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Hamlet

Act IV, Scene 5

Elsinore. A room in the castle.
 
[Enter GERTRUDE, HORATIO, and a Gentleman]
 
GERTRUDE
I will not speak with her.
 
GENTLEMAN
She is importunate, indeed distract, her mood will needs be pitied.
 
GERTRUDE
What would she have?
 
GENTLEMAN
             ,       ,            ,         ,          ,
      She speaks | much of | her fath|er; says | she hears
                 ,       2      ,           ,          ,           ,
      There's tricks | in the world,| and hems,| and beats | her heart,
         ,    ,                 ,        T      T    .   T
      Spurns env/iously | at straws,| speaks things in doubt,
            ,    2      ,      ,            ,           ,
      That car|ry but half | sense: her | speech is | nothing,
       ,          T   T   T        ,          ,
      Yet the | unshaped use | of it | doth move
            ,       ,       ,          ,     ,    2
      The hear|ers to | collec|tion; they | aim at it,
            ,           ,         ,                ,      ,
      And botch | the words | up fit | to their / own thoughts,
        ,     2        ,            ,          ,           ,
      Which as her | winks, and | nods, and | gestures | yield them,
          ,            ,          ,             ,           ,
      Indeed | would make | one^think | there might | be thought,
              ,         ,          ,       ,     ,
      Though noth|ing sure,| yet much | unhap|pily.
 
GERTRUDE
         T     T   T           ,       ,    oo
      'Twere good she | were spok|en with,|
           ,          ,      ,      ,        ,
      For she | may strew | dange|rous con|jectures
          ,     ,         ___     ,              ,
      In ill-|breeding | minds.| Let her | come in.
        2     ,      ,          T     T   T       ,
      To my sick | soul (as | sin's true na|ture is)
            ,      T    T   T       2       ,        ,
      Each toy | seems prologue,| to some great | amiss,
           ,        ,        ,      ,        ,
      So full | of art|less jeal|ousy | is guilt,
            ,         ,         ,       ,        ,
      It spills | itself,| in fear|ing to | be spilt.
 
[Enter HORATIO with OPHELIA distracted]
 
OPHELIA
        ,     2        ,   2      ,    ,        ,
      Where is the | beauteous | maje|sty of | Denmark.
 
GERTRUDE
           ,       ,  2
      How now | Ophel|ia? \\
 
OPHELIA
       ,           ,          ,         __      ,     ,       ___   oo
      How should | I your | true love^|know | from a|nother | one?|
       ,         ,       ,         ___     ,         ,        ___    oo
      By his | cockle | hat and | staff,| and his | sandal | shoon.|
 
GERTRUDE
        ,            ,       ,        ,            ,
      Alas | sweet* la|dy: what | imports | this song?
 
OPHELIA
           ,           ,          ,
      Say you?| Nay* pray | you mark.  \\
 
Sings
       ,        ,         __     ,      ,        ,         __    oo
      He is | dead and | gone | lady,| he is | dead and | gone,|
       ,         ,        T     T     T     ,         ,        ___    oo
      At his | head a | grass-green turf,| at his | heels a | stone.|
 
GERTRUDE
       ,          ,   2
      Nay but | Ophel|ia.
 
OPHELIA
                           ,          ,    oo
                         Pray | you mark.|
 
[Sings]
        ,            ,     2        ,         __
      White his | shroud as the | mountain | snow.
 
[Enter CLAUDIUS]
 
GERTRUDE
Alas, look here my lord.
 
OPHELIA [Sings]
       ,         T    T      T
      Larded | with sweet flowers:
        ,        ,    2        ,              ,
      Which be|wept to the | grave did | not go,
       __      T    T     T
      With | true-love showers.
 
CLAUDIUS
How do you, pretty lady?
 
OPHELIA
Well, God yield you. They say the owl was a baker's daughter. Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be. God be at your table.
 
CLAUDIUS
Conceit upon her father.
 
