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Romeo and Juliet

Act II, Scene 2

Capulet's orchard.
 
ROMEO
           ,          ,           ,       ,        ,
      He jests | at scars | that ne|ver felt | a wound.
            ,           ,              ,       ,         ,
      But soft,| what light | through yon|der win|dow breaks?
       ,            ,         ,   ,      2     ,
      It is | the east,| and Ju|liet | is the sun.
         ,           ,          ,         ,   2     ,
      Arise | fair* sun | and kill | the en|vious moon,
           ,      ,       ,          ,           ,
5     Who is | alrea|dy sick | and pale | with grief,
             ,          ,         ,           ,          ,
      That thou | her maid | art far | more fair | than she:
          ,          ,           ,        ,    ,
      Be not | her maid | since she | is en|vious;
           ,       ,   2   ,         ,          ,
      Her ves|tal li|very is | but sick | and green
            ,          ,          ,          ,        ,
      And none | but fools | do wear | it, cast | it off:
       ,   2      ,     ,       ,       __    ,              ,          ,
10    It is my | lady,| O it | is my | love,| O that | she knew | she were,  ????
             ,                 ,   ,          ,         ,
      She speaks | yet she / says no|thing: what | of that?
           ,         ,       ,         ,       ,
      Her eye | discour|ses; I | will an|swer it.
      ,            ,          ,        ,          ,
      I am | too bold | 'tis not | to me | she speaks:
       ,             ,        ,         ,           x
      Two of | the fair|est stars | in all | the heaven,
       ,             ,         ,       ,           ,
15    Having | some bus|iness do | entreat | her eyes
           ,       ,            ,             ,        ,
      To twin|kle in | their spheres | till they | return.
        ,             ,           ,       ,             ,
      What if | her eyes | were there,| they in | her head,
             ,         ,         ,             ,             ,
      The bright|ness of | her cheek | would shame | those stars,
          ,          ,        ,         ,          x
      As day|light doth | a lamp;| her eye | in heaven
               ,           ,     ,         ,          ,
20    Would through | the air|y re|gion stream | so bright
             ,             ,          ,          ,          ,
      That birds | would sing | and think | it were | not night.
       ,              ,           ,       ,          ,
      See how | she leans | her cheek | upon | her hand.
      ,            ,        ,       ,           ,
      O that | I were | a glove | upon | that hand,
           ,           ,            ,
      That I | might touch | that cheek.
 
JULIET
                                              ,
                                         Aye me.
 
ROMEO
                                                       ,
                                                She speaks.
          ,        ,       ,    ,                  ,
25    O speak | again | bright an/gel, for | thou art
          ,    2    ,          ,       2    ,         ,
      As glo|rious to | this night | being ore | my head,
          ,       ,      ,      ,          x
      As is | a wing|ed mes|senger | of heaven
       ,  2        T    T   T      ,           ,
      Unto the | white upturned | wonder|ing eyes
          ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      Of mor|tals that | fall back | to gaze | on him
            ,        ,           ,     ,          ,
30    When he | bestrides | the la|zy puf|fing clouds
            ,       ,         ,      ,        ,
      And sails | upon | the bo|som of | the air.
 
JULIET
         ,  2    ,  2     ,         ,          ,   2   o ->
      O Ro|meo, Ro|meo, where|fore art | thou Ro||meo?
         ,        ,     3   3    ,          ,
      Deny | thy fa|ther and refuse | thy name;
          ,                ,    ,         ,          ,
      Or if | thou wilt / not, be | but sworn | my love,
            ,        ,       ,      ,    ,
35    And I'll | no lon|ger be | a Cap|ulet.
 
ROMEO [Aside]
            ,          ,         ,         ,          ,
      Shall I | hear more,| or shall | I speak | at this?
 
