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Othello

Act II, Scene 3

A hall in the castle. Enter OTHELLO, DESDEMONA, CASSIO, and Attendants
 
OTHELLO
            ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
      Good Mi|chael, look | you to | the guard | tonight.
              ,           ,           ,    ,       ,
      Let's teach | ourselves | that hon|ora|ble stop,
       T   T  T    ,        ,        oo
      Not to out|sport dis|cretion.|
 
CASSIO
       ,       ,       ,         ,        ,
      Ia|go, hath | direc|tion what | to do.
           ,        ,         ,        ,    2    ,
      But not|withstand|ing with | my pers|onal eye
           ,          x
      Will I | look to it.
 
OTHELLO
                            ,    2     ,     ,
                           Ia|go, is most | honest:
       ,               ,        ,        ,          ,     2  ->
      Michael,| good night.| Tomor|row with | your ear||liest,
       ,      2        ,           ,
Let | me have speech | with you. Come my | dear* love,
           ,          ,           ,          ,      ,
      The purch|ase made,| the fruits | are to | ensue,
            ,         ,         ,           ,        ,
      That prof|it's yet | to come |'tween me,| and you.
             ,
      Good night.  \\
 
[Exeunt OTHELLO, DESDEMONA, and Attendants. Enter IAGO]
 
CASSIO
Welcome Iago: we must to the watch.
 
IAGO
Not this hour lieutenant: 'tis not yet ten of the clock. Our general cast us thus early for the love of his Desdemona: who let us not therefore blame; he hath not yet made wanton the night with her: and she is sport for Jove.
 
CASSIO
She's a most exquisite lady.
 
IAGO
And I'll warrant her, fun of game.
 
CASSIO
Indeed, she's a most fresh and delicate creature.
 
IAGO
What an eye she has?
Methinks it sounds a parley of provocation.
 
CASSIO
An inviting eye:
And yet methinks right modest.
 
IAGO
And when she speaks,
Is it not an alarum to love?
 
CASSIO
She is indeed perfection.
 
IAGO
Well: happiness to their sheets. Come lieutenant, I have a stoup of wine, and here without are a brace of Cyprus gallants, that would fain have a measure to the health of black Othello.
 
CASSIO
Not tonight, good Iago: I have very poor, and unhappy brains for drinking. I could well wish courtesy would invent some other custom of entertainment.
 
IAGO
Oh, they are our friends: but one cup, I'll drink for you.
 
CASSIO
I have drunk but one cup tonight, and that was craftily qualified too: and behold what innovation it makes here. I am unfortunate in the infirmity, and dare not task my weakness with any more.
 
IAGO
What, man? 'Tis a night of revels, the gallants desire it.
 
CASSIO
Where are they?
 
IAGO
Here, at the door: I pray you call them in.
 
CASSIO
I'll do it, but it dislikes me.
 
[Exit]
 
IAGO
         ,        ,     2     ,     ,     ,
      If I | can fas|ten but one | cup u|pon him
             ,           ,          ,         ,        ,      ->
      With that | which he | hath drunk | tonight | alrea||dy,
        ,       2     ,         ,       ,        ,
      He'll | be as full | of quar|rel and | offense
          ,     T    T   T     ___   oo
      As my | young mistress'| dog.|
       ,         T    T   T    ,     o
      Now my | sick fool Rod|eri|go,
             ,            ,      ,    2        T     T   T
      Whom love | hath turned | almost the | wrong side out,
          ,     ,      ,        ,          ,
      To Des|demo|na hath | tonight | caroused
         ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      Pota|tions, pot|tle-deep;| and he's | to watch.
               ,        ,        ,       ,          x
      Three* lads | of Cy|prus, nob|le swel|ling spirits,
              ,           ,     3  3   ,     ,         o
      (That hold | their hon|ors in a wa|ry dis|tance,
           ,     ,     ,      2      ,         ,
      The ve|ry el|ements | of this war|like^isle)
           ,       ,       ,                ,        ,
      Have I | tonight | flustered | with flow|ing cups,
         2       ,      ,            ,             ,          ,
      And they watch | too.
Now | 'mongst this | flock of | drunkards
         ,       ,         ,   2   ,         ,      2->
      Am I | to put | our Cas|sio in | some ac||tion
            ,        ,          ,          ,           ,
      That may | offend | the isle.| But here | they come.
          ,       ,         ,        ,          ,
      If cons|equence | do but | approve | my dream,
           ,                      ,           ,           ,
      My boat | sails*^free|ly, both | with wind | and stream.
 