OPHELIA
Pray you let's have no words of this: but when they ask you what it means, say you this:
 
[Sings]
         ,       ,          ,     2      ,
      Tomor|row is | Saint Val|entine's^day,
       ,    2       ,     2    __    oo
      All in the | morning be|time,|
          ,       ,         ,        ,
      And I | a maid | at your | window,
          ,         ,      ,    oo
      To be | your Val|entine.|
            ,        ,           ,            ,
      Then up | he rose,| and donned | his clothes,
             ,           ,        ,    oo
      And dupped | the chamb|er-door,|
           ,         ,          ,        ,
      Let in | the maid,| that out | a maid,
       ,         ,        ,    oo
      Never | depart|ed more.|
 
CLAUDIUS
Pretty Ophelia.
 
OPHELIA
Indeed la? Without an oath I'll make an end on it.
 
[Sings]
          ,         ,           ,    ,
      By Gis,| and by | Saint Char|ity,
         ,         ,          ,     oo
      Alack,| and fie | for shame:|
             ,           x          ,           x
      Young men | will do it,| if they | come^to it,
           ,          ,         ,     oo
      By cock | they are | to blame.|
             ,        ,         ,        ,
      Quoth^she | before | you tum|bled me,
            ,        ,       ,    oo
      You prom|ised me | to wed:|
           ,      2       ,        ,       ,
      So would | I have done | by yond|er sun,
           ,          2      ,      2    ,    oo
      And thou | hadst not come | to my bed.|
 
CLAUDIUS
How long hath she been thus?
 
OPHELIA
I hope all will be well. We must be patient, but I cannot choose but weep, to think they should lay him in the cold ground; My brother shall know of it, and so I thank you for your good counsel. Come, my coach: Good night ladies: good night sweet ladies: good night, good night.
 
[Exit]
 
CLAUDIUS
       ,    2        ,
      Follow her | close,
                           ,                 ,         ,
                         Give / her good | watch I | pray you:
 
[Exit HORATIO]
           ,      2     ,             ,    ,           ,
      Oh this | is the pois|on of / deep grief,| it springs
       ,      2       ,           ,         ,          ,
      All from her | father's | death. O | Gertrude,| Gertrude,
            ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      When sor|rows come,| they come | not sing|le spies,
           ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      But in | battal|ions. First,| her fath|er slain,
        T    .    T    T         ,         ,   2    ,      ->
      Next your* son gone,| and he | most vi|olent auth||or
        2       ,    ,        ,         ,       ,       ->
      Of his / own just | remove:| the peo|ple mud||died,
        ,        2    ,     ,    2            ,             ,
      Thick | and unwhole|some in their | thoughts, and | whispers
            ,       ,   2     ,        3  3       ,          ,      2->
      For good | Polon|ius' death;| and we have done | but green||ly
          ,       ,     3  3   ,           ,       ,   3 3->
      In hug|ger-mug|ger to inter | him. Poor | Ophe||lia
         ,       ,         ,       2      ,      ,   
      Divid|ed from | herself,| and her fair | judgment,
           ,          ,       2     ,                ,     ,
      Without | the which | we are pic|tures, or / mere beasts.
        ,              ,        ,             ,    ,
      Last, and | as much | contain|ing as / all these,
           ,        ,       ,        ,            ,
      Her broth|er is | in sec|ret come | from France,
        ,             ,         ,          ,          ,
      Keeps on | his wond|er, keeps | himself | in clouds,
            ,          ,        ,       ,         ,
      And wants | not buz|zers to | infect | his ear
            ,    2       ,       ,         ,         ,
      With pest|ilent speech|es of | his fath|er's death,
        ,    2    ,     ,       ,        ,
      Wherein ne|cessi|ty of | matter | beggared,
            ,         ,          ,       ,       ,
      Will noth|ing stick | our pers|on to | arraign
          ,         ,    ,             ,           ,
      In ear | and ear.| O my | dear* Gert|rude, this,
        ,    2     ,   2       ,          2   ,
      Like to a | murdering-|piece in | many pla|ces,
      <-  ,        2   ,    2      ,
        Gives || me super|fluous death.
 
