Prescanned Shakespeare.com
presented by Acoustic Learning


Julius Caesar

Act V, Scene 1

The plains of Philippi.
 
[Enter OCTAVIUS, ANTONY, and their army]
 
OCTAVIUS
           ,    ,         ,          ,         o
      Now An|tony,| our hopes | are an|swered:
            ,         ,   ,          ,           ,
      You said | the en|emy | would not | come^down,
            ,          ,          ,      ,        o
      But keep | the hills | and up|per re|gions;
            ,          ,          ,        ,         ,
      It proves | not so:| their bat|tles are | at hand;
             ,         ,        ,       ,       ,
5     They mean | to warn | us at | Philip|pi here,
       ,   2          ,        ,       ,         ,
      Answering | before | we do | demand | of them.
 
ANTONY
       ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      Tut I | am in | their bo|soms, and | I know
             ,          ,         ,           ,        ,
      Wherefore | they do | it: they | could be | content
          ,     ,       ,               ,    ,
      To vi|sit o|ther pla|ces; and / come down
             ,       ,    2     ,        ,          ,
10    With fear|ful bra|very, thin|king by | this face
          ,     3  3        ,             ,          ,        o
      To fas|ten in our thoughts | that they | have cou|rage;
            ,         ,
      But 'tis | not so.
 
[Enter a Messenger]
 
MESSENGER
                             ,         ,     ,
                        Prepare | you gen|erals:
           ,   ,          ,       ,         ,
      The en|emy | comes^on | in gal|lant show;
              ,       ,        ,             ,   ,
15    Their bloo|dy sign | of bat|tle is / hung out,
            ,         ,        ,       ,   2   ,
      And some|thing to | be done | imme|diately.
 
ANTONY
         ,   2     ,          ,        ,      ,
      Octa|vius, lead | your bat|tle soft|ly on
        ,          ,      ,           ,       ,
      Upon | the left | hand of | the e|ven field.
 
OCTAVIUS
        ,          ,          ,          ,          ,
      Upon | the right | hand^I;| keep thou | the left.
 
ANTONY
       ,             ,         ,         ,    ,
20    Why do | you cross | me in | this ex|igent?
 
OCTAVIUS
         ,         ,           ,        ,        ,
      I do | not cross | you; but | I will | do so.
 
[March. Drum. Enter BRUTUS, CASSIUS, and their Army; LUCILIUS, TITINIUS, MESSALA, and others]
 
BRUTUS
             ,        2        ,     ,
      They stand,| and would have | parley.
 
CASSIUS
      <-  ,       ,        ,        ,         ,          ,    oo
        Stand | fast, Ti||tini|us: we | must out | and talk.|
 
OCTAVIUS
            ,    ,     ,     2         ,        ,
      Mark^An|tony,| shall we give | sign of | battle?
 
ANTONY
       ,  ,                  ,       ,            ,
25    No Cae/sar, we | will an|swer on | their charge.
             ,          ,     ,            ,           ,
      Make^forth;| the gen|erals | would have | some words.
 
OCTAVIUS
        T   T   T  ,         ,
      Stir not un|til the | signal.
 
BRUTUS
      <-  ,          ,     ___     ,       ,    ,
        Words || before | blows:| is it | so, coun/trymen?
 
OCTAVIUS
       ,      2       T    T    T             ,   ,
      Not that we | love words bet|ter, as / you do.
 
BRUTUS
             ,          ,     2      ,       ,         ,  2
30    Good words | are bet|ter than bad | strokes, Oc|tavius.
 
ANTONY
                 ,     ,       ,             ,           ,
      In your / bad strokes,| Brutus,| you give | good words:
       ,              ,          ,        ,          ,
      Witness | the hole | you made | in Cae|sar's heart,
       ,         T    T     T     ,
      Crying | long live, Hail | Caesar.
 
CASSIUS
                                         ,  2
                                        Antony,
           ,        ,          ,          ,        ,
35    The pos|ture of | your blows | are yet | unknown;
           ,           ,           ,         ,       ,
      But for | your words,| they rob | the Hy|bla bees,
            ,           ,      ,
      And leave | them ho|neyless.
 
ANTONY
                                        ,         ,
                                  Not sting|less too.
 
BRUTUS
      T  T    T      ,         ___   oo
      O yes, and | soundless | too;|
           ,          ,     2       ,         ,    ,
40    For you | have sto|len their buz|zing, An|tony,
           ,      ,        ,         ,          ,
      And ve|ry wise|ly threat | before | you sting.
 