JULIET
            ,          ,          ,       ,   ,
      'Tis but | thy name | that is | my en|emy;
            ,         ,            ,       ,     ,
      Thou art | thyself,| though not | a Mon|tague.
              ,     ,     ,            ,          ,
      What's^Mon|tague?| It is | nor hand | nor foot,
           ,          ,        ,    ,        ,
40    Nor arm,| nor face,| nor a|ny o|ther part
          ,       ,      ,       ,        ,        ,
      Belong|ing to | a man.| O be | some^o|ther name.
        ,             ,      ,               ,        ,
      What's in | a name?| That which | we call | a rose
         ,    ,        ,            ,          ,
      By a|ny o|ther name | would smell | as sweet;
          ,  2    ,           ,        ,  2     ,
      So Ro|meo would,| were he | not Ro|meo called,
          ,           ,        ,         ,          ,
45    Retain | that dear | perfec|tion which | he owes
           ,          ,       ,  2     ,          ,
      Without | that ti|tle. Ro|meo, doff | thy name,
           ,           ,           ,        ,         ,
      And for | that name | which is | no part | of thee
            ,        ,
      Take all | myself.
 
ROMEO
                             ,          ,         ,
                         I take | thee at | thy word:
        ,    2        ,           ,        T   T   T
50    Call me but | love, and | I'll be | new baptized;
             ,        ,       ,        ,   ,
      Henceforth | I ne|ver will | be Ro|meo.
 
JULIET
            ,          ,           ,          ,            ,
      What man | art thou | that thus | bescreened | in night
           ,         ,        ,
      So stum|blest on | my coun|sel?
 
ROMEO
                                      ,       ,
                                     By | a name
          ,         ,         ,          ,       ,
55    I know | not how | to tell | thee who | I am:
           ,           ,          ,       ,       ,
      My name | dear saint,| is hate|ful to | myself,
          ,         ,       ,   ,        ,
      Because | it is | an en|emy | to thee;
          ,        ,       ,           ,          ,
      Had I | it writ|ten, I | would tear | the word.
 
JULIET
           ,          ,          ,        ,         ,
      My ears | have not | yet drunk | a hun|dred words
                   ,      ,    2     ,        ,          ,
60    Of that / tongue's ut|tering, yet | I know | the sound:
            ,         ,   ,      2   ,     ,
      Art thou | not Ro|meo | and a Mon|tague?
 
ROMEO
       ,          T    T    .  T        ,         ,
      Neither | fair maid, if^ei|ther thee | dislike.
 
JULIET
            ,           ,         ,                ,    ,
      How camst | thou hi|ther, tell | me, and / wherefore?
           ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      The or|chard walls | are high | and hard | to climb,
                  ,     ,         ,    2    ,          ,
65    And the / place death,| consid|ering who | thou art,
         ,     ,       ,         ,           ,
      If a|ny of | my kin|smen find | thee here.
 
ROMEO
              ,             ,         ,         ,             ,
      With love's | light^wings | did I | ore-perch | these walls;
           ,      ,       ,        ,          ,
      For sto|ny lim|its can|not hold | love^out,
       ,           ,         ,           T     T  .   T
      And what | love can | do, that | dares love attempt;
        ,              ,        ,        ,        ,
70    Therefore | thy kin|smen are | no let | to me.
 
JULIET
           ,        ,            ,          ,        ,
      If they | do see | thee, they | will mur|der thee.
 
ROMEO
         ,            ,      ,   ,                 ,
      Alack | there lies | more per/il in | thine^eye
             ,      ,            ,            ,          ,
      Than twen|ty of | their swords:| look thou | but sweet,
          ,        ,         ,            ,    ,
      And I | am proof | against | their en|mity.
 
JULIET
          ,          ,          ,           ,           ,
75    I would | not for | the world | they saw | thee here.
 
ROMEO
      .   T     T      T          ,         ,            ,
      I have night's cloak | to hide | me from | their sight;
           ,           ,         ,           ,         ,
      And but | thou love | me, let | them find | me here:
           ,          ,       ,      ,           ,
      My life | were bet|ter en|ded by | their hate,
             ,         ,       ,        ,         ,
      Than death | prorog|ued wan|ting of | thy love.
 