[Enter CASSIO; with him MONTANO and Gentlemen; servants following with wine]
 
CASSIO
'Fore heaven, they have given me a rouse already.
 
MONTANO
Good faith a little one: not past a pint, as I am a soldier.
 
IAGO
Some wine ho.
 
[Sings]  (Amphibrachic verse)
           ,            ,        ___     ___
      And let me | the cana|kin clink,| clink:
           ,            ,        ___
      And let me | the cana|kin clink.
         ,            ___
A soldier's | a man: Oh, man's life's but a span,
            ,          ___       ___
      Why then let | a sol|dier drink.
 
Some wine boys.
 
CASSIO
'Fore Heaven: an excellent song.
 
IAGO
I learned it in England: where indeed they are most potent in potting: your Dane, your German, and your swag-bellied Hollander (Drink ho) are nothing to your English.
 
CASSIO
Is your Englishman so expert in his drinking?
 
IAGO
Why, he drinks you, with facility, your Dane dead drunk. he sweats not to overthrow your Almain. He gives your Hollander a vomit, ere the next pottle can be filled.
 
CASSIO
To the health of our general.
 
MONTANO
I am for it lieutenant: and I'll do you justice.
 
IAGO
Oh sweet England.
            ,        ,       ,        ,
      King Ste|phen was | a worth|y peer,
            ,         ,         ,        ,
      His bree|ches cost | him but | a crown,
           ,          ,         ,          ,
      He held | them six|pence all | too dear,
             ,          ,          ,        ,
      With that | he called | the tail|or lown:
       ,           ,          ,        ,
      He was | a wight | of high | renown,
            ,         ,        ,        ,
      And thou | art but | of low | degree:
             ,            ,           ,        ,
      'Tis pride | that pulls | the count|ry down,
             ,            ,          ,        ,
      Then take | thine auld | cloak^a|bout thee.
 
Some wine ho.
 
CASSIO
Why this is a more exquisite song than the other.
 
IAGO
Will you hear it again?
 
CASSIO
No: for I hold him to be unworthy of his place, that does those things. Well: heaven's above all: and there be souls must be saved, and there be souls must not be saved.
 
IAGO
It's true, good lieutenant.
 
CASSIO
For mine own part, no offense to the general, nor any man of quality: I hope to be saved.
 
IAGO
And so do I too lieutenant.
 
CASSIO
Aye: (but by your leave) not before me. The lieutenant is to be saved before the ancient. Let's have no more of this: let's to our affairs. Forgive us our sins: Gentlemen let's look to our business. Do not think gentlemen, I am drunk: this is my ancient, this is my right hand, and this is my left. I am not drunk now: I can stand well enough, and speak well enough.
 
ALL
Excellent well.
 
CASSIO
Why very well then: you must not think then, that I am drunk.
 
[Exit]
 
MONTANO
To the platform (masters) come, let's set the watch.
 
IAGO
           ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      You see | this fel|low, that | is gone | before,
       ,   2     ,         ,         ,         ,
      He is a | soldier,| fit to | stand by | Caesar,
            ,       ,         ,      2     ,          ,
      And give | direc|tion. And | do but see | his vice,
            ,        ,             ,  ,     ,
      'Tis to | his vir|tue, a / just e|quinox,
           ,         ,      2    ,      2      ,   2    ,
      The one | as long | as the oth|er. 'Tis pi|ty of him:
          ,          ,        ,       ,         ,
      I fear | the trust | Othel|lo puts | him in,
           ,          ,        ,       ,     ,
      On some | odd^time | of his | infirm|ity,
             ,           ,     2
      Will shake | this is|land.
 
MONTANO
                                     ,       ,       ,
                                But is | he of|ten thus?
 
