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Othello

Act III, Scene 3

The garden of the castle. Enter DESDEMONA, CASSIO, and EMILIA
 
DESDEMONA
           ,        ,       ,   ,         2      ,
      Be thou | assured |(good Cas/sio)| I will do
       ,         ,     ,        ,        ,
      All my | abil|ities | in thy | behalf.
 
EMILIA
             ,      ,      ,        ,      ,           ,     ->
      Good* ma|dam do:| I war|rant it | grieves my || husband
          ,         ,          ,
      As if | the case | were his.
 
DESDEMONA
      <- ,       2       ,        ,        ,         ,     ,
5       Oh that's an || honest | fellow.| Do not | doubt, Cas/sio,
          ,          ,         ,         ,       ,
      But I | will have | my lord | and you | again
           ,        ,         ,
      As friend|ly as | you were.
 
CASSIO
                                   ,   2      ,
                                 Bounteous | madam,
          ,    3     3    ,        ,        ,    ,
      Whate|ver shall become | of Mi|chael Cas|sio,
            ,     ,     2           ,    ,     ,
10    He's ne|ver an|ything but / your true | servant.
 
DESDEMONA
            x         ,           ,         ,         ,
      I know it;| I thank | you. You | do love | my lord:
         2       ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      You have known | him long;| and be | you well | assured
           ,           ,           ,         ,        ,
      He shall | in strange|ness stand | no fur|ther off
            ,    2    ,     ,
      Than in | a polite | distance.
 
CASSIO
                                      ,          ,
15                                   Aye, but | lady,
            ,    ,        ,        ,         ,
      That pol|icy | may ei|ther last | so long,
           ,      ,           ,         ,   2      x
      Or feed | upon | such nice | and wa|terish diet,
           ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
      Or breed | itself | so out | of cir|cumstance,
           ,          ,       ,         ,          ,
      That I | being ab|sent and | my place | supplied,
          ,    2    ,        ,         ,          ,       2->
20    My gen|eral will | forget | my love | and ser||vice.
 
DESDEMONA
          ,      ,              ,      ,  2    ,
      Do not | doubt that;| before | Emi|lia here
          ,          ,      3  3      ,         ,      ,
      I give | thee war|rant of thy place.| Assure | thee,
      <-      ,       ,        ,            ,        ,
        If || I do | vow a | friendship,| I'll per|form it
        2      ,     ,  2          ,           ,       ,
      To the last | article:| my lord | shall ne|ver rest,
             ,           ,          ,     ,     2      ,
25    I'll watch | him tame,| and talk | him out of | patience;
           ,            ,         ,           ,          ,
      His bed | shall seem | a school,| his board | a shrift,
            ,     ,       ,       ,          ,
      I'll in|termin|gle ev|ery thing | he does
            ,    2     ,      ,      2      ,       ,  2
      With Cas|sio's suit:| therefore be | merry | Cassio,
           ,       ,    ,           ,       ,
      For thy | soli|citor | shall ra|ther die
             ,          ,       ,
30    Than give | thy cause | away.
 
EMILIA
                                    ,             ,           ,  ->
                                   Madam,| here comes || my lord.
 
CASSIO
       ,             ,         ,
      Madam,| I'll take | my leave.
 
DESDEMONA
      <-      ,           ,       ,   ->
        Why stay,|| and hear me speak.
 
CASSIO
       ,           ,     2    ,      ,         ,  ->
      Madam,| not now:| I am ve||ry ill | at ease,
         ,                ,   ,      ,  ->
35    Unfit | for mine / own pur||poses.
 
DESDEMONA
        ,    ,             ,        oo
      Well, do / your dis|cretion.|
 
[Exit CASSIO. Enter OTHELLO and IAGO]
 
IAGO
      __       ,          ,
      Ha?| I like | not that.
 
OTHELLO
                                    ,          ,
                             What dost | thou say?
 
IAGO
       ,             ,        ,        ,          ,
      Nothing | my lord;| or if--| I know | not what.
 
OTHELLO
           ,          ,   2   ,        ,         ,
40    Was not | that Cas|sio par|ted from | my wife?
 
IAGO
       ,  2         ,         ,       ,        ,        2->
      Cassio | my lord?| No sure,| I can|not think || it
            ,           ,       ,         ,       ,
      That he | would steal | away | so guil|ty-like,
       ,            ,      2
      Seeing | you co|ming.
 
OTHELLO
                               ,       ,            ,
                            I do | believe | 'twas he.
 
DESDEMONA
           ,         ,
45    How now | my lord?
      ,              ,         ,        ,        ,  ->
      I have | been tal|king with || a sui|tor here,
         ,          ,       ,          ,         ,      ->
      A man | that lan|guishes || in your | displea|sure.
 
OTHELLO
       ,     ,            ,
      Who | is it | you mean?
 
DESDEMONA
            ,         ,       ,   2     ,         ,
      Why your | lieuten|ant Cas|sio. Good | my lord,
       ,  2       ,       ,          x          ,
50    If I have | any | grace or | power to | move you,
           ,        ,     ,   ,        ,
      His pre|sent re|conci|lia|tion take;
         2    ,       ,     ,          ,        ,
      For if he | be not | one that | truly | loves you,
             ,        ,     ,          ,        ,        ->
      That errs | in ig|norance | and not | in cun||ning,
      ,       2     ,        ,       ,        ,
      I | have no judg|ment in | an ho|nest face:
         ,         ,          ,
55    I pri|thee call | him back.  \\
 
OTHELLO
        T   T   T      ,
      Went he hence | now?
 
DESDEMONA
                                   ,          ,
                           Aye | sooth; so | humbled,
            ,          ,      ,    2        ,           ,
      That he | hath left | part of his | grief with | me,
      <-       ,         ,          T    T     T          ,
        To || suffer | with him.| Good love, call | him back.
 
OTHELLO
           ,           ,     ,    2     ,        ,
60    Not now |(sweet^Des|demo|na) some^o|ther time.
 
DESDEMONA
       ,    ,               ,
      But shall / it be | shortly?
 
OTHELLO
                                        ,         ,           ,  ->
                                   The soo|ner (sweet)|| for you.
 
DESDEMONA
        ,         ,      ,         ,
      Shall it | be to|night at | supper?
 
OTHELLO
      __    ,       ,
      No,| not to|night.
 
DESDEMONA
                            ,        ,         __  ->
65                      To|morrow | dinner || then?
 