ANTONY
       ,              ,         ,       2       ,     ,
      Villains:| you did | not so,| when your vile | daggers
        ,       2   ,        ,         ,         ,
      Hacked one a|nother | in the | sides of | Caesar:
             ,            ,            ,           ,             ,
      You showed | your teeth | like apes,| and fawned | like hounds,
            ,            ,        ,        ,          ,
45    And bowed | like bond|men, kis|sing Cae|sar's feet;
              ,       ,        ,       ,        ,
      Whilst^dam|ned Cas|ca, like | a cur,| behind
         ,    ,                 ,    ,         ,   2
      Struck Cae/sar on | the neck.| O you | flatterers.
 
CASSIUS
        ,           ,     ,         ,         __
      Flatte|rers? Now | Brutus | thank your|self,
              ,          ,       ,       ,      ,
      This tongue | had not | offen|ded so | today,
          ,         ,            ,
50    If Cas|sius might | have ruled.
 
OCTAVIUS
      <- __    __           ,         ,   2     ,         ,
        Come, come,|| the cause:| if ar|guing make | us sweat,
      <-      ,          ,          ,        ,        ,       __
        The proof || of it | will turn | to red|der drops.|| Look;
          ,        ,         ,         ,      ,
      I draw | a sword | against | conspi|rators;
             ,      ,               ,           ,      ,
      When think | you that | the sword | goes^up | again?
       ,            ,          ,           ,        ,
55    Never | till Cae|sar's three | and thir|ty wounds
           ,        ,      ,     2   ,        ,
      Be well | avenged;| or till a|nother | Caesar
            ,        ,      3  3      ,          ,
      Have ad|ded slaugh|ter to the sword | of trai|tors.
 
BRUTUS
      <- ,          ,      T    T   T         ,          ,
        Cae||sar, thou | canst not die | by trai|tors' hands,
          ,            ,             ,
      Unless | thou bringst | them with | thee.
 
OCTAVIUS
                                                 ,       ,
60                                              So | I hope;
         ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      I was | not born | to die | on Bru|tus' sword.
 
BRUTUS
         ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      O if | thou wert | the no|blest of | thy strain,
             ,            ,           ,          ,   2  ,
      Young^man,| thou couldst | not die | more hon|orable.
 
CASSIUS
         ,          ,          ,       2     ,     ,
      A pee|vish school|boy, worth|less of such | honor,
         ,             ,        ,       ,     ,
65    Joined with | a mas|ker, and | a rev|eller.
 
ANTONY
           ,         ,
      Old^Cas|sius still.
 
OCTAVIUS
                                ,    ,     ,
                          Come^An|tony:| away:
         ,        ,          ,        ,          ,
      Defi|ance trai|tors, hurl | we in | your teeth:
                 ,    ,        ,      ,             ,
      If you / dare fight | today,| come to | the field;
          ,      T   T    T     ,
70    If not,| when you have | stomachs.
 
[Exeunt OCTAVIUS, ANTONY, and their army]
 
CASSIUS
      <- ,           T    T     T      ,             ,      ,
        Why now || blow wind, swell | billow,| and swim | bark:
      <-         ,         ,         ,        ,        , 
        The || storm is | up, and | all is | on the | hazard.
 
BRUTUS
       ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      Ho Lu|cili|us, hark,| a word | with you.
 
LUCILIUS [Standing forth]
           ,
      My lord.
 
[BRUTUS and LUCILIUS converse apart]
 
CASSIUS
                  ,    2
              Messa|la.
 
MESSALA [Standing forth]
                                ,        ,   3   3
75                       What says | my gen|eral?
 
CASSIUS
                                                       ,     ->
                                                   Messa||la,
        ,      2     ,         ,         ,     ,
      This | is my birth|day; as | this ve|ry day
           ,         ,      ,    2        ,       ,
      Was Cas|sius born.| Give me thy | hand Mes|sala:
           ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      Be thou | my wit|ness that | against | my will,
           ,       ,       ,         ,         ,
80    (As Pom|pey was)| am I | compelled | to set
        ,     ,   ,                 ,      ,
      Upon | one bat/tle all | our lib|erties.
            ,               ,   ,   ,        ,
      You know | that I / held Ep|icu|rus strong
           ,      ,        ,         ,          ,
      And his | opin|ion: now | I change | my mind,
            ,       ,        ,           ,        ,
      And part|ly cred|it things | that do | presage.
       ,    2        ,         2     ,       ,
85    Coming from | Sardis,| on our for|mer ensign
      <- ,      ,        ,         ,           ,            ___
        Two || mighty | eagles | fell, and | there they | perched,
       ,             ,         ,         ,           ,
      Gorging | and fee|ding from | our sol|diers' hands;
       ,           ,       ,        ,       ,
      Who to | Philip|pi here | consor|ted us:
            ,        ,           ,      ,          ,
      This mor|ning are | they fled | away | and gone;
           ,            ,         ,         ,           ,
90    And in | their steads | do ra|vens, crows,| and kites
           ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
      Fly ore | our heads | and down|ward look | on us,
          ,          ,       ,           ,         ,
      As we | were sick|ly prey:| their sha|dows seem
         ,          ,   ,       ,       ,
      A can|opy / most fa|tal, un|der which
           ,      ,     ,           ,      2      ,
      Our^ar|my lies,| ready | to give | up the ghost.
 
