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Romeo and Juliet

Act III, Scene 2

Capulet's orchard.
 
[Enter JULIET]
 
JULIET
       ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      Gallop | apace,| you fie|ry-foot|ed steeds,
                ,        ,          ,       ,    ,
      Towards Phoe|bus' lod|ging: such | a wa|goner
          ,     ,            ,         ,         ,
      As Pha|ethon | would whip | you to | the west,
            ,          ,       ,        ,   2   ,
      And bring | in clou|dy night | imme|diately.
         T    .     T    T          ,       ,         ,
5     Spread thy* close cur|tain, love-|perfor|ming night,
            ,     ,       ,          ,         , 2
      That run|away's | eyes may | wink and | Romeo
        ,               ,         ,               ,  ,
      Leap to | these^arms,| untalked | of and / unseen.
       ,            ,        ,          ,   2     ,
      Lovers | can see | to do | their am|orous rites
                  ,    ,         ,        ,         ,
      By their / own beau|ties; or | if love | be blind,
           ,       ,            ,       ,           ,
10    It best | agrees | with night.| Come ci|vil night,
            ,      ,       ,       ,         ,
      Thou so|ber-sui|ted ma|tron all | in black,
            ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      And learn | me how | to lose | a win|ning match,
         ,             ,         ,         ,       ,
      Played for | a pair | of stain|less mai|denhoods:
        ,            ,       ,    ,                 ,
      Hood my | unmanned | blood bat/ing in | my cheeks
                   ,    ,                 ,      ,           ,
15    With thy / black man|tle; till / strange love | grow bold,
              ,          ,      ,       ,     ,
      Think true | love^ac|ted sim|ple mod|esty.
             ,           ,   2    ,          ,         ,
      Come night,| come Ro|meo, come | thou day | in night;
            ,          ,      ,          ,          ,
      For thou | wilt lie | upon | the wings | of night
       ,             ,      ,          ,         ,
      Whiter | than new | snow on | a ra|ven's back.
        T    Tx     T             x       T      T     T
20    Come gentle night,| come^loving | black-browed night,
        ,           ,       ,          ,          ,
      Give me | my Ro|meo; and | when he | shall die,
        ,             ,         ,        ,        ,
      Take him | and cut | him out | in lit|tle stars,
           ,          ,          ,          x          ,
      And he | will make | the face | of heaven | so fine
            ,          ,           ,        ,           ,
      That all | the world | will be | in love | with night
           ,        ,    ,            ,       ,
25    And pay | no wor|ship to | the gar|ish sun.
         ,           ,          ,        ,       ,
      Oh I | have bought | the man|sion of | a love,
           ,         ,           ,           ,        ,
      But not | possessed | it, and | though I | am sold,
           ,        ,         ,   2    ,         ,
      Not yet | enjoyed:| so te|dious is | this day
          ,         ,         ,          ,     ,
      As is | the night | before | some fes|tival
       ,   2    ,          ,            T   T    T
30    To an im|patient | child that | hath new robes
           ,          ,          ,          ,          ,
      And may | not wear | them. O | here comes | my nurse,
       .   T     T     T         ,        ,             ,
      And she brings news;| and ev|ery tongue | that speaks
           ,   2     ,              x       ,     ,
      But Ro|meo's name | speaks heaven|ly el|oquence.
            ,            ,           ,           ,           ,
      Now nurse,| what news?| What hast | thou there?| The cords
            ,  2   ,           ,
35    That Ro|meo bid | thee fetch?
 
[Enter Nurse, with cords]
 
NURSE
                                         ,          ,
                                    Aye aye,| the cords.
 
[Throws them down]
 
JULIET
           ,          ,          ,           ,           ,
      Aye me,| what news?| Why dost | thou wring | thy hands?
 
NURSE
           ,      ,           ,           ,           ,
      Ah well-|a-day,| he's dead,| he's dead,| he's dead.
       ,           ,     ,         ,        ,
      We are | undone | lady,| we are | undone.
         ,         ,           ,            ,            ,
40    Alack | the day,| he's gone,| he's killed,| he's dead.
 
JULIET
           ,       ,       ,   2
      Can hea|ven be | so en|vious?
 
NURSE
                                     ,  2   ,
                                    Ro|meo can,
              ,     2    ,       ,  2    ,   ,
      Though hea|ven cannot:| O Ro|meo, Ro|meo,
          ,       ,             ,          ,   ,
      Who e|ver would | have thought | it Ro|meo.
 
JULIET
            ,      ,        2       ,         ,         ,
45    What de|vil art | thou that dost | torment | me thus?
            ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
      This tor|ture should | be roared | in dis|mal hell.
            ,  2    ,          ,          ,         ,
      Hath Ro|meo slain | himself?| Say thou | but aye,
                   ,   ,     ,          ,        ,
      And that / bare vow|el I | shall poi|son more
                   ,    ,        ,         ,     ,
      Than the / death-dar|ting eye | of cock|atrice:
      ,          ,        ,          ,        ,
50    I am | not I,| if there | be such | an aye;
           ,            ,           ,          ,       ,
      Or those | eyes^shut,| that make | thee an|swer aye.
          ,        ,          ,        ,         ,
      If he | be slain | say aye;| or if | not, no.
               ,        ,        ,        ,        ,
      Brief sounds | deter|mine of | my weal | or woe.
 