OTHELLO
          ,           ,         ,    oo
      I shall | not dine | at home:|
          ,         ,         ,        ,    ,
      I meet | the cap|tains at | the cit|adel.
 
DESDEMONA
            ,       ,        ,          ,        ,
      Why then | tomor|row night,| on Tues|day morn,
           ,        ,         ,           ,         ,
      On Tues|day noon,| or night;| on Wednes|day morn.
         ,         ,          ,         ,        ,
70    I pri|thee name | the time,| but let | it not
          ,             ,         ,           ,     ,
      Exceed | three* days.| In faith | he's pen|itent;
           ,          ,    ,     2       ,        ,
      And yet | his tres|pass, in our | common | reason
         ,      2        ,          ,           ,      ,
      (Save that they | say the | wars must | make ex|amples)
       ,               ,        ,     ,           ,
      Out of | their best,| is not | almost | a fault
        2   ,       ,         ,            ,          ,
75    To incur | a pri|vate check.| When shall | he come?
        ,    2    ,         ,       ,        ,
      Tell me O|thello.| I won|der in | my soul
        ,               ,       3    3     ,        ,
      What you | would ask | me, that I should | deny
      <-     ,          ,     2    ,    __     ,         ,  2
        Or stand || so mam|mering on?| What?| Michael | Cassio,
             ,       ,     2      ,       2    ,   2    ,
      That came | a-woo|ing with you?| And so ma|ny a time
            ,          ,         ,         ,       ,
80    (When I | have spoke | of you | disprai|singly)
             ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      Hath tane | your part,| to have | so much | to do
           ,          ,     ,            ,          ,
      To bring | him in?| Trust me,| I could | do much.
 
OTHELLO
       ,             ,     ,          ,              ,
      Prithee | no more:| let him | come when | he will:
       3    3   ,         ,      2
      I will deny | thee no|thing.
 
DESDEMONA
                                         ,        ,        ,
85                                Why, this | is not | a boon;
            ,        ,         ,           ,            ,
      'Tis as | I should | entreat | you wear | your gloves,
           ,         ,     2    ,      2     ,          ,
      Or feed | on nour|ishing di|shes, or keep | you warm,
          ,        ,        ,    2   ,  2    ,      ->
      Or sue | to you | to do | a pecu|liar pro||fit
        2        ,   ,        ,        2    ,        ,
      To your / own per|son. Nay,| when I have | a suit
            ,       ,         ,            ,        ,
90    Wherein | I mean | to touch | your love | indeed,
           ,          ,         ,          ,    2       ,
      It shall | be full | of poise | and dif|ficult weight
            ,     3  3     ,     2
      And fear|ful to be gran|ted.
 
OTHELLO
                                       ,       ,         ,       ->
                                   I will | deny | thee no||thing.
        ,      2   ,       ,             ,          ,
      Where|on, I do | beseech | thee, grant | me this,
           ,         ,       ,       ,       ,
95    To leave | me but | a lit|tle to | myself.
 
DESDEMONA
            ,      ,         ,         ,         ,
      Shall I | deny | you? No:| farewell | my lord.
 
OTHELLO
            ,        ,     ,       ,      ,                 ,    ->
      Farewell | my Des|demo|na: I'll | come to || thee straight.
 
DESDEMONA
         ,  2    ,     ,   2        ,           ,       ->
      Emil|ia, come.| Be as your | fancies || teach you;
           ,         ,   ,   2   ,  2
      Whatere | you be,| I am o|bedient.
 
[Exeunt DESDEMONA and EMILIA]
 
OTHELLO
       ,            ,        ,        ,          ,
100   Excel|lent wretch: Perdi|tion catch | my soul,
          ,        ,           ,        2    ,          ,
      But I | do love | thee: and | when I love | thee not,
       ,           ,       ,
      Chaos | is come | again.
 
IAGO
                                  ,       ,
                              My no|ble lord.
 
OTHELLO
             ,          ,     x
      What dost | thou say,| Iago?
 
IAGO
           ,        ,    2     ,          ,         ,
105   Did Mi|chael Cas||sio, when | you wooed | my la|dy,
      <-  ,      2       ,
        Know | of your love?
 
OTHELLO
          ,           ,          ,          ,          ,
      He did,| from first | to last:| why dost | thou ask?
 
IAGO
       ,           ,     ,        ,         ,
      But for | a sat|isfac|tion of | my thought;
          ,         ,
      No fur|ther harm.
 
OTHELLO
                        ,              ,       x
110                    Why of | thy thought,| Iago?
 
IAGO
       2     ,      ,     2        ,       ,          ,
      I did not | think he had | been ac|quainted | with her.
 
OTHELLO
         ,          ,        ,         ,     ,
      O yes,| and went | between | us ve|ry oft.
 
IAGO
          ,
      Indeed?
 
OTHELLO
                 ,       2    ,         ,             ,           ,  ->
             Indeed?| Aye^indeed.| Discernst | thou aught || in that?
        2     ,     ,
      Is he not | honest?
 
IAGO
                            ,            ,
115                        Honest,| my lord?
 
OTHELLO
       ,       ___    ,
      Honest?| Aye,| honest.
 
IAGO
                                 ,          ,          ,  ->
                            My lord,| for aught || I know.
 
OTHELLO
             ,           ,
      What dost | thou think?
 
IAGO
                               ___         ,
                              Think,| my lord?
 
OTHELLO
       ___         ,      ,         ,         ,
120   Think,| my lord?| Alas,| thou e|choest me;
          ,           ,          ,        ,          ,
      As if | there were | some mon|ster in | his thought
           ,   2    ,        ,         2       ,      ,
      Too hi|deous to | be shown.| Thou dost mean | something:
          ,           ,     2    ,            ,            ,
      I heard | thee say | even now,| thou likedst | not that,
            ,   2    ,         ,           ,           ,
      When Cas|sio left | my wife:| what didst | not like?
            ,        ,        2    ,      2     ,     3
125   And when | I told | thee he was | of my coun|sel
      <-3  3     ,        ,          ,               ,          ,
         In my whole || course of | wooing,| thou criedst,| Indeed?
            ,          ,           ,           ,       ,      2->
      And didst | contract | and purse | thy brow | toge||ther,
          ,          ,            ,     ,            ,
      As if | thou then | hadst shut | up in | thy brain
            ,     ,         ,     ,     2         ,
      Some hor|rible | conceit.| If thou dost | love me,
        ,    2         ,
130   Show me thy | thought.
 
IAGO
                                    ,           ,        ,
                             My | lord, you | know I | love you.
 
