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Hamlet

Act IV, Scene 7

Another room in the castle.
 
[Enter CLAUDIUS and LAERTES]
 
CLAUDIUS
       ,               ,           ,       ,           ,
      Now must | your con|science my | acquaint|ance seal,
           ,          ,        ,          ,            ,
      And you | must put | me in | your heart | for friend,
        ,                ,           ,        ,       ,
      Since you | have heard,| and with | a know|ing ear,
            ,           ,          ,      ,        ,
      That he | which hath | your nob|le fath|er slain,
          ,      T   T
      Pursued | my life.
 
LAERTES
                         .   T        ,           ,
                        It well | appears.| but tell || me,
       ,       2    ,       ,        ,             ,
      Why | you proceed|ed not | against | these feats,
           ,         ,     ,  ,   2         ,
      So crime|ful, and | so cap/ital in | nature,
       ,   2         ,       ,        T     T     T
      As by your | safety,| wisdom,| all things else,
            ,              ,     ,
      You main|ly were / stirred up?
 
CLAUDIUS
       2     ,     ,         ,
      O for two | special | reasons;  (tri with prev)
        ,      2      ,         ,            ,      ,
      Which may to | you (per|haps) seem | much un|sinewed,
           ,        ,       2       ,           ,          ,      ->
      But yet | to me | they are strong.| The queen | his moth||er,
        ,      ,         2      ,          ,       ,
      Lives | almost | by his looks:| and for | myself,
          ,       ,         ,       2    ,        ,
      My vir|tue or | my plague,| be it eith|er which,
             ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      She's so | conjunct|ive to | my life | and soul;
            ,         ,           ,         ,          ,
      That as | the star | moves^not | but in | his sphere,
          ,          ,        ,         ,      ,       >
      I could | not but | by her.| The oth|er mot||ive,
       ,      2   ,        ,         ,          ,
      Why | to a pub|lic count | I might | not^go,
        2      ,       ,         ,  2      ,         ,
      Is the great | love the | general | gender | bear him,
       ,   ,          2         ,          ,       ,
      Who dip/ping all his | faults in | their af|fection,
              ,           ,            ,        ,         ,
      Would like | the spring | that turn|eth wood | to stone,
           ,          ,           x      ,     2      ,
      Convert | his gyves | to graces.| So that my | arrows
             ,       ,               ,   ,        ,
      Too slight|ly tim|bered for / so loud | a wind,
        ,              ,      ,       ,       ,
      Would have | revert|ed to | my bow | again,
             ,          ,         ,          oo
      And | not where | I had | aimed them.|
 
LAERTES
           ,        ,      ,      ,        ,
      And so | have I | a nob|le fath|er lost,
         ,       ,       ,      ,    2     ,
      A sis|ter driv|en in|to desp|erate terms,
              ,          ,       ,         ,       ,
      Whose worth |(if prais|es may | go back | again)
        ,     ,                ,         ,         ,
      Stood chal/lenger | on mount | of all | the age
           ,        ,          ,      2    ,            ,
      For her | perfec|tions. But | my revenge | will come.
 
CLAUDIUS
             ,            ,           ,
      Break not | your sleeps | for that,
                                               ,          ,
                                         You must | not think
            ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      That we | are made | of stuff,| so flat,| and dull,
            ,        ,          ,          ,            ,     2->
      That we | can let | our beard | be shook | with dang||er,   ??
            ,         ,    ,           ,               ,       ,  ->
      And think | it pas|time. You | shortly | shall hear || more,
            ,           ,          2     ,         ,
      I | loved your | father,| and we love | ourself,
            ,        ,           ,      ,    2   ,
      And that | I hope | will teach | you to i|magine--
           ,           ,
      How now?| What news?
 
[Enter a Messenger]
 
MESSENGER
       ,             ,          ,         ,         ,
      Letters | my lord | from Ham|let. This | to your
       ,    ,     ,              ___    oo
      Maje|sty: this / to the | queen.|
 
CLAUDIUS
            ,        ,       ,
      From Ham|let? Who | brought them?  \\
 
MESSENGER
       ,             ,          ,       ,          ,
      Sailors | my lord | they say,| I saw | them not:
                    x    ,         ,   2   ,        ,           2->
      They were / given me | by Claud|io, he | received || them.
 
CLAUDIUS
         ,      ,            ,
      Laert|es you | shall hear | them:
                                          ,
                                        Leave | us.
 
[Exit Messenger. Reads:]
High and mighty, You shall know I am set naked on your kingdom. Tomorrow shall I beg leave to see your kingly eyes. When I shall (first asking your pardon thereunto) recount the occasion of my sudden, and more strange return. Hamlet.
 
              ,            ,         ,          ,           ,
      What should | this mean?| Are all | the rest | come^back?
          ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
      Or is | it some | abuse?| Or no | such thing?
 