[A noise within]
 
GERTRUDE
                                        ,           ,          ,
                                     Alack,| what noise | is this?
 
CLAUDIUS
        ,              ,
      Where are | my Swit|zers?  \\
       ,           ,           ,     ,              ,
      Let them | guard the | door. What / is the | matter?
 
[Enter another Gentleman]
 
GENTLEMAN
        ,         ,          ,
      Save your|self, my | lord.  \\
          ,       ,      ,       ,         ,
      The o|cean (ov|erpeer|ing of | his list)
        T   T   .    T            ,       ,    2    ,
      Eats not the flats | with more | impet|uous haste
             ,        ,       ,      ,   2     ,
      Than young | Laert|es, in | a ri|otous head,
           ,           ,     ,         ,        ,           ,  ->
      Orebears | your of|ficers,| The rab|ble call || him lord,
       ,    2        ,           ,       3  3   ,
      And as the | world | were now | but to begin,  ??
         ,     ,       ,     ,             ,
      Anti|quity | forgot,| custom | not^known,
           ,    ,    2      ,         ,       ,
      The rat|ifi|ers and props | of eve|ry word,
            ,       ,           ,       ,          ,
      They cry | choose we?| Laert|es shall | be king,
        T     T     .     T          ,         ,          ,
      Caps, hands, and tongues,| applaud | it to | the clouds,
         ,       ,          ,       ,       ,
      Laert|es shall | be king,| Laert|es king.
 
GERTRUDE
            ,       ,              ,     ,           ,
      How cheer|fully | on the / false trail | they cry,
           ,         ,              ,    ,        ,
      Oh this | is count|er you / false Dan|ish dogs.
 
CLAUDIUS
            ,           ,
      The doors | are broke.  \\
 
[Noise within. Enter LAERTES, armed; Danes following]
 
LAERTES
        ,              ,            ,          ,         ,
      Where is | the king,| sirs? Stand | you all | without.
 
DANES
      __     ,          __
      No,| let's come | in.   \\
 
LAERTES
          ,          ,         ,
      I pray | you give | me leave.
 
DANES
                                         ,        ,
                                    We will, we will.
 
[They retire without the door]
 
LAERTES
          ,            ,          ,
      I thank | you: keep | the door.  \\
      T   T    T      ,     ,             ,
      O thou vile | king, give / me my | father.
 
GERTRUDE
      ,              ,
     Calmly,| good Laert|es.
 
LAERTES
                                   ,         ,              ,
                            That drop | of blood,| that's calm
            ,          ,
      Proclaims | me bast|ard:  \\
        ,     ,        2      ,          ,          ,
      Cries cuck/old to my | father,| brands the | harlot
        2    ,        ,            ,           ,       ,
      Even here | between | the chaste | unsmirch|ed brow
        2     ,     ,
      Of my true | mother.
 
CLAUDIUS
                             ,    2        ,       ,
                           What is the | cause La|ertes,
            ,       ,         ,         ,       ,
      That thy | rebel|lion looks | so gi|ant-like?
         2     ,    ,          ,         ,         ,
      Let him go | Gertrude:| do not | fear our | person:
                ,       ,    ,          ,         ,
      There's such | divin|ity | doth^hedge | a king,
             ,       ,          ,         ,         ,
      That treas|on can | but peep | to what | it would,
            ,       ,         ,      ,    2    ,
      Acts lit|tle of | his will.| Tell me La|ertes,
       ,               ,         ,        2     ,    ,
      Why thou | art thus | incensed?| Let him go | Gertrude.
        T    T
      Speak man.
 
LAERTES
                   T            ,
                 Where's | my fath|er?
 