OTHELLO
          ,            ,
      I think | thou dost:
           ,        ,        2      ,          ,         ,     , ->
      And for | I know | thou art full || of love,| and ho|nesty,
             ,            ,          ,           ,             ,  ->
      And weighst | thy words || before | thou givst | them breath,
        ,                 ,           ,        ,              ,  ->
135   Therefore | these stops || of thine | fright me | the more:
            ,       ,             ,         ,       ,  ->
      For such | things in || a false | disloy|al knave
             ,         ,         ,      2   ,             ,  ->
      Are tricks | of cus||tom: but | in a man | that's just,
                ,        ,          ,         ,          ,   ->
      They're close | dela||tions, wor|king from | the heart,
            ,        ,         ,
      That pas|sion can||not rule.
 
IAGO
                                       ,        ,    ,
140                               For Mi|chael Cas|sio,
      <-    ,          ,         ,           ,       ,      o
        I dare || be sworn,| I think | that he | is hon|est.
 
OTHELLO
          ,         ,
      I think | so too.
 
IAGO
                              ,          ,           ,
                       Men should | be what | they seem;
           ,                ,     ,            ,            ,
      Or those | that be / not, would | they might | seem none.
 
OTHELLO
       ,         T     T    T     ,           ,
145   Certain,| men should be | what they | seem.
 
IAGO
      <-         ,        ,    ,              ,       ,
        Why || then I | think Cas/sio's | an ho|nest man.
 
OTHELLO
      ___    T     T      T         ,
      Nay,| yet there's more | in this?
      <-   ,          ,         ,    ,   2        ,
        I pri||thee speak | to me,| as to thy | thinkings,
      <-     ,          ,     ,           ,          ,            ,
        As thou || dost ru|minate,| and give | thy worst | of thoughts
            ,          ,
150   The worst | of words.
 
IAGO
                             ,         ,   ,
                           Good my | lord par/don me,
        ,     2       ,         ,       ,        ,
      Though I am | bound to | every | act of | duty,
              ,    ,          ,           ,           ,
      I am / not bound | to that:| all slaves | are free:
       ,             ,           ,        2      ,          ,
      Utter | my thoughts?| Why say,| they are wild,| and false?
            ,            ,         ,            ,     ,
155   As where's | that pa|lace, where|into / foul things
        ,            ,      ,    ,                  ,           ,  ->
      Sometimes^|intrude | not? Who / has that | breast so || pure,
             ,      ,        ,     ,
      Where|in un|cleanly | appre|hensions
             ,          ,     ,             ,        ,
      Keep^leets,| and law-|days, and | in ses|sion sit
            ,    ,        ,
      With me|dita|tions law|ful?  \\
 
OTHELLO
             ,         ,         ,            ,      x
160   Thou dost | conspire | against | thy friend |(Iago)
           ,           ,             ,            ,          ,
      If thou | but thinkst | him wronged | and makst | his ear
          ,        ,           ,
      A stran|ger to | thy thoughts.
 
IAGO
                                     ,   2     ,
                                     I do be|seech you,
             ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      Though I | perchance | am vi|cious in | my guess,
          ,        ,        ,       ,           ,
165   (As I | confess | it is | my na|ture's plague
          ,     ,  2   ,           ,        ,           ->
      To spy | into ab|uses,| and oft | my jea||lousy /
        ,       ,         2     ,      ,          ,
      Shapes faults | that are not)| that your | wisdom
            ,          ,      ,       ,        ,
      From one | that so | imper|fectly | conceits,
              ,        ,        ,         2      ,        ,      ->
      Would take | no no|tice, nor | build^yourself | a trou||ble
       ,      2      ,     2           ,  ,       ,         ->
170   Out | of his scat|tering, and / unsure | obser||vance.
       ,         ,       2      ,      ,           ,
      It | were not | for your qui|et nor | your good,
       ,     2      ,          ,    ,         ,
      Nor for my | manhood*,| hone|sty, or | wisdom,
          ,          ,           ,
      To let | you know | my thoughts.
 
OTHELLO
                                             ,           ,
                                      What dost | thou mean?
 
IAGO
              ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
175   Good* name | in man,| and wo|man (dear | my lord)
       ,          ,   2    ,      ,           ,
      Is the | imme|diate je|wel of | their souls:
             ,          ,              ,           ,          ,        2->
      Who steals | my purse | steals^trash; 'tis some|thing, no||thing;
              ,          ,     ,     2         ,          ,
      'Twas mine,| 'tis his,| and has been | slave to | thousands:
           ,         ,         ,              ,    ,
      But he | that fil|ches from | me my / good name
        ,            ,           ,        ,      ,
180   Robs me | of that | which not | enrich|es him
            ,          ,        ,
      And makes | me poor | indeed.
 
      [it may be that the preceding and succeeding lines are matching trimeter]
     
OTHELLO
            x            ,            ,
      By heaven,| I'll know | thy thoughts.
 
IAGO
           ,        ,        ,           ,          ,
      You can|not, if | my heart | were in | your hand;
            ,             ,       ,    2      ,
      Nor shall | not, whilst | 'tis in my | custo|dy.
 
OTHELLO
                                                       ,
                                                      Ha?
 
IAGO
       T   T  T         ,        ,      ,
185   Oh, beware | my lord,| of jea|lousy;
       ,   2        T     T   T         ,            ,
      It is the | green-eyed mon|ster which | doth mock
            ,         ,         o          ,        ,           ,
      The meat | it feeds | on;   | that cuck|old lives || in bliss
           ,      3  3      ,      ,      2        ,
      Who cer|tain of his fate,| loves not his | wronger;
           ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      But oh,| what dam|ned mi|nutes tells | he ore,
            ,            ,          ,            ,        ,
190   Who dotes,| yet doubts:| suspects,| yet strong|ly loves?
 
OTHELLO
         ,    ,
      O mi|sery.  ????
 
IAGO
        ,              ,         ,          ,       ,
      Poor, and | content,| is rich,| and rich | enough,
            ,       ,    ,     2       ,        ,
      But rich|es fine|less, is as | poor as | winter,
          ,         ,       ,          ,          ,
      To him | that e|ver fears | he shall | be poor.
               x           ,         ,         ,         ,
195   Good* heaven,| the souls | of all | my tribe | defend
            ,      ,
      From jea|lousy.
 