IAGO
            ,     ,         ,         ,         ,
      'Tis ev|ermore | the pro|logue to | his sleep,
              ,          ,     ,       ,       ,
      He'll watch | the ho|rologe | a doub|le set,
           ,           ,         ,
      If drink | rock^not | his cra|dle.
 
MONTANO
                                         ,          ,
                                        It | were well
           ,    ,          ,         ,        ,
      The gen|eral | were put | in mind | of it:
           ,         ,        ,      2      ,     ,
      Perhaps | he sees | it not,| or his good | nature
       ,            ,        ,        ,         ,     , ->
      Prizes | the vir|tue that | appears | in Cas||sio,
            ,      ,    2      ,           ,            ,  ->
      And looks | not on his | evils:| is not || this true?
 
[Enter RODERIGO]
 
IAGO
       T   T   T    ,     o
      How now Ro|deri|go?
          ,         ,    3   3     ,        ,   oo
      I pray | you aft|er the lieuten|ant, go.|
 
[Exit RODERIGO]
 
MONTANO
            ,           ,       ,         ,       ,
      And 'tis | great pi|ty, that | the nob|le Moor
              ,        ,        ,       2     ,     ,
      Should haz|ard such | a place,| as his own | second
            ,             ,  ,        ,     ,
      With one | of an / ingraft | infirm|ity,
           ,        ,       ,             ,   ,
      It were | an hon|est act|ion, to / say so
        2      ,
      To the Moor.
 
IAGO
                      ,         ,          ,       o
                  Not I,| for this | fair^is|land:
         ,         ,   2    ,          ,          ,
      I do | love Cas|sio well:| and would | do much
           ,     ,    2       ,            ,           ,
      To cure | him of this | evil.| But hark,| what noise?
 
[Enter CASSIO, driving in RODERIGO]
 
CASSIO
            ,          ,
      You rogue:| you ras|cal.
 
MONTANO
                                 ,          ,     2     ,       2->
                              What's | the mat|ter lieuten||ant?
 
CASSIO
          ,       ,         ,  ,               ,
      A knave | teach me | my du/ty?  I'll | beat the
        ,    ,          ,        ,
      Knave in/to a | twiggen | bottle.
 
RODERIGO
                                          ,
                                        Beat me?
 
CASSIO
        ,           T      T
      Dost thou | prate, rogue?
 
MONTANO
                                 T      ,        ,
                                Nay,| good lieu|tenant:
             ,         ,      ,           T
         I pray | you sir,| hold your | hand.
 
CASSIO
                                               T   T     ,      ->
                                              Let me || go (sir)
       ,          ,          ,         ,
      Or I'll | knock you | ore the | mazzard.
 
MONTANO
       __     __    oo            ,
      Come,| come:|    | you're drunk.
 
CASSIO
                                        ___
                                       Drunk?
 
[They fight]
 
IAGO
         ,      ,     ,    2       ,       ,  2
      Away | I say:| go out and | cry a | mutiny.
      ___     ,        ,         ,     ,   2
      Nay | good lieu|tenant.| Alas | gentlemen:
       __     ,        ,        ,       ,
      Help | ho. Lieu|tenant.| Sir Mon|tano:
        ,   ,                     ,       ,         ,
      Help mas/ters. Here's | a good|ly watch | indeed.
              ,            ,           ,      ,       ,
      Who's that | which rings | the bell?| Dia|blo, ho:
            ,           ,    ___    ,        ,
      The town | will rise.| Fie,| fie lieu|tenant,
       ,      2       ,          ,
      You will be | shamed for | ever.
 
[Enter OTHELLO and Attendants]
 
OTHELLO
                                         ,    2       ,          ,  ->
                                       What is the | matter || here?
 
MONTANO
            T     T    T        ,      2      ,
      I | bleed still, I | am hurt | to the death.
 
[Faints]
 
OTHELLO
        ,               ,
      Hold for | your lives.
 
IAGO
      <- __    __    oo        ,         ,        ,      ,      ,
        Hold | ho:||    | Lieuten|ant, Sir | Monta|no, gent|lemen:
        ,     2     ,          ,          ,          ,
      Have you for|got all | sense of | place and | duty?
        ,          ,  2        ,     2        ,         ___
      Hold. The | general | speaks to you:| hold for | shame.
 