LAERTES
Know you the hand?
 
CLAUDIUS
'Tis Hamlet's character, naked and in a postscript here he says alone: can you advise me?
 
LAERTES
            ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      I'm lost | in it | my lord;| but let | him come,
           ,          ,      ,        ,        ,
      It warms | the ve|ry sick|ness in | my heart,
           ,           ,          ,         ,         ,
      That I | shall live | and tell | him to | his teeth,
        T    T     T
      Thus didst thou.  \\
 
CLAUDIUS
       ,   2      ,   ,                   ,       2     ,
      If it be*| so Laert/es, as | how should | it be* so:  ??
           ,      ,          ,         ,         ,
      How^oth|erwise | will you | be ruled | by me?
 
LAERTES
          ,           ,         ,        ,       ,
      If so | you'll not | orerule | me to | a peace.
 
CLAUDIUS
                 ,    ,         ,       ,         ,
      To thine^/own peace:| If he | be now | returned,
           ,        ,        ,        ,        2     ,
      As check|ing at | his voy|age, and | that he means
           ,        ,        x     ,          ,
      No more | to und|ertake it;| I will | work him
               ,  ,           ,        ,       ,
      To an / exploit,| now ripe | in my | device,
       ,            ,          ,            ,           ,
      Under | the which | he shall | not choose | but fall;
           ,          ,          ,         ,              ,
      And for | his death | no^wind | of blame | shall breathe,
            x          ,    2       ,    ,           ,
      But even | his moth|er shall un|charge the | practice,
            ,        ,   3    3
      And call | it ac|cident*:
 
LAERTES
                                     ,        ,         ,
                                My lord,| I will | be ruled;
            ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
      The rath|er, if | you could | devise | it so
           ,          ,        ,
      That I | might be | the org|an.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                            ,     ,
                                     It / falls right.
       ,      2          T    T   T            ,       ,
      You have been | talked of since | your trav|el much,
            ,        ,          ,        ,        ,    3 3->
      And that | in Ham|let's hear|ing, for | a qual||ity
            ,         ,          ,           ,         ,
      Wherein | they say | you shine:| your sum | of parts
           ,       ,        ,           ,      ,        2->
      Did not | togeth|er pluck | such en|vy from || him
          ,      T   T    .    T        ,       ,
      As did | that one, and that,| in my | regard,
        3   3   ,     2     ,
      Of the unworth|iest siege.
 
LAERTES
                                      ,         ,         ,
                               What part | is that | my lord?
 
CLAUDIUS
         ,     ,       ,        ,         ,
      A ve|ry rib|and in | the cap | of youth,
            ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      Yet need|ful too;| for youth | no less | becomes
            ,           ,        ,  2     ,         ,
      The light | and care|less liv|ery that | it wears
            ,        ,         ,       ,          ,
      Than set|tled age | his sab|les and | his weeds,
         ,         ,            ,          ,             ,
      Import|ing health | and grave|ness. Two | months^since,
        ,           ,      ,        ,      ,
      Here was | a gent|leman | of Norm|andy,
             ,        ,           ,         ,            ,
      I've seen | myself,| and served | against | the French,
       .    T   T    T         ,     ,                 x
      And they ran well | on horse|back; but | this gallant
            ,     ,     2          ,     ,           ,
      Had witch|craft in it;| he grew | unto | his seat,
                 ,    ,        ,        ,            ,
      And to / such wond|rous do|ing brought | his horse,
       ,   2        ,        ,           ,     ,
      As he had | been in|corpsed and | demi-|natured
                   ,     ,         ,          ,           ,
      With the / brave beast,| so far | he topped | my thought,
           ,       ,     ,         ,            ,
      That I | in for|gery | of shapes | and tricks,
              ,          ,     ,    2
      Come* short | of what | he did.
 
LAERTES
                                       ,         x
                                    A Nor|man was it?
 
CLAUDIUS
         ,      o
      A Nor|man.
 
LAERTES
                    ,         ,        ,
                  Upon | my life | Lamond.
 
CLAUDIUS
           ,      ,
      The ve|ry same.  \\
 
LAERTES
          ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      I know | him well,| he is | the brooch | indeed,
           ,        ,         ,
      And gem | of all | the na|tion.  \\
 
CLAUDIUS
           ,        ,        ,
      He made | confes|sion of | you,  \\  (tetra with prev)
            ,          ,       ,      ,       ,
      And gave | you such | a mast|erly | report,
           ,         ,     ,         ,        ,
      For art | and ex|ercise | in your | defense;
           ,          ,   2    ,      ,       ,
      And for | your rap|ier most | espe|cially,
            ,          ,             ,       ,         ,
      That he | cried^out,| 'twould be | a sight | indeed,
          ,            ,      ,           ,     3  3         ,
      If one | could match | you: the | scrimers of their | nation,  ??
           ,          ,       2     ,         ,          ,
      He swore,| had had | neither mo|tion, guard,| nor eye,
          ,        ,           ,        2    ,        ,
      If you | opposed | them Sir.| This report | of his
           ,       ,      ,       ,         ,    2->
      Did Ham|let so | enven|om with | his en||vy,   ??
            ,          ,        ,         ,         ,
      That he | could noth|ing do | but wish | and beg,
            ,       ,       ,         ,          ,
      Your sud|den com|ing ore | to play | with him;
           ,         ,
      Now^out | of this.
 