NURSE
         ,          ,        ,         ,           ,
      I saw | the wound,| I saw | it with | mine^eyes,
            ,          ,      ,            ,        ,
55    God save | the mark,| here on | his man|ly breast,
         ,         ,         ,      ,         ,
      A pit|eous corse,| a bloo|dy pit|eous corse;
        T     T   .  T       ,         ,          ,
      Pale, pale as ash|es, all | bedaubed | in blood,
                 ,    ,         ,       ,         ,
      All in / gore-blood;| I swoon|ed at | the sight.
 
JULIET
          ,          ,            ,         ,          ,
      O break | my heart,| poor bank|rupt break | at once,
          ,        ,           ,        ,     ,
60    To pri|son eyes,| nere look | on lib|erty.
             ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      Vile^earth | to earth | resign;| end^mo|tion here;
            ,         ,  2    ,          ,       ,
      And thou | and Ro|meo press | one hea|vy bier.
 
NURSE
         ,        ,               ,     ,        ,
      O Ty|balt, Ty|balt, the / best friend | I had:
          ,    2    ,       ,       ,      ,
      O cour|teous Ty|balt hon|est gen|tleman,
           ,     ,            ,        ,           ,
65    That e|ver I | should live | to see | thee dead.
 
JULIET
             ,          ,           ,       2    ,      o
      What storm | is this | that blows | so contra|ry?
          ,  2     ,           ,        ,        ,
      Is Ro|meo slaugh|tered, and | is Ty|balt dead?
           ,     ,    ,                  ,       ,
      My dear-|loved cou/sin, and | my dear|er lord?
             ,         ,        ,          ,    2    ,
      Then dread|ful trum|pet sound | the gen|eral doom,
           ,        ,        ,          ,          ,
70    For who | is li|ving, if | those two | are gone?
 
NURSE
       ,            ,         ,  2   ,      ,
      Tybalt | is gone,| and Ro|meo ban|ished;
       , 2            ,           ,       ,      ,
      Romeo | that killed | him, he | is ban|ished.
 
JULIET
         ,         ,   2     ,          ,          ,
      O God!| did Ro|meo's hand | shed Ty|balt's blood?
 
NURSE
          ,        ,      ,         ,        ,
      It did,| it did;| alas | the day,| it did.
 
JULIET
         ,         ,      ,            ,     2     ,
75    O ser|pent heart,| hid with | a flo|wering face.
          ,      ,        ,         ,        ,
      Did e|ver dra|gon keep | so fair | a cave?
        ,         ,         ,        ,    ,
      Beauti|ful ty|rant, fiend | ange|lical:
        T     Tx      T       ,        ,   2      ,
      Dove-feathered ra|ven, wol|vish-ra|vening lamb,
          ,      ,          ,      ,        ,
      Despi|sed sub|stance of | divi|nest show:
            ,     ,         ,           ,        ,
80    Just^op|posite | to what | thou just|ly seemst,
           ,       ,          ,    ,       ,
      A damned | saint, an | hono|rable | villain:
         ,         ,            ,        ,        ,
      O na|ture! What | hadst thou | to do | in hell,
             ,            ,          ,       ,       ,
      When thou | didst bower | the spi|rit of | a fiend
          ,      ,     ,                ,     ,
      In mo|ral par|adise | of such / sweet flesh?
          ,       ,        ,                ,     x
85    Was e|ver book | contai|ning such / vile matter
           ,       ,     ,            ,             ,
      So fair|ly bound?| O that | deceit | should dwell
           ,       ,         ,
      In such | a gor|geous pa|lace.
 
NURSE
                                       ,           ,
                                    There's | no trust,
           ,         ,     ,       ,         ,         ->
      No faith,| no hon|esty | in men;| all per||jured,
       ,         ,           ,       ,       ,
90    All | forsworn,| all naught,| all dis|semblers.
            ,          ,      ,            ,    2   ,
      Ah where's | my man?| Give me | some a|qua vitae:
               ,             ,           ,         ,        ,
      These griefs,| these woes,| these sor|rows make | me old.
        ,              ,  2
      Shame come | to Ro|meo.
 
JULIET
                                ,         ,          ,
                              Blis|tered be | thy tongue
            ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
95    For such | a wish,| he was | not born | to shame:
        ,          ,      ,            ,         ,
      Upon | his brow | shame is | ashamed | to sit;
            ,         ,            ,      ,          ,
      For 'tis | a throne | where hon|or may | be crowned
        ,   ,                 ,   ,        ,
      Sole mon/arch of | the un|iver|sal earth.
          ,        ,         ,        ,      ,
      O what | a beast | was I | to chide | him.
 