OTHELLO
           ,         ,          ,        ,        ,
      Why how | now ho?| From whence | ari|seth this?
                  ,     ,          ,         ,          ,
      Are we / turned Turks?| And to | ourselves | do that
             ,        ,        ,         ,     ,
      Which heav|en hath | forbid | the Ot|tomites.
            ,          ,          ,         ,    2      ,
      For Chris|tian shame,| put by | this bar|barous brawl:
       ,                ,         ,                ,    ,
      He that | stirs^next,| to carve | for his / own rage,
        ,      2        ,           ,     ,         ,
      Holds his soul^|light: he | dies u|pon his | motion.
       ,               ,         ,          ,            ,
      Silence | that dread|ful bell,| it frights | the isle,
        ,     2     ,  2      ,    2       ,        ,
      From her pro|priety.| What is the | matter,| masters?
       ,        ,   2        ,       ,           ,
      Honest | Ia|go that lookst | dead with | grieving,
        ,             ,           ,         ,         ,           2->
      Speak: who | began | this? On | thy love | I charge || thee?
 
IAGO
         ,         ,             ,         ,     2    ,
      I do | not know:| friends^all,| but now,| even now
           ,        ,         ,            ,           ,
      In quart|er, and | in terms | like bride,| and groom
         ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Deves|ting them | for bed:| and then,| but now:
           ,         ,       ,       ,       ,
      (As if | some pla|net had | unwit|ted men)
              ,         ,        ,       ,           ,
      Swords^out,| and til|ting one | at oth|er's breast,
          ,    ,        ,      ,     2      ,
      In op|posi|tion bloo|dy. I | cannot speak
      ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      Any | begin|ning to | this peev|ish odds.
            ,         ,       ,    2    ,         ,
      And would,| in ac|tion glo|rious, I | had lost
              ,            ,          ,       ,        ,
      Those legs,| that brought | me to | a part | of it.
 
OTHELLO
            ,          ,         ,          ,        ,
      How comes | it (Mi|chael) you | are thus | forgot?
 
CASSIO
          ,         ,       ,      ,        ,
      I pray | you pard|on me,| I can|not speak.
 
OTHELLO
       ,    2     ,      ,           ,        ,
      Worthy Mon|tano,| you were | wont be | civil:
           ,     ,         ,         ,          ,
      The grav|ity,| and still|ness of | your youth
            ,           ,       ,           ,         ,
      The world | hath not|ed. And | your name | is great
            ,         ,       ,          ,           ,      2->
      In mouths | of wis|est cens|ure. What's | the mat||ter
            ,        ,          ,    ,        ,
      That you | unlace | your rep|uta|tion thus,
            ,            ,      ,        ,          ,
      And spend | your rich | opin|ion, for | the name
               ,     ,         ,        ,        x
      Of a / night-braw|ler? Give | me ans|wer to it.
 
MONTANO
       ,    2    ,      ,        ,        ,
      Worthy O|thello,| I am | hurt to | danger,
            ,    ,     ,        2     ,   ,
      Your of|ficer | Ia|go, can in/form you,
           2    ,        ,             ,          ,       ,
      While I spare | speech which | something | now of|fends me.
          ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      Of all | that I | do know,| nor know | I aught
          ,            ,         ,       ,           ,
      By me | that's said,| or done | amiss | this night,
          ,      ,    ,             ,       2    ,
      Unless | self-char/ity | be some|times a vice,
       ,           ,          ,         ,      ,
      And to | defend | ourselves | it be | a sin
            ,    ,         ,
      When vi|olence | assails | us.
 
