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Macbeth

Act I, Scene 5

Inverness. Macbeth's castle.
 
[Enter LADY MACBETH, reading a letter.]
 
LADY MACBETH
They met me in the day of success: and I have learned by the perfectest report, they have more in them than mortal knowledge. When I burned in desire to question them further, they made themselves air, into which they vanished. Whiles I stood rapt in the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who all-hailed me Thane of Cawdor; by which title, before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred me to the coming on of time, with Hail, king that shalt be! This have I thought good to deliver thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being ignorant of what greatness is promised thee. Lay it to thy heart, and farewell.
 
       ,             ,         ,        ,           ,
      Glamis | thou art,| and Caw|dor; and | shalt be
             ,         ,          ,      2    ,         ,       ->
      What thou | art pro|mised: yet | do I fear | thy na||ture;
       ,     2      ,      2      ,        ,       ,       2->
      It | is too full | of the milk | of hu|man kind||ness
           ,          ,        ,            ,           ,
      To catch | the nea|rest way:| thou wouldst | be great,
           ,         ,       ,        ,         ,
      Art^not | without | ambi|tion, but | without
           ,          ,           x       ,      2           ,
      The ill|ness should | attend it.| What thou wouldst^|highly,
        ,                  ,    ,            ,           ,
      That wouldst | thou ho|lily;| wouldst not | play false,
           ,              ,       ,
      And yet | wouldst wrong|ly win.  \\
          T      T     T      ,         ,           ___
      Thou'dst have, great | Glamis,| that which | cries,
        T    T    T    __    ,          ,
      Thus thou must | do,| if thou | have it;
            ,           ,        ,           ,        ,
      And that | which ra|ther thou | dost fear | to do
             ,         ,       2    ,     ,          ,
      Than wish|est should | be undone.| Hie thee | hither,
           ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      That I | may pour | my spi|rits in | thine^ear;
            ,    ,              ,      ,         ,
      And chas|tise with | the va|lor of | my tongue
       ,             ,            ,         ,        ,
      All that | impedes | thee from | the gol|den round,
              ,         ,    ,    2    ,           ,
      Which fate | and me|taphy|sical aid | doth seem
           ,            ,          ,      ,    2        ,
      To have | thee crowned | withal.| What is your | tidings?
 
MESSENGER
            ,            ,        ,
      The king | comes here | tonight.
 
LADY MACBETH
                                                ,          x
                                       Thou'rt mad | to say it.
          ,         ,        ,          ,        2    ,
      Is not | thy mas|ter with | him? Who,| were it so,
        ,               ,          ,     ,
      Would have | informed | for pre|para|tion.
 
MESSENGER
      <- ,       ,          ,        ,           ,         ,
        So || please you,| it is | true: our | Thane is | coming:
       ,           ,        ,          ,         ,
      One of | my fel|lows had | the speed | of him,
           ,        ,           ,            ,        ,
      Who al|most dead | for breath,| had scarce|ly more
             ,       ,    2       ,
      Than would | make up his | message.
 
LADY MACBETH
                                            ,         ,
                                          Give him | tending,
       .    T     T     T
      He brings great news.
 
[Exit Messenger]
                                 ,    2     ,          ,
                            The ra|ven himself | is hoarse,
              ,          ,      ,    ,         ,
      That croaks | the fa|tal en|trance of | Duncan
       ,          ,       ,       ,          ,
      Under | my bat|tlements.| Come, you | spirits
             ,        ,          ,         ,         ,
      That tend | on mor|tal thoughts,| unsex | me here,
            ,     ,     2        ,     2       T    T    T
      And fill | me from the | crown to the | toe, top^full
          ,        ,         ,      ,         ___
      Of di|rest cruel|ty: make | thick my | blood,
        ,            ,   ,         ,          2    ,
      Stop up | the ac|cess and | passage | to remorse,
            ,       ,           x     ,        ,
      That no | compun|ctious visit|ings of | nature
        ,          ,   ,                T    T    .  T
      Shake my | fell pur/pose, nor | keep peace between
         2    ,         ,     ,           ,          ,
      The effect,| and it.| Come to | my wo|man's breasts,
            ,         ,          ,         ,     2    ,     2    ->
      And take | my milk | for gall,| you mur|dering min||isters,
        ,  ,        2       ,         ,      ,
      Wher|ever | in your sight|less sub|stances
            ,        ,         ,           ,            ,
      You wait | on na|ture's mis|chief. Come,| thick^night,
            ,      ,            ,         ,          ,
      And pall | thee in | the dun|nest smoke | of hell,
                  ,    ,          ,          ,          ,
      That my / keen knife | see not | the wound | it makes,
             x       ,                  ,     3  3      ,
      Nor heaven | peep through*| the blan|ket of the dark,
      <-    ,       T     T     T      ,        ,        ,
        To cry,|| Hold, hold. Great | Glamis,| worthy | Cawdor,
 
[Enter MACBETH]
        ,              ,      2     ,     ,        ,
      Greater | than both,| by the all-|hail here|after!
           ,         ,          ,       ,       ,
      Thy let|ters have | transpor|ted me | beyond
            ,   2     ,         ,    T   T   T
      This ig|norant pre|sent, and | I feel now
           ,       ,        ,      2
      The fu|ture in | the in|stant.
 
MACBETH
                                         ,         ,
                                     My dea|rest love,
       ,         ,              ,
     Duncan | comes here | tonight.
 
LADY MACBETH
                                          ,           ,
                                    And when | goes hence?
 
MACBETH
         ,        ,       ,     ,
      Tomor|row, as | he pur|poses.
 
LADY MACBETH
                                       x
                                   O never,
             ,          ,       ,
      Shall sun | that mor|row see.  \\
             ,         ,         ,       ,           ,
      Your face,| my Thane,| is as | a book,| where men
       T    T     T       ,          2    ,           ,
      May read strange | matters.| To beguile | the time,
             ,          ,          ,        ,         ,
      Look^like | the time;| bear wel|come in | your eye,
             ,            ,            ,         ,   2       x
      Your hand,| your tongue:| look^like | the in|nocent flower,
       ,    2       ,         ,   2      ,           ,
      But be the | serpent | under it.| He that's | coming
        ,           ,      ,         ,           ,
      Must be | provi|ded for:| and you | shall put
              ,        ,    ,               ,        ,
      This night's | great bus/iness in|to my | dispatch,
              ,         ,           ,           ,         ,
      Which shall | to all | our nights,| and days | to come,
             ,       ,          ,         ,      ,
      Give sole|ly sove|reign sway,| and mas|terdom.
 
MACBETH
                  ,    ,
      We will / speak fur|ther.
 
LADY MACBETH
                                ,      ,         ,
                               On|ly look | up clear;
          ,      ,     ,      ,        ,
      To al|ter fa|vor e|ver is | to fear:
             ,          ,        ,
      Leave all | the rest | to me.  \\
 
[Exeunt]

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