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Romeo and Juliet

Act I, Scene 4

A street.
 
[Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six Maskers, Torch-bearers, and others]
 
ROMEO
        ,                  ,          ,          ,        ,
      What shall | this speech | be spoke | for our | excuse?
           ,         ,        ,      ,    ,
      Or shall | we on | without | apol|ogy?
 
BENVOLIO
            ,        ,         ,        ,    ,
      The date | is out | of such | prolix|ity:
              ,        ,       ,     ,              ,
      We'll have | no Cu|pid hood|winked with | a scarf,
        ,          ,          ,       ,         ,
5     Bearing | a Tar|tar's pain|ted bow | of lath,
        ,            ,        ,        ,    ,
      Scaring | the la|dies like | a crow-|keeper;
           ,         ,     T   T   T       ,          ,  ->
      Nor not | without-|book prologue | faintly || spoke
       ,             ,         ,         ,
      Af/ter the | prompter,| for our | entrance:
           ,          ,        ,        ,           ,
      But let | them mea|sure us | by what | they will;
             ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
10    We'll mea|sure them | a mea|sure, and | be gone.
 
ROMEO
        ,           ,     ,       ,     2        ,
      Give me | a torch:| I am | not for this | ambling;
       ,           ,      ,          ,          ,
      Being | but hea|vy, I | will bear | the light.
 
MERCUTIO
       ,           ,  2    ,          ,          ,
      Nay gen|tle Ro|meo, we | must have | you dance.
 
ROMEO
          ,       ,          ,          ,         ,
      Not I | believe | me: you | have dan|cing shoes
            ,        ,     ,            ,         ,
15    With nim|ble soles:| I have | a soul | of lead
            ,         ,          ,        ,        ,
      So stakes | me to | the ground | I can|not move.
 
MERCUTIO
       ,           ,       ,       ,         ,
      You are | a lo|ver; bor|row Cu|pid's wings,
            ,           ,       ,       ,        ,
      And soar | with them | above | a com|mon bound.
 
ROMEO
              ,    ,        ,        ,          ,
      I am | too sore | enpier|ced with | his shaft
           ,                 ,    ,                ,   ,
20    To soar | with his / light fea|thers, and / so bound,
       2    ,      ,         ,       T    T   T
      I cannot|  bound a | pitch a|bove dull woe:
       ,              ,      ,       ,       ,
      Under | love's^hea|vy bur|den do | I sink.
 
MERCUTIO
           ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      And to | sink^in | it should | you bur|den love;
            ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      Too great | oppres|sion for | a ten|der thing.
 
ROMEO
           ,       ,        ,              ,    ,
25    Is love | a ten|der thing?| It is / too rough,
            ,          ,     2     ,          ,            ,
      Too rude,| too bois|terous, and | it pricks | like thorn.
 
MERCUTIO
           ,         ,           ,         ,            ,
      If love | be rough | with you,| be rough | with love;
              ,          ,       2     ,      T    T    T
      Prick^love | for prick|ing, and you | beat love down.
        ,           ,        ,        ,       ,
      Give me | a case | to put | my vis|age in:
         ,      ,       ,        ,         ,
30    A vi|sor for | a vi|sor, what | care^I
            ,    2   ,           ,        ,      ,
      What cur|ious eye | doth quote | defor|mities?
        ,             ,        ,             ,          ,
      Here are | the bee|tle brows | shall blush | for me.
 
BENVOLIO
             ,          ,       ,        ,       ,
      Come knock | and en|ter; and | no soo|ner in,
           ,      ,        ,         ,         ,
      But ev|ery man | betake | him to | his legs.
 
ROMEO
          ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
35    A torch | for me:| let wan|tons light | of heart
       ,             ,          ,       ,            ,
      Tickle | the sense|less rush|es with | their heels,
          ,       ,           ,    .   T    T     T
      For I | am pro|verbed with | a grandsire phrase;
        ,          ,       ,              ,   ,
      I'll be | a can|dle-hol|der and / look on.
            ,          ,         ,        ,        ,
      The game | was nere | so fair,| and I | am done.
 