OTHELLO
                                      ,          x
                                     Now | by heaven,
           ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      My blood | begins | my sa|fer guides | to rule,
           ,         ,     2     ,      ,         ,
      And pas|sion (hav|ing my best | judgment | collied)
          ,         ,         ,             ,    ,
      Assays | to lead | the way.| if I / once stir,
          ,         ,          ,          ,        ,
      Or do | but lift | this arm,| the best | of you
              ,        ,       ,      ,            ,
      Shall sink | in my | rebuke.| Give me | to know
                   ,    ,       ,         ,        ,
      How this / foul rout | began:| who set | it on,
           ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      And he | that is | approved | in this | offense,
              ,          ,            ,         ,       ,
      Though he | had twinned | with me,| both^at | a birth,
              ,          ,      2    ,        ,          ,
Shall lose | me. What | in a town | of war,
           ,           ,       ,            ,
Yet wild, the peo|ple's hearts | brimful | of fear,
      <-    ,        ,         ,       ,        ,       o
        To ma||nage priv|ate, and | dome|stic quar|rel?
           ,      ,    2        ,           ,          ,
      In night,| and on the | court and | guard of | safety?
            ,          o    x      ,      ,
      'Tis monst|rous:   | Iago,| who be|gan it?
 
MONTANO
          ,       ,       ,           ,          ,       2->
      If part|ially | affined,| or leagued | in of||fice,
             ,       ,       ,         ,           ,
      Thou dost | deliv|er more,| or less | than truth,
        ,            ,
      Thou art | no sol|dier.
 
IAGO
                               ,         ,         ,
                             Touch | me not | so near,
       2     ,        ,            ,      ,              ,
      I had rath|er have | this tongue | cut from | my mouth,
        ,    2          ,      ,         ,         ,  2
      Than it should | do of|fence to | Michael | Cassio.
       ,           ,         ,         ,           ,
      Yet I | persuade | myself,| to speak | the truth
             ,         ,            ,        ,    ,  2
      Shall noth|ing wrong | him. This | it is | general:
          ,     ,        ,     ,            ,
      Monta|no and | myself | being | in speech,
              ,        ,        ,       ,          ,
      There comes | a fel|low, cry|ing out | for help,
           ,   2   ,     2    ,        2   ,          ,
      And Cas|sio fol|lowing him | with deter|mined sword,
          ,    ,      ,          ,          ,     2   ->
      To ex|ecute | upon | him. Sir,| this gen||tleman,
        ,       2    ,   2    ,        ,            ,
      Steps | in to Cas|sio, and | entreats | his pause:
          ,         ,       ,       ,        ,
      Myself,| the cry|ing fel|low did | pursue,
        ,            ,        ,       ,         ,
      Lest by | his clam|or (as | it so | fell out)
            ,            ,          ,           ,          ,
      The town | might fall | in fright.| He (swift | of foot)
          ,        ,           3 3     ,      ,     ,
      Outran | my pur|pose: and I re/turned then | rather
            ,        ,           ,           ,          ,
      For that | I heard | the clink | and fall | of swords,
           ,   2    ,         ,            ,        ,
      And Cas|sio high | in oath:| which till | tonight
          ,           ,        ,         ,          ,
      I nere | might say | before.| When I | came back
             ,          ,         ,            ,        ,      2->
      (For this | was brief)| I found | them close | togeth|er
           ,           ,     ,       ,     ,            , ->
      At blow,| and thrust,| even | as a|gain they || were
              ,         ,          ,         oo
      When | you your|self did | part them.|
        ,             ,       ,      ,       ,
      More of | this mat|ter can|not I | report,
           ,         ,          ,          ,        ,
      But men | are men:| the best | sometimes | forget,
              ,   2   ,          ,        ,         ,
      Though Cas|sio did | some lit|tle wrong | to him,
          ,         ,             ,            ,           ,
      As men | in rage | strike^those | that wish | them best,
            ,      ,   2  ,       ,          ,
      Yet sure|ly Cas|sio I | believe | received
            ,           ,            ,         ,     ,
      From him | that fled | some strange | indign|ity,
             ,          ,           ,
      Which pa|tience could | not pass.
 
OTHELLO
                                            ,     x
                                        I know | Iago
           ,    ,          ,           ,           ,       ->
      Thy hon|esty,| and love | doth mince | this mat||ter,
       ,     2     ,         ,   2    ,   2       ,
      mak|ing it light | to Cas|sio: Cas|sio, I love thee, ????
           ,       ,        ,    ,         ,
      But nev|er more | be of|ficer | of mine.
        ,    2      ,         ,        T     T    T
      Look if my | gentle | love be | not raised up:
             ,      ,    2    ,
      I'll make | thee an ex|ample.
 