LAERTES
                              ,         ,         ,
                         Why out | of this,| my lord?
 
CLAUDIUS
         ,      ,          ,        ,        ,
      Laert|es was | your fath|er dear | to you?
          ,          ,          ,    ,          ,
      Or are | you like | the pain|ting of a | sorrow,  ??
          ,         ,        ,
      A face | without | a heart?
 
LAERTES
                                       ,          ,
                                  Why^ask | you this?
 
CLAUDIUS
       ,      2      ,          ,          ,          ,
      Not that I | think you | did not | love your | father,
       ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
      But that | I know | love is | begun | by time:
            ,       ,        ,     ,         ,
      And that | I see,| in pas|sages | of proof,
        ,    ,                ,           ,        ,
      Time qual/ifies | the spark | and fire | of it:
              ,          ,        ,      ,          ,
      There lives | within | the ve|ry flame | of love
          ,         ,         ,            ,         x
      A kind | of wick | or snuff | that will | abate it,
           ,        ,            ,    ,         ,
      And noth|ing is | at a / like good|ness still,
            ,         ,       ,       ,    ,
      For good|ness grow|ing to | a plur|isy,
        ,            ,          ,      ,              ,
      Dies in | his own | too much:| that we | would do
            ,          ,         ,        2       ,       ,
      We should | do when | we would,| for this would | changes
            ,       ,         ,        ,        ,    2->
      And hath | abate|ments and | delays | as ma||ny
           ,            ,            ,          ,     ,
      As there | are tongues,| are hands,| are ac|cidents;
            ,            ,          ,        ,            ,
      And then | this should | is like | a spend|thrift^sigh,
             ,         ,        ,      2      ,       2     ,     ->
      That hurts | by eas|ing. But | to the quick | of the ul||cer
       ,               ,     ,         2     ,      ,
      Ham|let comes^/back: what | would you und|ertake,
           ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      To show | yourself | your fath|er's son | in deed,
        ,              ,
      More than | in words?
 
LAERTES
                                ,          ,        2       ,
                            To cut | his throat | in the church.
 
CLAUDIUS
           ,         ,            ,        ,    2  ,
      No place | indeed | should murd|er sanct|uarize;
          ,              ,          ,      ,      2    ,
      Revenge | should have | no bounds:| But good La|ertes
            ,         ,       ,    ,        2            ,
      Will you | do this, | keep close / within your | chamber,
       ,            ,             ,                ,    ,
      Hamlet | returned,| shall know | you are / come home:
             ,         ,              ,           ,      ,
      We'll put | on those | shall praise | your ex|cellence,
           ,        ,       ,       ,         ,
      And set | a doub|le varn|ish on | the fame
             ,         ,           ,        2     ,       ,       2->
      The French|man gave | you, bring | you in fine | togeth||er,
           ,      ,          ,      ,   2         ,
      And wag|er on | your heads,| he being | remiss,
        ,   ,    2            ,          ,       ,
      Most gen/erous, and | free from | all con|triving,
            ,        ,          ,          ,           ,
      Will not | peruse | the foils?| So that | with ease,
           ,       ,        ,          ,          ,
      Or with | a lit|tle shuf|fling, you | may choose
          ,        ,       ,      2    ,         ,       2->
      A sword | unbat|ed, and | in a pass | of prac||tice,  ??
           ,         ,          ,
      Requite | him for | your fath|er.
 