JULIET
           ,        ,          ,            ,           ,
80    By whose | direc|tion foundst | thou out | this place?
 
ROMEO
           ,           ,            ,         ,       ,
      By love | that first | did prompt | me to | inquire;
       ,             ,            ,   ,          ,
      He lent | me coun|sel and / I lent | him eyes.
      ,          ,       ,           ,        ,
      I am | no pil|ot; yet | wert thou | as far
                  ,    ,        ,               ,         ,
      As that / vast shore | washed with | the far|thest sea,
          ,        ,        ,      ,   ,
85    I would | adven|ture for | such mer/chandise.
 
JULIET
              ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      Thou knowst | the mask | of night | is on | my face,
        ,             ,        ,         ,          ,
      Else would | a mai|den blush | bepaint | my cheek
            ,            ,           ,          ,         ,
      For that | which thou | hast heard | me speak | tonight
        ,              ,          ,      T     T   . T
      Fain would | I dwell | on form,| fain, fain deny
           ,          ,           ,        ,       ,
90    What I | have spoke:| but fare|well com|pliment,
        ,           ,           ,           ,         ,
      Dost thou | love me?| I know | thou wilt | say aye,
          ,          ,          ,         ,           ,
      And I | will take | thy word:| yet if | thou swearst,
             ,             ,         ,        ,      ,
      Thou mayst | prove false;| at lo|vers' per|juries
                   ,     ,        ,       ,   ,
      They say / Jove laughs.| O gen|tle Ro|meo,
           ,           ,          ,          ,       ,
95    If thou | dost love,| pronounce | it faith|fully:
          ,           ,         ,         ,       ,
      Or if | thou thinkst | I am | too quick|ly won,
             ,          ,        ,          ,          ,
      I'll frown | and be | perverse | and say | thee nay,
           ,          ,          ,     ,              ,
      So thou | wilt woo;| but else | not for | the world.
           ,           ,     ,       ,         ,
      In truth | fair Mon|tague | I am | too fond,
            ,          ,            ,       2   ,        ,
100   And there|fore thou | mayst^think | my beha|vior light:
            ,         ,      ,           ,            ,
      But trust | me gen|tleman,| I'll prove | more true
             ,            ,          ,        ,         ,
      Than those | that have | more cun|ning to | be strange.
           ,            ,             ,         ,          ,
      I should | have been | more* strange,| I must | confess,
            ,         ,       ,          ,         ,
      But that | thou o|verheardst,| ere I | was ware,
           ,       ,    ,                ,   ,
105   My true | love's pas/sion: there|fore par/don me,
           ,        ,           ,              ,     ,
      And not | impute | this yiel|ding to / light love,
                    ,    ,           ,       ,     ,
      Which the / dark night | hath so | disco|vered.
 
ROMEO
       ,         ,        ,        ,       ,
      Lady,| by yon|der bles|sed moon | I vow
             ,            x      ,            T     T    T
      That tips | with silver | all these | fruit-tree tops--
 
JULIET
          ,          ,         ,       2   ,          ,
110   O swear | not by | the moon,| the incon|stant moon,
             ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      That month|ly chan|ges in | her cir|cled orb,
             ,          ,            ,        ,   2 ,
      Lest that | thy love | prove like|wise var|iable.
 
ROMEO
             ,         ,
      What shall | I swear | by?
 
JULIET
                                  ,         ,         ,
                                 Do | not swear | at all;
          ,          ,      ,             ,          ,
115   Or if | thou wilt | swear by | thy gra|cious self,
        ,             ,        ,     ,    ,
      Which is | the god | of my | ido|latry,
            ,        ,       ,
      And I'll | believe | thee.
 
