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Macbeth

Act II, Scene 1

Court of Macbeth's castle.
 
[Enter BANQUO, and FLEANCE bearing a torch before him]
 
BANQUO
How goes the night, boy?
 
FLEANCE
The moon is down: I have not heard the clock.
 
BANQUO
           ,           ,          ,
      And she | goes down | at twelve.
 
FLEANCE
            x           ,       ,
      I take it,| 'tis la|ter, sir. (tri with prev)
 
BANQUO
       __      T   T   T
      Hold,| take my sword:
               ,      ,          x
      There's hus|bandry | in heaven, (tri with prev)
             ,      2     ,     T     T    T          ,
      Their can|dles are all | out: Take thee | that^too.
         ,      ,         ,           ,     x
      A hea|vy sum|mons lies | like lead | upon me,
           ,    T   T    T      ,     oo
      And yet | I would not | sleep:|
       ,   2        x          ,         T  .     T       T
      Merciful | powers, re|strain in | me the cursed thoughts
            ,        ,      T   T  T        ,
      That na|ture gives | way to in | repose.
        ,            ,             ,
      Give me | my sword:| Who's^there?|
 
MACBETH
                                              ,     oo
                                         A friend.|
 
BANQUO
        ,             ,         ,          ,         ,
      What sir,| not yet | at rest?| The king's | a-bed:
       ,          ,         ,   2    ,         ,
      He hath | been in | unu|sual plea|sure, and
        T    T     T          ,      2      ,    ,
      Sent forth great | largess | to your of|fices.
            ,    ,          ,            ,        ,
      This di|amond | he greets | your wife | withal,
        2      ,     .   T    T   T         ,          ,
      By the name | of most kind hos|tess; and | shut^up
          ,        ,         ,
      In mea|sureless | content.
 
MACBETH
                                  2    ,      ,
                                Being un|prepared,
            ,        ,         ,        ,       ,
      Our will | became | the ser|vant to | defect;
        T     T     T       ,            T
      Which else should | free have | wrought.
 
BANQUO
                                                T     T
                                              All's well.
      .   T      T    T                ,     ,      ,
      I dreamt last night | of the / three weird | sisters:
          ,        2        ,             ,
      To you | they have showed | some* truth.
 
MACBETH
                                                 ,      ,    2
                                             I think | not of them:
            ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      Yet when | we can | entreat | an hour | to serve,
        2        ,         ,          ,       ,          ,        ->
      We would spend | it in | some words | upon | that bus||iness,
       ,      2        ,           ,
      If | you would grant | the time.
 
BANQUO
                                        2        ,      ,
                                      At your kindst | leisure.
 
MACBETH
          ,             ,         ,        ,           ,
      If you | shall cleave | to my | consent,| when 'tis,
           ,           ,      ,
      It shall | make ho|nor for | you.
 
BANQUO
                                          2      ,    ,
                                        So I / lose none
          ,        ,       ,                 ,     ,
      In see|king to | augment | it, but / still keep
          ,       ,     ,            ,          ,
      My bo|som fran|chised and | alle|giance clear,
          ,          ,
      I shall | be coun|selled.
 
MACBETH
                                  ,        ,          ,
                                Good | repose | the while.
 
BANQUO
        __     ___         ,        ,    oo
      Thanks | sir:| the like | to you.|
 
[Exeunt BANQUO and FLEANCE]
 
MACBETH
       ,    2       ,           ,         ,         ,
      Go bid thy | mistress,| when my | drink is | ready,
             ,       ,          ,     ,             ,
      She strike | upon | the bell.| Get thee | to bed.
       ,     2     ,         ,        ,       ,
      Is this a | dagger | which I | see be|fore me,
           ,         ,          ,      ,      2        ,
      The han|dle toward | my hand?| Come, let me | clutch thee:
          ,          ,         ,       ,           ,
      I have | thee not,| and yet | I see | thee still.
                  ,    ,      ,        ,     ,
      Art thou / not, fa|tal vi|sion, sen|sible
          ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      To fee|ling as | to sight?| Or art | thou but
         ,     3  3      ,        ,        ,       o
      A dag|ger of the mind,| a false | crea|tion,
          ,         ,          ,       ,        ,
      Procee|ding from | the heat-|oppres|sed brain?
         ,          ,         ,        ,     ,
      I see | thee yet,| in form | as pal|pable
           ,      T    T  T    __    oo
      As this | which now I | draw.|
            ,           ,        ,         ,         x
      Thou mar|shallst me | the way | that I | was going;
            ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      And such | an in|strument | I was | to use.
             ,          ,          ,       2    ,       ,       2->
      Mine^eyes | are made | the fools | of the o|ther sen||ses,
           ,           ,          ,       ,           ,
      Or else | worth all | the rest;| I see | thee still,
           ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      And on | thy blade | and dud|geon gouts | of blood,
             ,         ,       ,             ,          ,
      Which was | not so | before.| There's no | such thing:
       ,            ,      ,          ,         ,
      It is | the bloo|dy bus|iness which | informs
        ,              ,     ,     2       T    T   T
      Thus to | mine^eyes.| Now ore the | one halfworld
       ,               ,          ,        ,        ,
      Nature | seems^dead,| and wick|ed dreams | abuse
           ,           ,       T    T    T      ,
      The cur|tained sleep;| witchcraft ce|lebrates
        ,   , .      ,                  ,          ,
      Pale Hecate's^of//ferings: and | withered | murder,   (hec't sof)
        ,        ,        ,     ,          ,
      Ala|rumed by | his sen|tinel,| the wolf,
              ,            ,       ,               ,         ,
      Whose^howl's | his watch,| thus with | his steal|thy pace.
            ,          ,   2        ,         ,              ,
      With Tar|quin's ra|vishing strides,| towards his | design
        ,              ,            ,          ,         ,
      Moves like | a ghost.| Thou sure | and firm-|set earth,
             ,         ,            ,           ,          ,
      Hear* not | my steps,| which^way | they walk,| for fear
           ,       ,       ,             ,      ,
      Thy ve|ry stones | prate of | my where|about,
            ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      And take | the pre|sent hor|ror from | the time,
             ,      ,                 ,          ,          ,
      Which now | suits with | it. Whiles | I threat,| he lives:
        ,     2        ,         ,           T     T     T
      Words to the | heat of | deeds too | cold breath gives.
         ,        ,        ,          ,        ,         ->
      I go,| and it | is done;| the bell | invites || me.
        ,        ,     ,        ,    2         ,
      Hear | it not,| Duncan;| for it is | a knell
            ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      That sum|mons thee | to hea|ven or | to hell.
 
[Exit]

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