OTHELLO
                     ___    T   T   T
                     Why?| Why is this?
         ,                 ,       ,        ,      ,
      Thinkst thou | I'd make | a lie | of jea|lousy,
          ,        ,           ,       ,         ,
      To fol|low still | the chan|ges of | the moon
             ,        ,          ,     2     ,         ,
200   With fresh | suspi|cions? No:| to be once | in doubt
           ,      3  3     ,          ,         ,        ,
      Is once | to be resolved:| exchange | me for | a goat,
           ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      When I | shall turn | the bus|iness of | my soul
           ,       ,     3   3      ,         ,
      To such | exsuf|flicate and blown | surmi|ses,
      <- ,        2     ,    2       ,     ,         ,        ,
        Mat||ching thy in|ference. 'Tis | not to | make me | jealous
          ,         ,         ,      T     T     T       ,     ,  ->
205   To say | my wife | is fair,| feeds well, loves || compa|ny,
             ,          T      T      T           ,      ->
      Is | free of | speech, sings, plays,|| and dan|ces;
        ,      ,    2          2      ,     ,   2
      Where | virtue is,| these are more | virtuous:
       ,      2       T    T   T        ,        ,
      Nor from mine^|own weak me|rits will | I draw
            ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      The smal|lest fear,| or doubt | of her | revolt;
           ,          ,          ,          ,    x
210   For she | had eyes,| and chose | me. No | Iago;
            ,        ,        ,                ,      ,
      I'll see | before | I doubt;| when I / doubt, prove;
           ,         ,            ,        ,          ,
      And on | the proof,| there is | no more | but this,
        ,         ,           ,        ,      ,
      Away | at once | with love,| or jea|lousy.
 
IAGO
       2     ,         ,         ,        ,           ,      2->
      I am glad | of this;| for now | I shall | have rea||son
           ,          ,         ,     ,         ,        2->
215   To show | the love | and du|ty that | I bear || you
             ,         x            ,       ,        ,
      With frank|er spirit:| therefore |(as I | am bound)
          ,       2      ,       ,          ,         ,
      Receive | it from me.| I speak | not yet | of proof:
        ,    2         ,        ,           ,          ,  2
      Look to your | wife, ob|serve her | well with | Cassio,
                     ,     ,         ,         ,        ,
      Wear* your / eyes, thus:| not jea|lous, nor | secure:
          ,           ,           ,         ,      ,       ->
220   I would | not have | your free,| and no|ble na||ture,
       ,         ,     ,        2    ,           x
      Out | of self-|bounty,| be abused:| look to it:
          ,          ,       ,     ,        ,
      I know | our coun|try dis|posi|tion well;
          ,         ,                x    ,           ,
      In Ve|nice, they | do let / heaven see | the pranks
             ,          ,           ,                   ,   ,          2->
      They dare | not show | their hus|bands. Their / best con||science
          ,         ,       2    ,          ,        ,
225   Is not | to leave | it undone,| but kept | unknown.
 
OTHELLO
        ,          ,
      Dost thou | say so?
 
IAGO
           ,        ,          ,         ,    2    ,  ->
      She did | deceive | her fa||ther, mar|rying you,
            ,           ,          ,            ,           ,   ->
      And when | she seemed | to shake,|| and fear | your looks,
            ,            ,
      She loved | them most.
 
OTHELLO
                                  ,         ,
230                          And so || she did.
 
IAGO
                                                    ,    ,
                                               Why go | to then;
      <- ,      2       ,              ,          ,       ,
        She that so | young could || give out | such a | seeming
      <-     ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
        To seal | her fa||ther's eyes | up, close | as oak,
      <-      ,             ,      ,   ->
        He thought |'twas witch||craft.
            ,        ,         ,   ->
235   But | I am | much to | blame:
           ,         ,      ,          ,         ,
      I | humbly || do be|seech you | of your | pardon
      <-     ,           ,       ,  ->
        For too || much^lo|ving you.
 
OTHELLO
      ,        ,          ,         ,    ->
      I am | bound to | thee for || ever.
 
IAGO
         ,           ,       ,         ,             ,      ->
      I see | this hath | a lit|tle dashed || your spi|rits.
 
OTHELLO
       ,       ,       2   ,
240   Not | a jot,| not a jot.
 
IAGO
      <-  ,             ,        ,  ->
        Trust me,|| I fear | it has.
          ,          ,        ,        ,         ,  ->
      I hope | you will | consi||der what | is spoke
        ,               ,
      Comes from | my love.
      <-    ,        ,             ,   ->
        But I || do see | you're moved:
         ,        ,          ,           ,           ,  ->
245   I am | to pray | you, not || to strain | my speech
           ,       ,        ,         ,        ,   ->
      To gros|ser is|sues, nor || to lar|ger reach,
            ,      ,
      Than to | suspi|cion.
 
OTHELLO
                           ,          ,  ->
                           I || will not.
 
IAGO
         ,          ,           ,
      Should you | do so |(my lord)
      <-      ,               ,             ,    ,         ,
250     My speech || should fall | into / such vile | success,
      <-  ,             T      T    T  ->
        Which my || thoughts aimed not.
       ,   2         ,         ,
      Cassio's | my wor|thy friend:
           ,       ,             ,
      My lord,| I see | you're moved.
 
OTHELLO
                                          ,           ,
                                      No not | much^moved:
         ,         ,          ,     ,       ,       ->
255   I do | not think | but Des|demo|na's hon||est.
 
IAGO
        ,      T   T   T         ,          ,          ,       2->
      Long | live she so:| and long | live^you || to think | so.
 
OTHELLO
           ,         ,       ,        ,         ,  ->
      And yet | how na|ture er|ring from || itself.
 
IAGO
             ,            ,      ,            ,           ,  ->
      Aye there's | the point:| as (to | be bold || with you)
       ,           ,     ,          ,       ,     ->
      Not to | affect | many | proposed || matches
                ,    ,          ,        ,         ,  ->
260   Of her / own clime,| complex|ion, and || degree,
        ,    2      ,        T     T     T         ,   ->
      Whereto we | see in | all things, na||ture tends:
       ,               ,          ,        ,            ,
      Foh, one | may smell | in such | a will || most^rank,
        ,          ,           ,         ,     ,
      Foul dis|propor|tion thoughts | unna||tural.
            ,       ,      ,        ,       ,     2->
      But (par|don me)| I do | not in || posi|tion
           ,        ,         ,           ,          , ->
265   Distinct|ly speak | of her;| though^I || may fear
            ,       ,      3  3     ,        ,        o ->
      Her will,| recoi|ling to her bet|ter judg||ment,
            ,         ,           ,          ,         ,  ->
      May fall | to match | you with | her coun||try forms
           ,     ,       ,
      And hap|pily | repent.
 