ROMEO
                                   2        T      T    T
                                 If my | heart's dear love--
 
JULIET
            ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      Well do | not swear,| although | I joy | in thee:
          ,        ,               ,   ,         ,
120   I have | no joy | of this / contract | tonight:
        2    ,      ,          ,     ,           ,
      It is too | rash, too | unad|vised, too | sudden;
            ,          ,          ,            ,         ,
      Too like | the light|ning which | doth cease | to be
           ,         ,         ,          ,            ,
      Ere one | can say,| it light|ens. Sweet | good night:
            ,         ,        ,         ,   2       ,
      This bud | of love | by sum|mer's ri|pening breath,
            ,         ,    2      ,            ,         ,
125   May prove | a beau|teous flower | when next | we meet.
             ,            ,          ,         ,          ,
      Good night,| good night,| as sweet | repose | and rest
        ,             ,          ,        ,          ,
      Come to | thy heart | as that | within | my breast.
 
ROMEO
          ,           ,         ,      ,      ,
      O wilt | thou leave | me so | unsa|tisfied?
 
JULIET
            ,     ,         ,            ,        ,
      What sa|tisfac|tion canst | thou have | tonight?
 
ROMEO
         2     ,         ,             ,        ,          ,
130   The exchange | of thy | love's^faith|ful vow | for mine.
 
JULIET
          ,           ,        ,           ,            x
      I gave | thee mine | before | thou didst | request it:
           ,        ,          ,         ,       ,
      And yet | I would | it were | to give | again.
 
ROMEO
                ,          ,         ,          ,         ,
      Wouldst thou | withdraw | it? For | what pur|pose love?
 
JULIET
           ,        ,           ,         ,       ,
      But to | be frank | and give | it thee | again.
           ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
135   And yet | I wish | but for | the thing | I have:
           ,      ,        ,         ,        ,
      My boun|ty is | as bound|less as | the sea,
           ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      My love | as deep,| the more | I give | to thee
            ,        ,          ,         ,     ,
      The more | I have,| for both | are in|finite.
 
[Nurse calls within]
          ,           ,         ,           ,       ,
      I hear | some noise | within | dear love | adieu:
        ,           ,              ,     ,         ,
140   Anon | good nurse, | sweet* Mon|tague | be true:
        ,           ,       ,          ,       ,
      Stay but | a lit|tle, I | will come | again.
 
[Exit, above]
 
ROMEO
          ,        ,        ,        ,      ,
      O bles|sed bles|sed night,| I am | afeard
       ,           ,           ,        ,        ,
      Being | in night,| all this | is but | a dream,
            ,    2      ,         ,        ,        o
      Too flat|tering sweet | to be | substan|tial.
 
[Re-enter JULIET, above]
 
JULIET
        T     T     T     , 2       2       ,         ,
145   Three words dear | Romeo,| and good night | indeed.
           ,          ,         ,        ,    2  ,
      If that | thy bent | of love | be hon|ourable,
           ,        ,           ,         ,       ,      2->
      Thy pur|pose mar|riage, send | me word | tomor||row,
          ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      By one | that I'll | procure | to come | to thee,
        ,                ,           ,         ,          ,
      Where and | what time | thou wilt | perform | the rite;
           ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
150   And all | my for|tunes at | thy foot | I'll lay
           ,        ,         ,            ,          ,
      And fol|low thee | my lord | throughout | the world.
 
Nurse [Within]
       ,
      Madam.
 
JULIET
                ,      ,         ,           ,            ,  ->
            I come,| anon:| But if | thou meanst || not well,
         ,       ,
      I do | beseech | thee--
 
Nurse [Within]
                               ,
                              Ma|dam.
 
JULIET
      <-  ,         ,       ,
        (By || and by | I come)
                                     ,           ,
155                             To cease | thy suit,
      <-      ,          ,        ,
        And leave || me to | my grief:
                                          ,        ,        ,
                                       Tomor|row will | I send.
 
ROMEO
            ,          ,
      So thrive | my soul.
 
JULIET
                               ,         ,            ,
                           A thou|sand times | good night.
 