NURSE
      <-          ,           ,        ,            ,           ,
100      Will || you speak^|well of | him that | killed your | cousin?
 
JULIET
        ,    2         ,        ,          ,       ,
      Shall I speak | ill of | him that | is my | husband?
           ,         ,            ,              ,           ,
      Ah poor | my lord,| what tongue | shall smooth | thy name,
           ,         ,            ,          ,        ,
      When I | thy three-|hours^wife | have man|gled it.
            ,         ,         ,            ,          x
      But where|fore vil|lain didst | thou kill | my cousin?
            ,          x       ,             ,         ,
105   That vil|lain cousin | would have | killed my | husband:
        T     Tx     T       ,             ,         ,
      Back foolish tears,| back to | your na|tive spring;
            ,     ,      ,         ,        ,
      Your tri|buta|ry drops | belong | to woe,
             ,        ,       ,      ,       ,
      Which you | mista|king of|fer up | to joy.
          ,         ,           ,        ,            ,
      My hus|band lives | that Ty|balt would | have slain;
           ,        ,           ,            ,         ,        ->
110   And Ty|balt dead | that would | have slain | my hus||band:
       ,        2    ,          ,          ,        ,
      All | this is com|fort; where|fore weep | I then?
             ,           ,     ,             ,          ,
      Some word | there was,| worser | than Ty|balt's death,
            ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      That mur|dered me:| I would | forget | it fain;
           ,        ,       ,       ,    ,
      But oh,| it pres|ses to | my me|mory,
            ,        ,       ,         ,          ,
115   Like dam|ned guil|ty deeds | to sin|ners' minds:
       ,            ,         ,   ,    ,
      Tybalt | is dead,| and Ro|meo | banished;
            ,                 ,    ,     ,    __
      That ban|ished, that / one word | bani|shed,
             ,           ,        ,         ,          ,
      Hath slain | ten thou|sand Ty|balts. Ty|balt's death
           ,       ,         ,        ,       ,
      Was woe | enough | if it | had en|ded there:
                ,   ,         ,         ,       ,
120   Or if / sour woe | delights | in fel|lowship
            ,       ,          ,          ,         ,
      And need|ly will | be ranked | with o|ther griefs,
           ,         ,          ,          ,          ,
      Why fol|lowed not | when she | said Ty|balt's dead,
           ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      Thy fa|ther or | thy mo|ther, nay | or both,
             ,       ,     ,         ,            ,
      Which mod|ern la|menta|tions might | have moved?
            ,        ,        ,    2     ,          ,
125   But with | a rear|ward fol|lowing Ty|balt's death,
       , 2        ,      ,        ,            ,
      Romeo | is ban|ished | to speak | that word,
          ,        ,        ,        ,  2    ,     , ->
      Is fa|ther, mo|ther, Ty|balt, Ro|meo, Ju||liet,
            ,           ,     , 3 3      ,
      All slain,| all dead.| Romeo is | banished,
             ,       ,        ,       ,          ,
      There is | no end,| no lim|it, mea|sure, bound,
                  ,      ,          ,           ,          ,
130   In that / word's death;| no words | can that | woe sound.
        ,            ,       ,        ,         ,
      Where is | my fa|ther and | my mo|ther, nurse?
 
NURSE
       ,             ,       ,      ,          ,
      Weeping | and wai|ling o|ver Ty|balt's corse:
        ,         ,   2       ,          ,          ,
      Will you | go to them?| I will | bring you | thither.
 
JULIET
        ,               ,             ,       ,               ,
      Wash they | his wounds | with tears:| mine shall | be spent
              ,          ,         ,  2     ,       ,
135   When theirs | are dry | for Ro|meo's ban|ishment.
            ,           ,            ,          ,         ,
      Take^up | those cords:| poor^ropes,| you are | beguiled,
        T   T   .  T        ,  3 3    ,  __
      Both you and I;| for Ro|meo is ex|iled:
           ,         ,        ,       ,       ,
      He made | you for | a high|way to | my bed;
          ,       ,         ,       ,
      But I | a maid,| die mai|den-wid|owed.
      <-  ,       T      T    T       ,           ,        ,
140     Come || cords, come nurse;| I'll to | my wed|ding-bed;
            ,          ,  2     ,        ,       ,
      And death | not Ro|meo, take | my mai|denhead.
 
NURSE
       ,              ,         ,          ,   ,
      Hie to | your cham|ber: I'll | find Ro|meo
          ,        ,       ,      ,              ,
      To com|fort you:| I wot | well where | he is.
        ,             ,  2    ,         ,         ,
      Hark ye | your Ro|meo will | be here | at night:
            ,         ,       ,        ,           ,
145   I'll to | him; he | is hid | at Lau|rence' cell.
 
JULIET
          ,           ,           ,              ,     ,
      O find | him, give | this ring | to my / true knight,
           ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
      And bid | him come,| to take | his last | farewell.
 
[Exeunt]

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