MESSALA
          ,          ,
95    Believe | not so.
 
CASSIUS
                        ,    2     ,          ,
                        I but be|lieve it | partly;
          ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      For I | am fresh | of spi|rit and | resolved
           ,         ,       ,     ,        ,
      To meet | all per|ils ve|ry con|stantly.
 
BRUTUS
        2   ,      ,    ,
      Even so | Lucil|ius.
 
CASSIUS
       ,         ,       ,
100   Now most^|noble | Brutus,  (tri with prev)
            ,       ,      ,     ,                   ,
      The gods | today | stand friend/ly, that | we may,
       ,            ,           ,         ,        ,
      Lovers | in peace,| lead^on | our days | to age.
            ,        2    ,         ,           ,        ,       ->
      But since | the affairs | of men | rest^still | incer||tain,
        ,      ,           2      ,           ,        ,
      Let's | reason | with the worst | that may | befall.
          ,        ,          ,         ,         ,
105   If we | do lose | this bat|tle, then | is this
           ,      ,      ,               ,        ,       ->
      The ve|ry last | time we | shall speak | toge||ther:
        ,         ,      ,      ,             ,
      What | are you | then de|termined | to do?
 
BRUTUS
      ,        2      ,         ,        ,    ,
      Even | by the rule | of that | philo|sophy
           ,               ,    ,  ,             ,
      By which | I did / blame Ca|to for | the death
             ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
110   Which he | did give | himself,| I know | not how:
          ,        ,        ,      ,         ,
      But I | do find | it cow|ardly | and vile,
            ,         ,            ,     ,           ,
      For fear | of what | might fall,| so to | prevent
            ,         ,     ,    2     ,          ,
      The time | of life:| arming my|self with | patience
           ,         ,      ,                 ,     x
      To stay | the pro|vidence | of some / high powers
            ,       ,      ,
115   That go|vern us | below.
 
CASSIUS
                                ,     2       ,           ,     ->
                              Then, if we | lose this || battle,
       ,            ,       ,       ,         ,      ->
      You are | conten|ted to | be led || in tri|umph
         ,             ,           ,
      Through | the streets | of Rome?
 
BRUTUS
      <-__     ,         ,          ,          ,       ,
        No || Cassius,| no: think^|not thou | noble | Roman,
           ,      ,              ,   ,          ,
120   That e|ver Bru|tus will / go bound | to Rome;
           ,           ,         ,                 ,   ,
      He bears | too great | a mind.| But this / same day
            ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      Must end | that work | the ides | of March | begun;
           ,      3  3        ,       ,    T   T   T
      And whe|ther we shall meet | again | I know not.
             ,        ,     ,         ,         ,
      Therefore | our e|verlas|ting fare|well take:
         ,       ,       ,        ,        ,        ->
125   Fore|ver, and | fore|ver, fare|well Cas||sius:
        2      ,   ,       ,         ,           ,
      If we / do meet | again,| why we | shall smile;
          ,          ,          ,               ,    ,
      If not,| why then | this par|ting was / well made.
 
CASSIUS
         ,     3   3   ,             ,   ,       o
      Fore|ver, and fore|ver, fare/well Bru|tus:
          ,        ,       ,            ,         ,
      If we | do meet | again,| we'll smile | indeed;
          ,           ,          ,               ,    ,
130   If not,| 'tis true,| this par|ting was / well made.
 
BRUTUS
            ,          ,   ,           ,            ,
      Why then | lead on.| O that | a man | might know
           ,                ,    ,         ,         ,
      The end | of this / day's bus|iness ere | it come:
           ,       ,        ,         ,          ,
      But it | suffi|ceth that | the day | will end,
            ,         ,         ,           ,     ,
      And then | the end | is known.| Come^ho,| away.
 
[Exeunt]

← Previous Scene | Next Scene →


Home