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Hamlet

Act I, Scene 2

A room of state in the castle.
 
[Enter CLAUDIUS, GERTRUDE, HAMLET, POLONIUS, LAERTES, VOLTIMAND, CORNELIUS, Lords, and Attendants]
 
CLAUDIUS
              ,        ,              ,   ,           ,
      Though yet | of Ham|let our / dear broth|er's death
           ,   3 3     ,      ,      2      ,     ,
      The mem|ory be green,| and that it | us be|fitted
           ,           ,          ,        2      ,       ,
      To bear | our hearts | in grief,| and our whole | kingdom
          ,        ,            ,    ,        ,
      To be | contract|ed in / one brow | of woe:
            ,    ,      2     ,           ,           ,
      Yet* so | far hath di|scretion | fought with | nature,
            ,         ,       ,        ,         ,
      That we | with wis|est sor|row think | on him,
         ,        ,       ,          ,         ,
      Togeth|er with | remem|brance of | ourselves.
            ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      Therefore | our some|time sis|ter, now | our queen,
         2   ,   2    ,                    ,   ,    ,
      The imper|ial joint|ress to this // warlike state,
            ,    T    T      T     2   ,       ,
      Have we,| as 'twere, with | a defea|ted joy,
        ,    2    ,          ,        ,         ,
      With an au|spicious,| and a | dropping | eye,
      <-          ,         ,  2      ,           ,         ,
        With || mirth in | funeral | and with | dirge in | marriage,
         ,        ,       ,            ,           ,
      In e|qual scale | weighing | delight | and dole
       ,           ,          ,         ,       ,
      Taken | to wife:| nor have | we here|in barred
            ,       ,          ,            ,       ,
      Your bet|ter wis|doms, which | have free|ly gone
             ,        ,       ,         ,           ,
      With this | affair | along,| for all | our thanks.
       ,   ,            2        T    T    T       ,
      Now fol/lows, that you | know young Fort|inbras,
       ,            ,        ,      ,         ,
      Holding | a weak | suppos|al of | our worth;
           ,                   ,    ,    ,          ,
      Or think|ing by our // late dear broth|er's death,
            ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      Our state | to be | disjoint,| and out | of frame,
       ,     ,                  ,         ,      ,
      Colleagued / with the | dream of | his ad|vantage;
        2      ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
      He hath not |  failed to | pester | us with | message,
       , ,                  ,      ,           ,
      Impor/ting the | surrend|er of | those lands
        ,             ,              ,    ,         ,
      Lost by | his fath|er: with / all bonds | of law
        2      ,     ,  2      ,             ,         ,
      To our most | valiant | brother.| So much | for him.
       ,     2      ,          ,           ,        ,
      Now for our|self, and | for this | time of | meeting
             ,         ,         ,               ,    ,
      Thus^much | the bus|iness is.| We have / here writ
          ,        ,            ,    ,       ,
      To Nor|way, unc|le of / young Fort|inbras,
           ,     ,         ,           ,        ,
      Who imp|otent | and bed-|rid, scarce|ly hears
           ,          ,        ,         ,        ,
      Of this | his neph|ew's pur|pose, to | suppress
            ,        ,         ,    ,     2       ,
      His furth|er gait | herein.| in that the | levies,
            ,           ,        ,               ,    ,
      The lists,| and full | propor|tions are / all made
       ,            ,    ,              ,         ,
      Out of | his sub|ject: and | we here | dispatch
       ,              ,   2          ,    ,     ,
      You, good*| Corne|lius, and / you Volt|imand,
            ,       ,          ,      2    ,     ,
      For bear|ing of | this greet|ing to old | Norway,
       ,           ,         ,        ,   2     x
      Giving | to you | no furth|er pers|onal power
          ,          ,          ,      ,               ,
      To bus|iness with | the king,| more than | the scope
           ,        ,      ,     ,       ,
      Of these | delat|ed art|icles | allow.
            ,         ,           ,          ,          ,     2->
      Farewell | and let | your haste | commend | your du||ty.
 
VOLTIMAND
           ,         ,       ,        2       ,         ,
      In that,| and all | things, will we | show our | duty.
 
CLAUDIUS
           ,         ,          ,     ,         ,
      We doubt | it noth|ing, heart|ily | farewell.
 
[Exeunt VOLTIMAND and CORNELIUS]
           ,      ,          ,           ,          ,
      And now | Laer|tes, what's | the news | with you?
            ,      2     ,      ,            x       ,
      You told | us of some | suit. What | is it La|ertes?
           ,        ,          ,      ,         ,
      You can|not speak | of reas|on to | the Dane,
            ,           ,             ,            ,      x
      And lose | your voice.| What wouldst | thou beg | Laertes,
          2       ,     ,       ,       ,         ,
      That shall not | be my | offer,| not thy | asking?
            ,        ,          ,       ,         ,
      The head | is not | more nat|ive to | the heart,
            ,           ,      ,      ,         ,
      The hand | more inst|rument|al to | the mouth,
        ,    2         ,         ,         ,        ,
      Than is the | throne of | Denmark | to thy | father.
              ,             ,       ,
      What wouldst | thou have,| Laer|tes?
 