CLAUDIUS
                                            __    oo
                                           Dead.|
 
GERTRUDE
           ,        ,
      But not | by him.
 
CLAUDIUS
                        ,            ,          ,
                       Let him | demand | his fill.
 
LAERTES
            ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      How came | he dead?| I'll not | be jug|gled with.
           ,       ,           ,      2      ,         x
      To hell | alleg|iance: vows,| to the black|est devil.
       ,                 ,      ,            ,        ,
      Conscience | and grace,| to the | profound|est pit.
          ,        ,        ,          ,         ,
      I dare | damna|tion: To | this point | I stand,
             ,           ,         ,        ,      ,
      That both | the worlds | I give | to neg|ligence,
            ,           ,      ,           ,        ,
      Let come | what comes:| only | I'll be | revenged
             ,     2    ,        ,
      Most^thor|oughly for | my fath|er.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                          ,            ,         2->
                                         Who | shall stay || you?
 
LAERTES
           ,         ,          ,
      My will,| not all | the world:  \\
           ,         ,           ,         ,         ,
      And for | my means,| I'll hus|band them | so well,
        ,       2      ,          ,
      They shall go | far with | little.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                            ,      ,
                                          Good La|ertes:
          ,        ,         ,          ,      ,
      If you | desire | to know | the cert|ainty
                  ,    ,         ,          ,      3    3    ,
      Of your / dear fath|er's death,| if writ | in your revenge,
             ,     ,                ,            ,          ,
      That swoop|stake you | will draw | both friend | and foe,
       ,    2       ,
      Winner and | loser.  \\
 
LAERTES
        ,     2       ,    ,
      None but his | ene|mies.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                  2      ,           ,
                              Will you know | them then.
 
LAERTES
                 ,     ,             ,          ,         ,
      To his / good friends,| thus wide | I'll ope | my arms:
            ,     .    T    T    T    2    ,      x  
      And like | the kind life-rend|ering pol|itician,  ??
          ,           ,         ,
      Repast | them with | my blood.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                         ,          ,
                                    Why now | you speak
        T  .   T    T               ,   ,      ,
      Like a good child,| and a / true gent|leman.
           ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      That I | am guilt|less of | your fath|er's death,
           ,         ,     ,         ,      ,
      And am | most sens|ible | in grief | for it,
           ,         ,      ,          ,          ,
      It shall | as lev|el to | your judg|ment pierce
          ,      ,             ,
      As day | does to | your eye.
 
DANES [Within]
                                   ,              ,
                                  Let her | come in.
 
[Enter OPHELIA]
 
LAERTES
           ,           ,          ,    oo
      How now?| What noise | is that?|
      <-    ,          ,         ,       T     Tx    T      __
        O heat || dry up | my brains,| tears seven times | salt,  ??
            ,          ,          ,       ,         ,
      Burn^out | the sense | and vir|tue of | mine^eye.
           x           ,         ,          ,          ,
      By heaven,| thy mad|ness shall | be paid | by weight,
                   ,     ,          ,        ,        ,
      Till our / scale turn | the beam.| O rose | of May,
        T    T     T     ,         ,      ,  2
      Dear maid, kind | sister,| sweet O|phelia:
           x        2    ,     ,    .   T     T      T
      O heavens,| is it pos|sible,| a young maid's wits,
              ,       ,      ,    .  T    T     T
      Should be | as mor|al as | an old man's life?
       ,            ,         ,          ,            ,
      Nature | is fine | in love,| and where | 'tis fine,
           ,           ,         ,         ,       ,
      It sends | some pre|cious inst|ance of | itself
       ,            ,          ,
      After | the thing | it loves.  \\
 
OPHELIA [Sings]
             ,          ,         ,         ,    oo
      They bore | him bare|faced on | the bier,|
       ,          Tx     Tx    T     ,      oo
      Hey non | nonny, nonny, hey | nonny:|
           ,         ,             ,   2    ,    oo
      And in | his grave | rained^ma|ny a tear,|
       __    ___    __         ,    oo
      Fare | you | well | my dove.|
 
LAERTES
Hadst thou thy wits, and didst persuade revenge, it could not move thus.
 