OTHELLO
                                   ,           ,  ->
                             Farewell,|| farewell:
           ,           ,         ,          ,            ,
270   If more | thou dost | perceive,| let me || know* more;
       ,             ,      2    ,       ,          ,     o
      Set on | thy wife | to observe:| leave me,|| Ia|go:
 
IAGO
           ,        ,         ,
      My lord,| I take | my leave.
 
OTHELLO
       ,     2     ,            ,        ,          ,         ->
      Why did I | marry?| This ho|nest crea|ture (doubt||less)
        ,       2        ,           ,          ,       ,
      Sees,| and knows^more,| much^more | than he | unfolds.
 
IAGO
           ,        ,         ,         ,           ,     2->
275   My lord,| I would | I might | entreat | your ho||nor
           ,           ,         ,          ,       2     ,
      To scan | this thing | no fur|ther; leave | it to time:
              ,       ,          ,   2    ,          ,
      Though it | be fit | that Cas|sio have | his place;
            ,         ,         ,          ,        ,   2  ->
      For sure | he fills | it up | with great | abil||ity;
       ,      2       ,          ,         ,       ,
      Yet | if you please,| to hold | him off | awhile:
            ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
280   You shall | by that | perceive | him and | his means:
        ,    2        ,        ,          ,      ,
      Note if your | lady | strain his | enter|tainment
        ,   2       ,          ,  2       ,     ,  2
      With any | strong, or | vehement | impor|tunity,
        ,              ,         ,               ,    ,
      Much will | be seen | in that.| In the / mean time,
           ,         ,           ,     ,        ,
      Let me | be thought | too bu|sy in | my fears,
           ,        ,         ,         ,       ,
285   (As wor|thy cause | I have | to fear | I am)
            ,          ,    ,   2     ,           ,
      And hold | her free,| I do be|seech your | honor.
 
OTHELLO
        ,            ,    3     3
      Fear not | my go|vernment.
 
IAGO
                                     ,            ,         ,
                                 I once | more* take | my leave.
 
[Exit]
 
OTHELLO
            ,         ,      ,        ,    ,
      This fel|low's of | excee|ding ho|nesty,
            ,          ,      ,        2    ,         x
290   And knows | all qua|lities | with a lear|ned spirit
          ,       ,         ,    2     ,          ,        ->
      Of hu|man deal|ings. If | I do prove | her hag||gard,
         ,         2     ,                   ,    ,     ,
      Though | that her jes|ses were my // dear heartstrings,
            ,     2     ,         ,          ,          ,
      I'd whis|tle her off,| and let | her down | the wind
           ,        ,         ,       ,     2     ,
      To prey | at for|tune. Hap|ly, for | I am black,
         2      ,            ,      ,         ,      ,
295   And have not | those soft | parts of | conver|sation
             ,     2     ,        ,       ,        ,
      That cham|berers have:| or for | I am | declined
       ,           ,         ,            ,           ,
      Into | the vale | of years |(yet that's | not much)
              ,       ,      ,          ,       ,
      She's gone.| I am | abused,| and my | relief
        ,    2        ,              ,         ,
      Must be to | loathe her.| Oh curse | of mar|riage!
      <-  ,       2      ,           ,    2     ,          ,
300     That || we can call | these del|icate crea|tures ours,
      <-     ,            ,     ,      2     ,       ,       ,
        And not || their ap|petites?| I had ra|ther be | a toad,
            ,      ,         ,    3  3   ,        o
      And live | upon | the va|por of a dun|geon,
             ,       ,     3  3      ,         ,
      Than keep | a cor|ner in the thing | I love
      <-    ,          ,      ,        2      ,           ,      __
        For o||thers' us|es. Yet | 'tis the plague | of great | ones,
          ,     ,           ,      ,               ,
305   Prero|gatived | are they | less than | the base;
            ,     ,       ,     ,           ,
      'Tis des|tiny | unshun|nable,| like^death:
      ,        ,            ,         ,         ,        ,    ->
      Even | then, this | forked | plague is | fated || to us,
            ,        ,         ,                 ,
      When we | do quick|en. Look | where* she comes:
          ,         ,      ,         ,       __
      If she | be false,| Heaven | mocks it|self:
        ,     2     ,
310   I'll not be|lieve it.
 
[Re-enter DESDEMONA and EMILIA]
 
DESDEMONA
                                    ,         ,       ,      ->
                               How now,| my dear | Othel||lo?
        ,     ,        ,         ,   2      ,   2
      Your | dinner,| and the | generous | islanders
          ,       ,       ,       ,          ,         ->
      By you | invi|ted, do | attend | your pre||sence.
 
OTHELLO
      ,     2     ,
      I | am to blame.
 
DESDEMONA
                       ,    2        ,          ,
315                   Why do you | speak so | faintly?
         3   3      ,
      Are you not well?
 
OTHELLO
                        3    3    ,      ,         ,         ,
                       I have a pain | upon | my fore|head here.
 
DESDEMONA
            ,            ,            ,       ,       ,
      Why that's | with wat|ching. 'Twill | away | again.
       ,             ,         ,        ,           ,
      Let me | but bind | it hard,| within | this hour
           ,         ,
320   It will | be well.
 
OTHELLO
                              ,     2    ,     ,
                        Your nap|kin is too | little:
       ,          ,      ,              ,         ,
      Let it | alone:| come, I'll | go in | with you.
 
DESDEMONA
      ,       ,      ,            ,       2      ,
      I am | very | sorry | that you | are not well.
 
[Exeunt OTHELLO and DESDEMONA]
 
EMILIA
      ,        ,             ,           ,       o
      I am | glad I | have found | this nap|kin:
        ,              ,        ,           ,          ,
325   This was | her first | remem|brance from | the Moor:
          ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      My way|ward hus|band hath | a hun|dred times
        ,     2       ,           2     ,     ,          ,
      Wooed me to | steal it;| but she so | loves the | token,
          2    ,         ,     ,           ,        ,
      (For he con|jured her,| she should | ever | keep it)
            ,         ,        ,      ,       ,        2->
      That she | reserves | it e|vermore | about || her
           ,          ,          ,        2      ,          ,
330   To kiss | and talk | to. I'll | have the work | tane^out,
            ,       , ,           ,         ,          , ->
      And give | it I|ago:| what he | will do || with it
       ,         T     T  T   oo
      Heaven | knows, not I;|
         ,         ,          ,          ,     ,
      I no|thing, but | to please | his fan|tasy.
 