[Exit, above]
 
ROMEO
          ,         ,           ,          ,          ,
160   A thou|sand times | the worse | to want | thy light.
        T    T     T       ,           ,          ,           ___
      Love goes toward | love, as | schoolboys^|from their | books,
            ,      T    T      T        ,           ,       ___
      But love | from love, toward | school with | heavy | looks.  (hex with prev)
 
[Retiring. Re-enter JULIET, above]
 
JULIET
            ,       ,    ,          ,    2       ,
      Hist Ro|meo hist:| O for | a fal|coner's voice,
           ,          ,       ,        ,       ,
      To lure | this tas|sel gen|tle back | again,
       ,              ,          ,          ,        ,
165   Bondage | is hoarse,| and may | not speak | aloud;
        ,              ,          ,          ,       ,
      Else would | I tear | the cave | where E|cho lies,
            ,         ,       ,             ,            ,
      And make | her ai|ry tongue | more hoarse | than mine,
            ,    ,       ,       ,   2     ,
      With re|peti|tion of | my Ro|meo's^name.
 
ROMEO
          ,        ,           ,       ,         ,
      It is | my soul | that calls | upon | my name:
           ,        ,            ,          ,           ,
170   How sil|ver-sweet | sound^lo|vers' tongues | by night,
            ,        ,      ,      ,         ,
      Like sof|test mu|sic to | atten|ding ears.
 
JULIET
       , 2
      Romeo.
 
ROMEO
                 ,
            My dear.
 
JULIET
                      ,       ,       ,
                    What o'|clock to|morrow
        ,         ,         ,
      Shall I | send to | thee?
 
ROMEO
                                          ,         ,
175                            At | the hour | of nine.
 
JULIET
          ,          ,           ,       ,            ,
      I will | not fail:| 'tis twen|ty years | till then.
          ,        ,        ,         ,           ,
      I have | forgot | why I | did call | thee back.
 
ROMEO
                 ,     ,           ,       ,       ,
      Let me / stand here | till thou | remem|ber it.
 
JULIET
          ,         ,         ,           ,       ,
      I shall | forget,| to have | thee still | stand there,
         ,     2    ,        ,         ,     ,
180   Remem|bering how | I love | thy com|pany.
 
ROMEO
       .    T    T     T         ,           ,         ,
      And I'll still stay,| to have | thee still | forget,
          ,       ,    ,        ,          ,
      Forget|ting a|ny o|ther home | but this.
 
JULIET
            ,       ,        ,           ,           ,
      'Tis al|most mor|ning; I | would have | thee gone:
           ,        ,         ,       ,          ,
      And yet | no fur|ther than | a wan|ton's bird;
            ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
185   Who lets | it hop | a lit|tle from | her hand,
        T  .   T   T     ,      2      ,        ,
      Like a poor pri|soner | in his twis|ted gyves,
       ,      2      T     T      T          ,       ,
      And with a | silk thread plucks | it back | again,
          ,       ,        ,        ,     ,
      So lo|ving-jea|lous of | his lib|erty.
 
ROMEO
          ,         ,          ,
      I would | I were | thy bird.
 
JULIET
                                    ,              ,
190                               Sweet so | would I:
          ,            ,                  ,   ,       ,
      Yet I | should kill | thee with / much che|rishing.
             ,            ,      ,     2       T    T    T      o
      Good night,| good night.| Parting is | such sweet sor|row,
           ,          ,           ,           ,       ,       o
      That I | shall say | good night | till it | be mor|row.   (hex with prev)
 
[Exit above]
 
ROMEO
              ,       ,            ,      ,               ,
      Sleep^dwell | upon | thine^eyes,| peace in | thy breast.
            ,          ,           ,          ,          ,
195   Would I | were sleep | and peace | so sweet | to rest,
              ,       ,        ,       ,          ,
      Hence^will | I to | my ghost|ly fa|ther's cell,
            ,         ,                ,   ,         ,
      His help | to crave,| and my / dear hap | to tell.
 
[Exit]

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