OPHELIA
You must sing a-down a-down, and you call him a-down-a. Oh, how the wheel becomes it? It is the false steward that stole his master's daughter.
 
LAERTES
This nothing's more than matter.
 
OPHELIA
There's rosemary, that's for remembrance. Pray love remember: and there is pansies, that's for thoughts.
 
LAERTES
A document in madness, thoughts and remembrance fitted.
 
OPHELIA
There's fennel for you, and columbines: there's rue for you, and here's some for me. We may call it herb-grace of Sundays: Oh you must wear your rue with a difference. There's a daisy, I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died: they say, he made a good end;
 
[Sings]
           ,              ,         ___      ___
      For bonny | sweet* Robin | is all | my joy.  (amphibrach)
 
LAERTES
         ,              ,         ,          ,        ,
      Thought and | afflic|tion, pas|sion, hell | itself:
            ,         ,       ,         ,      ,
      She turns | to fav|or, and | to pret|tiness.
 
OPHELIA [Sings]
       ,             ,          __    oo
      And will he | not come a|gain,|
       ,             ,          __    oo
      And will he | not come a|gain:|
       ,   ,           ,
      No, no,| he is dead,
       ,  ,              ,
      Go to | thy death^bed,
       ,           ,          __    oo
      He never | will come a|gain.|
            ,          ,          ,    oo
      His beard | as white | as snow,|
            ,      ,          ,    oo
      All flax|en was | his poll:|
              ,            ,
      He is gone,| he is gone,
               ,           ,
      And we cast | away moan,
          ,      ,         ,    oo
      Gramer|cy on | his soul.|
 
           ,         ,          ,         ,    ___
      And of | all Chris|tian souls,| I pray | God.
       ,             ,
      God be | with ye.
 
[Exit]
 
LAERTES
                        ,        ,               ,
                       Do you | see this,| you gods?
 
CLAUDIUS
         ,      ,     ,        ,                ,
      Laert|es, I | must com|mune with | your grief,
          ,       ,        ,      ,         ,
      Or you | deny | me right:| Go but^|apart,
              ,          ,          ,         ,            ,
      Make^choice | of whom | your wis|est friends | you will,
            ,            ,          ,        T    T   .   T
      And they | shall hear | and judge | 'twixt you and me;
          ,       ,        ,       ,   2     ,
      If by | direct | or by | collat|eral hand
             ,          ,           ,          ,        ,
      They find | us touched,| we will | our king|dom give,
            ,           ,         ,          ,         ,
      Our crown,| our life,| and all | that we | can ours
          ,        ,     ,         ,        ,
      To you | in sat|isfac|tion. But | if not,
          ,         ,         ,          ,          x
      Be you | content | to lend | your pa|tience to us,
           ,           ,       ,        ,           ,
      And we | shall joint|ly lab|or with | your soul
           ,        ,         ,
      To give | it due | content.
 
LAERTES
                                       ,        ,
                                 Let^this | be so:
            ,          ,      ,       ,    ,
      His means | of death,| his ob|scure bur/ial;
           ,        ,           ,         ,          ,
      No troph|y, sword,| nor hatch|ment ore | his bones,
           x       ,           ,       ,     ,
      No noble | rite, nor | formal | osten|tation,
       ,            ,           ,             x          ,
      Cry to | be heard,| as 'twere | from heaven | to earth,
           ,          ,         ,
      That I | must call | in ques|tion.
 
CLAUDIUS
                                         ,         ,
                                        So | you shall:
            ,        2    ,      ,     2        T    T    T
      And where | the offense | is, let the | great axe fall.
          ,         ,         ,
      I pray | you go | with me.   \\
 
[Exeunt]

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