[Re-enter Iago]
 
IAGO
           ,          ,         ,       ,
      How now?| What do | you here | alone?
 
EMILIA
      <-    ,           ,         ,        ,          ,
335     Do not || you chide;| I have | a thing | for you.
 
IAGO
      <-     ,           ,       ,      ,        ,
         A thing || for me?| It is | a com|mon thing--
 
EMILIA
                                                       __
                                                       Ha?
 
IAGO
           ,       ,         ,
      To have | a foo|lish wife.
 
EMILIA
                                  ,             ,
                                 Oh, is | that all?
        ,      2        ,        ,     2         ,    ,
340   What will you | give me | now for that | same hand/kerchief.
 
IAGO
        ,    ,
      What hand/kerchief?
 
EMILIA
                                ,       ,
                         What hand|kerchief?
      <- ,      2         T    T     T        ,     ,     o
        Why that the || Moor first gave | to Des|demo|na;
             ,         ,      ,         ,         ,
      That which | so of|ten you | did bid | me steal.
 
IAGO
            ,     2     ,
345   Hast sto|len it from | her?
 
EMILIA
      <- ,      2     ,         ,         ,      ,   ->
        No:| but she let | it drop || by neg|ligence,
       ,    2         ,        ,      2     ,        2    , ->
      And to the | advan|tage, I || being here,| took it up.
        T     T    T
      Look, here 'tis.
 
IAGO
                             ,       ,      ,          ->
                         A good || wench, give / it me.
 
EMILIA
        ,      2       ,     2       ,     2          ,        ,     ->
350   What will you | do with it,| that you have || been so | earnest
           ,         ,
      To have | me filch | it?
 
IAGO
                                ,         2     ,        ,  ->
                               Why,|| what is that | to you?
 
EMILIA
          ,       ,          ,      ,     2      ,     ->
      If it | be not | for some || purpose of | import,
        ,        ,    __       T   T T      T    T   T
      Give it | me a|gain:|| poor lady,| she'll run mad
      <-      ,             ,        o
355     When she || shall lack | it.
 
IAGO
                                           ,         ,     ,
                                       Be not | acknown | on it:
      ,         ,         T   T    T         o
      I have | use for | it. Go, leave | me.
 
[Exit EMILIA]
      ,     2      ,   2      ,          ,          ,
      I will in | Cassio's | lodging | lose this | napkin,
           ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
      And let | him find | it. Tri|fles light | as air,
       ,            ,         ,      ,          ,
360   Are to | the jea|lous, con|firma|tions strong,
            ,         ,      ,      ,     2       ,
      As proofs | of ho|ly writ.| This may do | something.
            ,       ,       ,     2      ,    ,
      The Moor | alrea|dy chan|ges with my | poison:
       ,   2           ,          ,          ,        ,        ->
      Dangerous | conceits,| are in | their na|tures poi||sons,
        ,       2      ,            ,       ,             ,
      Which | at the first | are scarce | found to | distaste:
            ,       ,       ,      ,          ,
365   But with | a lit|tle act | upon | the blood,
        ,      2        ,         ,        ,        ,
      Burn like the | mines of | Sulphur.| I did | say so.
        ,       2       ,           ,       ,       ,  2
      Look where he | comes: Not | poppy,| nor man|dragora,
           ,          ,      ,       ,         ,
      Nor^all | the drow|sy sy|rups of | the world
            ,      ,    2     ,                ,     ,
      Shall e|ver med|icine thee | to that / sweet sleep
                      ,    ,      ,
370   Which thou / owedst yes|terday.
 
OTHELLO
                                          ,     ,
                                      Ha ha,| false to me?
 
IAGO
           ,     ,   ,              ,         ,
      Why how | now gen/eral?| No more | of that.
 
OTHELLO
         ,          ,        2      ,        ,         ,
      Avaunt,| be gone:| thou hast set | me on | the rack:
          ,          ,       ,        ,       ,
      I swear |'tis bet|ter to | be much | abused,
            ,         ,      2   ,     2
375   Than but | to know | it a lit|tle.
 
IAGO
                                             ,         ,
                                        How now,| my lord?
 
OTHELLO
             ,         ,     2     ,        ,          ,
      What sense | had I,| in her sto|len hours | of lust?
           x             ,          ,          ,          ,
      I saw it | not, thought | it not:| it harmed | not me:
          ,           ,      T     T    T      ,            ,          ,    ->
      I slept | the next | night well, fed | well, was || free, and | merry.
          ,          ,    2    ,        ,         ,  ->
380   I found | not Cas|sio's kis||ses on | her lips:
       ,     2        ,           ,           ,        ,     ->
      He that is | robbed, not | wanting || what is | stolen,
         2     ,      ,             ,            ,         ,  ->
      Let him not | know it,| and he's || not robbed | at all.
 
IAGO
      ,       ,   2       ,
      I am | sorry to | hear this?
 
OTHELLO
         ,          ,       ,        ,   2     ,
      I had | been hap|py, if | the gen|eral camp,
       ,  2          ,         ,     2      ,      ,
385   Pioners | and all,| had tas|ted her sweet | body,
         ,        ,         ,         ,        ,     2->
      So I | had no|thing known.| Oh now,| for e||ver
            ,          ,         ,          ,         ,
      Farewell | the tran|quil mind;| farewell | content;
            ,         ,         ,                ,    ,
      Farewell | the plu|med troops,| and the / big wars,
             ,        ,        ,        ,         ,
      That makes | ambi|tion, vir|tue! Oh | farewell,
            ,          ,         ,                  ,     ,
390   Farewell | the neigh|ing steed,| and the / shrill trump,
             x      ,          T      Tx     T         ,
      The spirit-|stirring | drum, the ear-pier|cing fife,
           ,      ,              ,   ,     ,
      The roy|al ban|ner, and / all qua|lity,
        ,      ,        ,       ,          ,    2    ,
      Pride, pomp, and cir|cumstance | of glo|rious war:   ????
          ,        ,       ,                  ,     ,
      And O | you mor|tal en|gines, whose / rude throats
         2   ,        ,        ,    ,          ,       ,
395   The immor|tal Jove's | dread clamours, coun|terfeit, ????
            ,       ,        ,    ,          ,
      Farewell:| Othel|lo's oc|cupa|tion's gone.
 
IAGO
        2    ,     ,         ,
      Is it pos|sible | my lord?
 
