex|ecu||tion
           ,        ,    2      ,          ,          ,
      As that | is des|perate which | we would | prevent.
       ,  ,          2      ,        ,       ,
      If ra/ther than to | marry | County | Paris,
             ,            ,           ,         ,         ,
      Thou hast | the strength | of will | to slay | thyself,
            ,        ,       ,          ,      ,
      Then is | it like|ly thou | wilt un|dertake
          ,            ,          ,       ,           ,
75    A thing | like death | to chide | away | this shame,
             ,             ,          ,      2   ,           ,
      That copest | with death | himself | to escape | from it:
           ,          ,            ,          ,    ,
      And if | thou darst,| I'll give | thee re|medy.
 
JULIET
         ,         ,     ,    2        ,       ,
      O bid | me leap,| rather than | marry | Paris,
            ,         ,       ,         ,        ,
      From off | the bat|tlements | of yon|der tower;
           ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
80    Or walk | in thie|vish ways;| or bid | me lurk
             ,         ,      ,               ,        ,
      Where ser|pents are;| chain me | with roar|ing bears;
           ,         ,       ,       ,        ,
      Or shut | me night|ly in | a char|nel-house,
           ,         ,            ,            ,          ,
      Ore-co|vered quite | with dead | men's* rat|tling bones,
            ,        ,          ,        ,          ,
      With ree|ky shanks | and yel|low chap|less skulls;
          ,        ,    ,  2     T    T    T
85    Or bid | me go | into a | new-made grave
            ,         ,        ,     ,              ,
      And hide | me with | a dead | man in | his shroud;
         ,       2       ,           ,            ,         ,
      Things that to | hear them | told, have | made me | tremble;
          ,         ,            ,    ,         ,
      And I | will do | it with/out fear | or doubt,
           ,        ,    T      T   T     2         ,
      To live | an un|stained wife to | my sweet* love.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,              ,        ,        ,         ,
90    Hold then;| go home,| be mer|ry, give | consent
          ,      ,         ,    ,    2    ,
      To mar|ry Pa|ris: Wednes|day is to|morrow:
         ,        ,            ,          ,       ,
      Tomor|row night | look that | thou lie | alone;
           ,          ,      ,           ,    2        ,
      Let not | thy nurse | lie with | thee in thy | chamber:
             ,          ,     ,       ,        ,
      Take thou | this vi|al be|ing then | in bed,
            ,        ,       ,        ,           ,
95    And this | distil|led li|quor drink | thou off;
            ,       ,            ,          ,            ,
      When pre|sently | through all | thy veins | shall run
          ,          ,      ,             ,   ,
      A cold | and drow|sy hu|mor: for / no pulse
              ,         ,       ,          ,         ,
      Shall keep | his na|tive pro|gress, but | surcease:
            ,           ,            ,     ,          ,
      No warmth,| no breath | shall tes|tify | thou livst;
           ,      ,         ,           ,             ,
100   The ro|ses in | thy lips | and cheeks | shall fade
          ,     ,              ,    ,         ,
      To ma|ny ash|es, the / eyes' win|dows fall,
             ,           ,          ,        ,         ,
      Like^death | when he | shuts^up | the day | of life;
             ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      Each^part | deprived | of sup|ple gov|ernment,
              ,           ,           ,        ,           ,
      Shall stiff | and stark,| and cold | appear | like death:
           ,         ,          ,               ,     ,
105   And in | this bor|rowed like|ness of / shrunk death
             ,         ,      ,         ,       ,
      Thou shalt | contin|ue two | and for|ty hours,
            ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      And then | awake | as from | a plea|sant sleep.
            ,          ,     ,             ,         ,
      Now when | the bride|groom in | the mor|ning comes
           ,            ,         ,           ,           ,
      To rouse | thee from | thy bed,| there art | thou dead:
        ,            ,       ,         ,       ,
110   Then as | the man|ner of | our coun|try is,
                 ,    ,        ,        ,         ,
      In thy / best robes | unco|vered on | the bier
             ,          ,                 ,   ,         ,
      Thou shalt | be borne | to that / same an|cient vault
             ,         ,        ,        ,    2    ,
      Where all | the kin|dred of | the Cap|ulets lie.
                 ,    ,        ,            ,        ,
      In the / mean time | against | thou shalt | awake,
             ,  2   ,       ,         ,          ,
115   Shall Ro|meo by | my let|ters know | our drift,
           ,        ,          ,         ,       ,
      And hi|ther shall | he come:| and he | and I
             ,          ,        ,          ,      ,
      Will watch | thy wa|king, and | that ve|ry night
             ,  2    ,           ,         ,    ,
      Shall Ro|meo bear | thee hence | to Man|tua.
            ,            ,           ,          ,         ,
      And this | shall free | thee from | this pre|sent shame;
          ,      ,         ,         ,   2      ,
120   If no | incon|stant toy | nor wo|manish fear,
         ,         ,       ,        ,       ,
      Abate | thy va|lour in | the ac|ting it.
 
JULIET
        ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      Give me,| give me,| O tell | not me | of fear.
 
FRIAR LAURENCE
        ,              ,          ,          ,       ,
      Hold get | you gone,| be strong | and pro|sperous
           ,        ,            ,       ,    2       ,
      In this | resolve:| I'll send | a fri|ar with speed
          ,    ,       2    ,        ,         ,
125   To Man|tua,| with my let|ters to | thy lord.
 
JULIET
        ,               ,             ,               ,        ,
      Love give^|me strength,| and strength | shall help | afford.
            ,      ,   ,       .
      Farewell | dear fa/ther.     \\
 
[Exeunt]

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