[Enter DESDEMONA, attended]
 
DESDEMONA
                                      ,    2       ,
What is the | matter (dear?)
 
OTHELLO
        T     T     T          ,      ,        ,
      All's well, sweet|ing:
Come | away | to bed. Sir for your hurts,
       ,     2         ,         ,          ,         ,
My|self will | be your | surgeon. Lead him off.
       ,       ,           ,       ,          ,
      Ia|go, look | with care | about | the town,
           ,         ,         2       ,      ,         ,
      And sil|ence those | whom this vile | brawl dis|tracted.
            ,     ,       ,         ,           ,
      Come Des|demo|na, 'tis | the sol|diers' life,
           ,           ,       ,         ,             ,
      To have | their bal|my slum|bers waked | with strife.
 
[Exeunt all but IAGO and CASSIO]
 
IAGO
What are you hurt lieutenant?
 
CASSIO
Aye, past all surgery.
 
IAGO
Marry heaven forbid.
 
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation: Oh I have lost my reputation. I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation.
 
IAGO
As I am an honest man I thought you had received some bodily wound; there is more sense in that than in reputation. Reputation is an idle, and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving. You have lost no reputation at all, unless you repute yourself such a loser. What man, there are ways to recover the general again. You are but now cast in his mood (a punishment more in policy, than in malice) even so as one would beat his offenseless dog, to affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again, and he's yours.
 
CASSIO
I will rather sue to be despised, than to deceive so good a commander, with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an officer. Drunk? and speak parrot? and squabble? swagger? swear? and discourse fustian with one's own shadow? Oh thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.
 
IAGO
What was he that you followed with your sword? What had he done to you?
 
CASSIO
I know not.
 
IAGO
Is it possible?
 
CASSIO
I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly: a quarrel, but nothing wherefore. Oh, that men should put an enemy in their mouths, to steal away their brains? That we should with joy, pleasance, revel and applause, transform ourselves into beasts.
 
IAGO
Why, but you are now well enough: how came you thus recovered?
 
CASSIO
It hath pleased the devil drunkenness, to give place to the devil wrath, one unperfectness, shows me another to make me frankly despise myself.
 
IAGO
Come, you are too severe a moraler. As the time, the place, and the condition of this country stands I could heartily wish this had not befallen: but since it is, as it is, mend it for your own good.
 
CASSIO
I will ask him for my place again, he shall tell me, I am a drunkard: had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast. Oh strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed, and the ingredient is a devil.
 
IAGO
Come, come: good wine, is a good familiar creature, if it be well used: exclaim no more against it. And good lieutenant, I think, you think I love you.
 
CASSIO
I have well approved it, sir. I drunk?
 
IAGO
You, or any man living, may be drunk at a time man. I'll tell you what you shall do: Our general's wife, is now the general. I may say so, in this respect, for that he hath devoted, and given up himself to the contemplation, mark: and denotement of her parts and graces. Confess yourself freely to her: importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness, not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you, and her husband, entreat her to splinter. And my fortunes against any lay worth naming, this crack of your love, shall grow stronger, than it was before.
 
CASSIO
You advise me well.
 
IAGO
I protest in the sincerity of love, and honest kindness.
 
CASSIO
I think it freely: and betimes in the morning, I will beseech the virtuous Desdemona to undertake for me: I am desperate of my fortunes if they cheque me here.
 
IAGO
You are in the right: good night lieutenant, I must to the watch.
 
CASSIO
Good night, honest Iago.
 