OTHELLO
      <- ,             ,            ,          ,        ,
        Villain,| be sure || thou prove | my love | a whore,
      <-     ,        ,      ,            ,   2    ,
        Be sure | of it:|| give me | the oc|ular proof,
      <-    ,         ,           ,       ,        ,
400     Or by | the worth || of man's | eter|nal soul,
      <-       ,           ,         ,           ,       ,
        Thou hadst | been bet||ter have | been born | a dog
      <-      ,     2     ,        ,
        Than an|swer my waked || wrath.
 
IAGO
                                                  ,         ,
                                        Is | it come | to this?
 
OTHELLO
      <-  ,    2      ,         ,    2        ,           ,
        Make me to | see it;|| or (at the | least) so | prove it,
      <-  ,     2     ,          ,         ,            ,
405     That the pro|bation || bear no | hinge, nor | loop,
      <-       ,        ,             ,      ,          ,
        To | hang a | doubt on:|| or woe | upon | thy life.
 
IAGO
                                                                ,       ,
                                                            My no|ble lord.
 
OTHELLO
           ,           ,       ,         ,        ,
      If thou | dost slan|der her,| and tor|ture me,
       ,        ,            ,       ,        ,
      Never | pray more*:| aban|don all | remorse.
          ,          ,     ,           ,     ,
410   On hor|ror's head,| horrors | accu|mulate:
           ,       2      ,        ,          ,        ,
      Do deeds | to make^hea|ven weep,| all^earth | amazed;
           ,         ,           ,       ,       ,
      For no|thing canst | thou to | damna|tion add,
        ,    2         ,
      Greater than | that.
 
IAGO
                                 ,           x         ,
                           O | grace! O | heaven for|give me!
           ,       ,          ,        ,         ,
415   Are you | a man?| Have you | a soul?| Or sense?
           ,          ,          ,      2     ,         ,
      God by | you: take | mine^of|fice. Oh wret|ched fool,
             ,          ,           ,     ,       ,
      That lovst | to make | thine^ho|nesty,| a vice!
         ,           ,            ,           ,        ,
      O mon|strous world!| Take^note,| take^note |(O world)
          ,       ,         ,             ,    ,
      To be | direct | and ho|nest, is / not safe.
          ,          ,          ,        ,           ,
420   I thank | you for | this pro|fit, and | from hence
             ,          ,            ,             ,        ,
      I'll love | no friend,| sith love | breeds^such | offense.
 
OTHELLO
      ___    __             ,          ,      o
      Nay | stay:| thou shouldst | be ho|nest.
 
IAGO
           ,          ,         ,     ,         ,
      I should | be wise,| for ho|nesty's | a fool
           ,       ,         ,
      And lo|ses that | it works | for.
 
OTHELLO
                                         ,         ,
425                                     By | the world,
          ,          ,        ,        ,      ,             ,
      I think | my wife | be hon|est, and | think she | is not;   **Hexameter with next
          ,            ,          ,     ,           ,        ___
      I think | that thou | art just,| and think^|thou art | not:   **Hexameter with prev
             ,           ,          ,          ,         ,
      I'll have | some proof.| My name | that was | as fresh
          ,       ,        ,      2     ,           ,
      As Di|an's vis|age, is | now begrimed | and black
                ,    ,         ,          ,           ,
430   As mine^/own face.| If there | be cords,| or knives,
       ,            ,        ,     ,         ,
      Poison,| or fire,| or suf|foca|ting streams,
            ,        ,          ,      2      ,      ,
      I'll not | endure | it. Would | I were sa|tisfied.
 
IAGO
         ,       2     ,      ,         ,        o
      I see | you are ea|ten up | with pas|sion:
         ,       ,          ,       ,        ,        ->
      I do | repent | me, that | I put | it to || you.
       ,      ,         ,      T
435   You | would be | satis|fied?
 
OTHELLO
                                     T     T        2    ,  ->
                                   Would? Nay,|| and I will.
 
IAGO
           ,         ,    oo   oo
      And may:| but how?|    | 
      ___    ,      ,         __
      How | satis|fied, my | lord?
      <-  ,               ,     ,        ,        ,        o
        Would you || the su|pervis|ion gros|sly gape | on?
          ,           ,
440   Behold | her topped?
 
OTHELLO
                            ,              ,        ,
                          Death, and | damna|tion. Oh!
 
IAGO
           ,       ,   2    ,     ,     2    ,
      It were | a te|dious dif|ficu|lty, I think,
           ,           ,         ,           ,           ,
      To bring | them to | that pro|spect: damn | them then,
         ,      ,        ,        ,          ,       ->
      If e|ver mor|tal eyes | do see | them bol||ster
        ,        2       ,      T    T    T          o
445   More | than their own.| What then? How | then?
        ,       2     T      T     T     ,        o
      What shall I | say? Where's sat|isfac|tion?
          ,      ,     ,     ,            ,
      It is | impos|sible | you should | see this,
        ,      2       ,          ,          ,        ,
      Were they as | prime as | goats, as | hot as | monkeys,
           ,         ,           ,           ,          ,
      As salt | as wolves | in pride,| and fools | as gross
          ,     ,            ,          ,       ,
450   As ig|norance,| made^drunk.| But yet,| I say,
          ,    ,      2       ,      ,       ,
      If im|puta|tion, and strong | circum|stances,
              ,        ,      ,         ,         ,
      Which lead | direct|ly to | the door | of truth,
             ,         ,     ,         ,          ,        ->
      Will give | you sa|tisfac|tion, you | may have || it.
 
OTHELLO
        ,      2   ,       ,        ,         ,      o ->
      Give | me a li|ving rea|son she's | disloy||al.
 