MERCUTIO
            ,           ,          ,              ,    ,
40    Tut dun's | the mouse,| the con|stable's / own word:
           ,         ,            ,           ,          ,
      If thou | art dun,| we'll draw | thee from | the mire
                 ,   ,    2      ,          ,           ,
      Of this / sir-rev|erence love,| wherein | thou stickst
       ,            ,      ,             ,         ,
      Up to | the ears.| Come we | burn^day|light ho.
 
ROMEO
            ,           ,
      Nay that's | not so.
 
MERCUTIO
                               ,         ,      ,
45                         I mean | sir in | delay
           ,            ,          ,           ,         ,
      We waste | our lights | in vain,| like lamps | by day.
        ,          ,    ,                   ,         ,
      Take our | good mean/ing, for | our judg|ment sits
        ,              ,          ,               ,    ,
      Five times^|in that | ere once | in our / five wits.
 
ROMEO
           ,          ,        ,      ,           ,
      And we | mean well | in go|ing to | this masque;
            ,        ,        ,
50    But 'tis | no wit | to go.
 
MERCUTIO
                                  ,             ,
                                 Why may | one ask?
 
ROMEO
           ,          ,         ,
      I dreamed | a dream | tonight.
 
MERCUTIO
                                         ,       ,
                                    And so | did I.
 
ROMEO
             ,          ,
      Well what | was yours?
 
MERCUTIO
                                    ,        ,      ,
55                           That drea|mers of|ten lie.
 
ROMEO
          ,       ,             ,         ,              ,
      In bed | asleep,| while they | do dream | things^true.
 
MERCUTIO
      ,     2     T    T    T           ,          ,
      O then I | see Queen Mab | hath been | with you.
       ,             ,        ,    ,               ,
      She is | the fair|ies' mid|wife, and | she comes
           ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      In shape | no big|ger than | an a|gate-stone
                 ,   ,       ,       ,     ,
60    On the / fore-fin|ger of | an al|derman,
        ,              ,        ,      ,     ,
      Drawn with | a team | of lit|tle a|tomies
          ,            ,      ,         ,       ,
      Athwart | men's^no|ses as | they lie | asleep;
           ,        ,                 ,   ,          ,
      Her wa|gon-spokes | made of / long spi|ders' legs,
           ,      ,         ,          ,    ,
      The co|ver of | the wings | of grass|hoppers,
           ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
65    The tra|ces of | the smal|lest spi|der's web,
           ,        ,         ,           ,   2    ,
      The col|lars of | the moon|shine's^wat|ery beams,
            ,        ,           ,          ,         ,
      Her whip | of cri|cket's bone,| the lash | of film,
           ,    ,        ,       T    T  .   T
      Her wa|goner | a small | grey-coated gnat,
       ,        ,           ,      ,        __
      Not so | big as | a round | little | worm
         ,                ,     ,       ,       ,
70    Pricked from | the la|zy fin|ger of | a maid;
            ,    ,     2    ,      ,      ,
      Her char|iot | is an emp|ty ha|zel-nut
        ,            ,        ,             ,    ,
      Made by | the joi|ner squir|rel or / old grub,
        ,             ,          ,         ,    ,
      Time out | of mind | the fair|ies' coach|makers.
           ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      And in | this state | she gal|lops night | by night
               ,          ,           ,           ,          ,
75    Through lo|vers' brains,| and then | they dream | of love;
            ,           ,            ,          ,           ,
      Ore cour|tiers' knees,| that dream | on curt|sies straight,
           ,         ,                  ,      ,          ,
      Ore law|yers' fin|gers, who / straight dream | on fees,
           ,         ,            ,          ,        ,
      Ore la|dies' lips,| who straight | on kis|ses dream,
             ,         ,      ,           ,          ,
      Which oft | the an|gry Mab | with blis|ters plagues,
          ,              ,             ,           ,       ,
80    Because | their breaths | with sweet|meats^tain|ted are:
            ,         ,        ,        ,    2      ,
      Sometime | she gal|lops ore | a cour|tier's nose,
            ,            ,        ,        ,        ,
      And then | dreams^he | of smel|ling out | a suit;
            ,         ,      ,      2      T    T      T
      And some|time comes | she with a | tithe-pig's tail
        ,           ,          ,      2     ,        ,
      Tickling | a par|son's nose | as he lies | asleep,
              ,         ,     ,       ,     ,
85    Then dreams | he of | ano|ther ben|efice:
        ,             ,        ,       ,           ,
      Sometime | she dri|veth ore | a sol|dier's neck,
            ,            ,       ,        ,          ,
      And then / dreams^he | of cut|ting for|eign throats,
           ,         ,    ,         ,          ,
      Of brea|ches, am|busca|does, Spa|nish blades,
            ,            ,        ,          ,      ,
      Of healths | five^fa|thom deep;| and then | anon
        ,             ,         ,           ,           ,
90    Drums in | his ear,| at which | he starts | and wakes,
       ,    2            ,          ,          ,         ,
      And being | thus frigh|ted swears | a prayer | or two
             ,        ,          ,         ,     ,
      And sleeps | again.| This is | that ve|ry Mab
             ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      That plats | the manes | of hor|ses in | the night,
            ,          ,    ,          T     Tx      T
      And bakes | the elf|locks in | foul sluttish hairs,
              ,       ,          ,        ,         ,
95    Which once | untan|gled, much | misfor|tune bodes:
        ,            ,           ,      ,               ,
      This is | the hag,| when maids | lie on | their backs,
             ,        ,           ,            ,          ,
      That pres|ses them | and learns | them first | to bear,
       ,             ,            ,   ,         o
      Making | them wo|men of / good car|riage:
        ,        T
      This is | she.
 