LAERTES
                                        ,          x
                                        I | will do it,
           ,          ,         ,       ,          ,
      And for | that pur|pose I'll | anoint | my sword:
           ,         ,        ,       ,      ,
      I bought | an un|ction of | a mount|ebank
          ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      So mort|al, I | but dip | a knife | in it,
             ,           ,         ,      x         ,
      Where it | draws^blood,| no cat|aplasm | so rare,
          ,     2      ,     ,          ,          ,
      Collec|ted from all | simples | that have | virtue
       ,            ,          ,          ,            ,
      Under | the moon,| can save | the thing | from death,
            ,           ,            ,          ,          ,
      That is | but scratched | withal:| I'll touch | my point,
             ,        ,         ,      2    ,           ,       2->
      With this | contag|ion, that | if I gall | him slight||ly,   ??
          ,         ,
      It may | be death.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                ,        ,          ,
                        Let's^furth|er think | of this,
        ,              ,          ,         ,          ,
      Weigh what | conven|ience both | of time | and means
           ,        ,         ,          ,             ,
      May fit | us to | our shape,| if this | should fail;
       ,      2        ,            ,           ,       ,
      And that our | drift look^|through our | bad per|formance,
                x      ,       ,            ,          ,
      'Twere better | not as|sayed; there|fore this | project
               ,        ,        ,         ,            ,
      Should have | a back | or sec|ond, that | might hold,
           ,             ,          ,       ,             ,
      If this | should blast | in proof:| Soft, let | me see
              ,       ,       ,  ,    2        ,
      We'll make | a sol|emn wa|ger on your | cunnings,  ??
            x       ,    2        ,          2     ,         ,
      I have it:| When in your | motion | you are hot | and dry,
           ,           ,       ,   ,   2              ,
      As make | your bouts | more vi/olent to | that end,
            ,         ,           ,       ,      2      ,
      And that | he calls | for drink;| I'll have pre|pared him
          ,       ,          ,           ,        ,        ->
      A chal|ice for | the nonce;| whereon | but sip||ping,
       ,     2      ,        ,           ,         ,
      If | he by chance | escape | your ven|omed stuck,
           ,        ,           ,          ,             ,
      Our pur|pose may | hold there;| How now | sweet* queen.
 
[Enter GERTRUDE]
 
GERTRUDE
           ,           ,       ,      ,          ,
      One^woe | doth tread | upon | anoth|er's heel,
           ,          ,       o         ,            ,         ,      o ->
      So fast | they fol|low:   | your sis|ter's drowned || Laert|es.
 
LAERTES
        ___         ,     oo
      Drowned!| O where?|
 
GERTRUDE
             ,      ,        ,        ,         ,
      There is | a wil|low grows | aslant | a brook,
             ,           ,       ,              ,        ,
      That shows | his hoar | leaves in | the glas|sy stream:
        ,              ,       ,         ,          ,
      There with | fantas|tic garl|ands did | she come,
       .   T     Tx       Tx      ,              ,     ,
      Of crow-flowers, nettles,| daisies,| and long | purples,
            ,    2    ,          ,        ,        ,
      That lib|eral shep|herds give | a gros|ser name;
         2      ,      ,          T    T    T         ,          ->
      But our cold | maids do | dead men's fing|ers call || them:
        ,       2      ,         ,          ,   2     ,
      There | on the pend|ent boughs,| her cor|onet weeds
        ,   2           ,        ,   2     ,       ,
      Clambering | to hang;| an env|ious sliv|er broke,
             ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      When down | her wee|dy troph|ies, and | herself,
        ,    2       ,          ,             T       T     T
      Fell in the | weeping | brook. Her | clothes spread wide,
           ,         ,       ,            ,         ,
      And mer|maid^like,| awhile | they bore | her up,
              ,          ,         ,            ,    ,
      Which time | she chant|ed snatch|es of / old tunes,
          ,       ,    ,      2     ,         ,
      As one | incap|able | of her own | distress,
           ,        ,        ,        ,        ,
      Or like | a creat|ure nat|ive, and | indued
       ,  2        ,  2           ,         ,          ,
      Unto that | element:| but long | it could | not be,
        ,              ,          ,       ,            ,
      Till that | her gar|ments, hea|vy with | their drink,
         ,           ,     ,                   ,   2    ,
      Pulled the | poor wretch / from her | melod|ious lay,
          ,       ,
      To mud|dy death.  \\
 
LAERTES
         ,          ,          ,
      Alas | then, she | is drowned?
 
GERTRUDE
                                      ___       ___
                                    Drowned,| drowned.
 
LAERTES
            ,        ,       ,           ,      ,    3 3->
      Too much | of wat|er hast | thou poor | Ophe||lia,
            ,        ,       ,         ,          ,
      And there|fore I | forbid | my tears:| but yet
          ,         ,      ,            ,        ,
      It is | our trick,| nature | her cust|om holds,
            ,      ,              ,           ,           ,
      Let shame | say what | it will;| when these | are gone,
           ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      The wom|an will | be out:| Adieu | my lord,
          ,         ,          ,           ,            ,
      I have | a speech | of fire,| that fain | would blaze,
       ,      2        ,         ,
      But that this | folly | doubts it.
 
[Exit]
 
CLAUDIUS
             ,        ,
      Let's^fol|low, Gert|rude:    \\
            ,       ,        ,        ,          ,
      How much | I had | to do | to calm | his rage?
            ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      Now fear | I this | will give | it start | again;
        ,      2         ,
      Therefore let's | follow.  \\
 
[Exeunt]

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