[Exit]
 
IAGO
             ,      ,            2     ,     ,         ,
      And what's | he then,
That says I | play the | villain?
        ,      2     ,         ,        ,          ,
      When this ad|vice is | free I | give, and | honest,
       ,            ,         ,        ,           ,
      Probal | to think|ing, and | indeed | the course
          ,          ,       ,          ,          ,    3->
      To win | the Moor | again.
For 'tis | most ea||sy
         2   ,        ,     ,     ,       ,
      The incli|ning Des|demo|na to | subdue
         ,     ,        ,             ,          ,       ->
      In an|y hon|est suit.| She's framed | as fruit||ful
        2        ,   ,     ,          ,         ,
      As the / free el|ements.| And then | for her
          ,          ,      ,    2      ,          ,  2
      To win | the Moor,| were to re|nounce his | baptism,
            ,          ,        ,      ,       ,
      All seals | and sym|bols of | redee|med sin:
            ,        ,      ,         ,         ,
      His soul | is so | enfet|tered to | her love,
        ,     2        T    T  T     ,              ,
      That she may | make, unmake,| do what | she list,
      ,        2     ,     ,            ,         ,
      Even | as her ap|petite | shall play | the god,
          2      ,     ,          ,    2      ,       ,
      With his weak | function.| How am I | then a | villain,
           ,       ,   2   ,         ,    2      ,
      To couns|el Cas|sio to | this par|allel course,
          ,    3  3      ,       ,    ,        ,
      Direct|ly to his good?| Divi|nity | of hell.
            ,        ,          ,         ,         ,
      When dev|ils will | the black|est sins | put^on,
            ,        ,         ,            x         ,
      They do | suggest | at first | with heaven|ly shows,
         ,       ,           ,           ,        ,
      As I | do now.| For whiles | this hon|est fool
             ,     ,    3  3    ,         ,        o
      Plies^Des|demo|na, to repair | his for|tune,
           ,         ,       ,      ,                 ,
      And she | for him,| pleads strong/ly to | the Moor,
             ,          ,      ,        ,        ,
      I'll pour | this pest|ilence | into | his ear:
            ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      That she | repeals | him, for | her bo|dy's lust
           ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      And by | how much | she strives | to do | him good,
            ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      She shall | undo | her cred|it with | the Moor.
           ,        ,         ,       ,      ,
      So will | I turn | her vir|tue in|to pitch.
           ,              ,    ,         ,         ,
      And out | of her / own good|ness make | the net,
        ,       2     ,          ,          ,       x
      That shall en|mesh them | all.
How | now Ro|derigo?
 
[Enter RODERIGO]
 
RODERIGO
I do follow here in the chase, not like a hound that hunts, but one that fills up the cry. My money is almost spent; I have been tonight exceedingly well cudgelled: and I think the issue will be, I shall have so much experience for my pains; and so, with no money at all, and a little more wit, return again to Venice.
 
IAGO
            ,          ,        2      ,     ,
      How poor | are they | that have not | patience?
             ,         ,       ,         ,       ,
      What wound | did ev|er heal | but by | degrees?
              ,          ,        ,       2           ,    ,
      Thou knowst | we work | by wit,| and not by / witchcraft
           ,        ,         ,    ,      ,
      And wit | depends | on di|lato|ry time:
            ,         ,     ,  2          ,        ,
      Dost not | go well?| Cassio | hath beat|en thee,
            ,      2       ,       ,           ,          ,  2
      And thou | by that small | hurt hast | cashiered | Cassio:
             ,         ,             ,        ,          ,
      Though oth|er things | grow* fair | against | the sun,
             ,            ,        ,            ,          ,
      Yet fruits | that blos|som first,| will first | be ripe:
           ,         ,       ,          ,           ,        ->
      Content | thyself,| awhile.| In troth | 'tis mor||ning;
        ,       2     ,        ,          ,             ,
      Pleas|ure, and ac|tion make | the hours | seem* short.
          ,           ,           ,         ,     ,
      Retire | thee, go | where thou | art bil|leted:
        ,       ,      ,       2         ,        ,
      Away,| I say,| thou shalt know | more here|after:
           ,           ,
      Nay get | thee gone.  \\
 
[Exit RODERIGO]
       ,     ,                   ,         ,           ,
      Two things / are to | be done:
My wife | must move for Cas|sio to | her mist|ress:
I’ll | set her on myself,| a while,| to draw | the Moor | apart,
            ,           ,          ,        ,        ,
      And bring | him jump,| when he | may Cas|sio find
         ,                 ,    ,     ,           ,
      Soli|citing his // wife: aye, that's | the way:
        ,            ,         ,         ,       ,
      Dull not | device,| by cold|ness, and | delay.
 
[Exit]

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