ROMEO
                      T      T         ,  2     ,
100                 Peace, peace,| Mercu|tio, peace,
              ,         ,
      Thou talkst | of no|thing.
 
MERCUTIO
                                   ,        ,          ,
                                 True,| I talk | of dreams,
             ,          ,        ,       ,      ,
      Which are | the chil|dren of | an id|le brain,
         ,        ,               ,   ,     ,
      Begot | of no|thing but / vain fan|tasy,
             ,        ,        ,          ,        ,
105   Which is | as thin | of sub|stance as | the air
            ,       ,          ,          ,          ,
      And more | incon|stant than | the wind,| who woos
            ,         ,       ,      ,         ,
      Eene^now | the fro|zen bo|som of | the north,
           ,      ,          ,       ,            ,
      And be|ing an|gered, puffs | away | from thence,
        ,             ,              ,    ,         ,
      Turning | his face | to the / dew-drop|ping south.
 
BENVOLIO
             ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
110   This wind | you talk | of blows | us from | ourselves;
       ,            ,         ,           ,          ,
      Supper | is done,| and we | shall come | too late.
 
ROMEO
          ,         ,             ,   ,         ,
      I fear | too ear|ly: for / my mind | misgives
            ,       ,           ,       ,         ,
      Some con|sequence | yet hang|ing in | the stars
             ,      ,      ,          ,        ,
      Shall bit|terly | begin | his fear|ful date
             ,             ,       ,        ,          ,
115   With this | night's^re|vels and | expire | the term
                  ,     ,    ,      ,        ,
      Of a de//spised life clos|ed in | my breast
           ,      ,   ,                ,       ,
      By some | vile for/feit of | untime|ly death.
           ,          ,          ,        ,         ,
      But he | that hath | the steer|age of | my course,
          ,         ,     T  T  .  T      ,
      Direct | my sail:| On lusty gen|tlemen.
 
BENVOLIO
        __      __
120   Strike | drum.  \\
 
[Exeunt]

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