IAGO
         ,         ,         ,       o
455   I do | not like | the of|fice.
            ,     2    ,        ,          ,         ,
      But sith | I am en|tered in | this cause | so far
          ,      2         ,        ,    ,          ,
      (Pricked to it | by foo|lish ho|nesty,| and love)
      ,     2      ,       ,          ,  2      ,
      I will go | on. I | lay with | Cassio | lately,
           ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      And be|ing trou|bled with | a ra|ging tooth,
          ,           ,            ,        ,        ,
460   I could | not sleep.| There are | a kind | of men
           ,          ,      ,    2           ,           ,
      So loose | of soul,| that in their | sleeps will | mutter
        ,        ,     ,                ,        ,  2
      Their af|fairs: One / of this | kind is | Cassio:
           ,         ,          ,           ,     ,     ->
      In sleep | I heard | him say,| sweet^Des|demo||na,
       ,      2    ,      ,         ,          ,
      Let | us be wa|ry, let | us hide | our loves,
            ,           ,          ,           ,          ,
465   And then |(sir) would | he gripe,| and wring | my hand,
       T    T   T       ,               ,         ,
      Cry, oh sweet | creature:| then kiss | me hard,
          ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
      As if | he plucked | up kis|ses by | the roots,
             ,      ,         ,      ,         ,              ,   ->
      That grew | upon | my lips,| laid his | leg ore || my thigh,
            ,          ,                ,   ,         ,  ->
      And sigh,| and kiss,| and then / cry cur||sed Fate,
             ,          ,         ,    oo
470   That gave | thee to | the Moor.|
 
OTHELLO
         ,           ,
      O mon|strous! mon|strous!
 
IAGO
                                 ,        2     ,          ,
                                Nay,| this was but | his dream.
 
OTHELLO
            ,       ,    2    ,    ,       ,
      But this | deno|ted a fore|gone con|clusion:
                  ,     ,             ,       ,        ,
      'Tis a / shrewd doubt,| though it | be but | a dream.
 
IAGO
            ,          ,         ,      ,         ,
475   And this | may help | to thick|en o|ther proofs
        T   T  T       ,       ,      oo
      That do de|monstrate | thinly.|
 
OTHELLO
             ,         ,        ,
      I'll tear | her all | to pie|ces.
 
IAGO
      <-  ,     ,         __     T   T  T     ,         __
         Nay | yet be || wise:| yet we see | nothing | done;
           ,        ,       ,      ,             ,
      She may | be ho|nest yet.| Tell me | but this,
            ,          ,          ,        ,       ,
480   Have you | not some|times^seen | a hand|kerchief
        ,              ,    ,                    ,      ,
      Spotted | with straw|berries | in your / wife's hand?
 
OTHELLO
          ,          ,       ,                 ,     ,
      I gave | her such | a one;| 'twas my / first gift.
 
IAGO
          ,          ,          ,        ,       ,
      I know | not that;| but such | a hand|kerchief
        2     ,        ,           ,          ,      ,
      (I am sure | it was | your wife's)| did I | today
           ,   2    ,          ,         2
485   See Cas|sio wipe | his beard | with.
 
OTHELLO
                                               ,        ,
                                           If it | be that.
 
IAGO
          ,        ,       ,      ,         ,
      If it | be that,| or a|ny, it | was hers.
            ,         ,           ,        ,         ,
      It speaks | against | her with | the o|ther proofs.
 
OTHELLO
      ,              ,          ,       ,         ,
      O that | the slave | had for|ty thou|sand lives:
       ,             ,          ,         ,       ,
490   One is | too poor,| too weak | for my | revenge.
       ,          ,          ,           ,     x
      Now do | I see |'tis true.| Look^here | Iago,
       ,         T    T    T      2    ,          x             ,
      All my | fond love thus | do I blow | to heaven.|| 'Tis gone.
         ,      ,    ,                      ,         ,  ->
      Arise,| black ven/geance, from | the hol||low hell.
             ,       ,          ,           ,          ,  ->
      Yield up |(O love)| thy crown | and hear||ted throne
          ,     2     ,      ,    ,                    ,    ->
495   To tyr|annous hate.| Swell bo/som with || thy fraught,
            ,        ,          ,
      For 'tis | of as|pics' tongues.
 
IAGO
                                           ,         ,  ->
                                      Yet be || content.
 
OTHELLO
           ,      ___     ___    oo
      Oh blood,| blood,| blood.|
 
IAGO
       ,            ,           ,         ,           ,
      Patience | I say:| your mind | perhaps | may change.
 
OTHELLO
       ,   2  ,       ,            ,       ,
500   Never I|ago.| Like to | the Pon|tic sea,
            ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      Whose^i|cy cur|rent, and | compul|sive course,
             ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      Nere feels | reti|ring ebb,| but keeps | due on
       ,           ,        ,         ,       ,
      To the | Propon|tic, and | the Hel|lespont:
        2   ,        ,         ,            ,   2     ,
      Even so | my bloo|dy thoughts,| with vi|olent pace
              ,           ,          ,        ,        ,
505   Shall nere | look back,| nere^ebb | to hum|ble love,
        ,            ,    ,          ,        ,
      Till that | a ca|pable | and wide | revenge
        ,             ,        ,         ,         x
      Swallow | them up.| Now by | yond mar|ble heaven,
                ,   ,    2     ,      ,       ,
      In the / due re|verence of | a sa|cred vow
          ,        ,         ,
      I here | engage | my words.
 
IAGO
                                             ,   ,
510                               Do not / rise yet:
 
       ,            ,      ,          ,        ,
      Witness | you e|ver-bur|ning lights | above,
           ,    ,            ,         ,       ,
      You el|ements,| that clip | us round | about,
       ,               ,     ,      ,          ,
      Witness | that here | Ia|go doth | give up
           ,   ,     2    ,     T     T      T
      The ex|ecu|tion of his | wit, hands, heart,
            ,         ,        ,         ,       2     ,
      To wronged | Othel|lo's ser|vice. Let | him command,
       ,         ,           ,       ,       ,
515   And to | obey | shall be | in me | remorse,
             ,      ,        ,    2
      What bloo|dy bus|iness e|ver.
 
OTHELLO
                                        ,           ,
                                    I greet | thy love,
                   ,     ,      ,      2    ,          ,    2
      Not with / vain thanks,| but with ac|ceptance | bounteous,
            ,      ,         ,        ,           x
      And will | upon | the in|stant put | thee to it:
          ,      T     T     T       2     ,          ,
520   Within | these three days | let me hear | thee say
            ,    2    ,       ,
      That Cas|sio's not | alive.
 
IAGO
                                        ,          ,
                                  My friend | is dead:
             ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      'Tis done | at your | request:| But let | her live.     
 
OTHELLO
        ,          T    T   T     ,          ,
      Damn her | lewd minx: O | damn her,| damn her.
            ,         ,      ,        ,          ,
525   Come go | with me | apart;| I will | withdraw,
          ,        ,                  ,    ,          ,
      To fur|nish me | with some / swift means | of death
         2      ,     ,       ,     2        ,       ,
      For the fair | devil.| Now art thou | my lieu|tenant.
 
IAGO
         ,         ,        ,      o   oo
      I am | your own | for e|ver.   |
 
[Exeunt]

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