LAERTES
                                                   ,     ,
                                            My / dread lord,
             ,          ,      ,       ,          ,
      Your leave | and fav|or to | return | to France,
              ,             ,       ,       ,        ,        2->
      From whence,| though wil|lingly | I came | to Den||mark*
           ,        ,   3  3      ,    ,    ,
      To show | my du|ty in your cor|ona|tion,
           ,        ,         ,          ,      ,
      Yet now | I must | confess,| that du|ty done,
             ,            ,       ,       ,              ,
      My thoughts | and wish|es bend | again | toward France,
           ,      ,    2        ,           ,          ,
      And bow | them to your | gracious | leave and | pardon.
 
CLAUDIUS
        ,     2        ,           ,
      Have you your | father's | leave?
                                                  ,      ,  2
                                         What | says Po|lonius?
 
POLONIUS
           ,         ,      ,                   ,    ,
      He hath | my lord | wrung from^|me my / slow leave
          ,      ,       ,        ,         ,
      By lab|orsome | peti|tion, and | at last
        ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      Upon | his will |I sealed | my hard | consent:
         ,       ,           ,          ,         ,
      I do | beseech | you give | him leave | to go.
 
CLAUDIUS
        ,               ,      ,         ,          ,
      Take thy | fair^hour | Laer|tes, time | be thine,
                  ,   ,        ,         ,         ,
      And thy / best gra|ces spend | it at | thy will:
           ,         ,      ,        ,        ,
      But now | my cous|in Ham|let, and | my son?
 
HAMLET
         ,        ,          ,          ,           ,
      A lit|tle more | than kin,| and less | than kind.
 
CLAUDIUS
           ,        ,     .     T     T     T        ,
      How is | it that | the clouds still hang | on you?
 
HAMLET
           ,        ,            ,    ,      2     ,
      Not so | my lord,| I am / too much | in the sun.
 
GERTRUDE
            ,        ,          ,       ,      ,
      Good Ham|let cast | thy night|ed col|or off,
           ,           ,      ,      2       ,         ,
      And let | thine^eye | look like a | friend on | Denmark.
          ,         ,      ,          ,       ,
      Do not | for ev|er with | thy vail|ed lids
        ,             ,       ,      ,         ,
      Seek for | thy nob|le fath|er in | the dust;
              ,           ,        ,           ,           ,
      Thou knowst | 'tis com|mon, all | that lives | must die,
       ,                 ,        ,      ,    ,
      Passing | through nat|ure, to | etern|ity.
 
HAMLET
       ,   ,               ,
      Aye mad/am, it | is com|mon.
 
GERTRUDE
                                    ,       ,
                                   If | it be;
            ,         ,       ,    ,           ,
      Why seems | it so | partic|ular | with thee.
 
HAMLET
        T     Tx    T        ,   .   T   T    T
      Seems madam? Nay,| it is:| I know not seems:
        ,     2    ,        ,       ,            ,
      'Tis not a|lone my | inky | cloak (good*| mother)
            ,    ,      ,         ,        ,
      Nor cust|oma|ry suits | of sol|emn black,
           ,      ,     ,              ,      ,
      Nor wind|y sus|pira|tion of / forced breath,
       ,              ,        ,      ,        ,
      No, nor | the fruit|ful riv|er in | the eye,
       ,     2     ,   2    ,        ,        ,
      Nor the de|jected be|havior | of the | visage,
          ,    2      ,      T      T       T          ,
      Togeth|er with all | forms, moods, shapes | of grief,
        ,     2     ,        ,                 ,    ,
      That can de|note me | truly.| these in/deed seem,
            ,         ,         ,       ,            ,
      For they | are ac|tions that | a man | might play:
          ,          ,         ,          ,         ,
      But I | have that | within | which pas|seth show;
        ,                ,          ,          ,         ,
      These, but | the trap|pings, and | the suits | of woe.
 
CLAUDIUS
             ,        2    ,     ,
      'Tis sweet | and commen|dable
                                     ,         ,        ,
                                    In your | nature,| Hamlet,
           ,            ,        ,       ,         ,       o
      To give | these mourn|ing dut|ies to | your fath|er:    (hex with prev)
           ,      T    T     T     ,        ,        ,
      But you | must know, your | father | lost a | father,
             ,       ,          ,     ,            ,       ,
      That fath|er lost,| lost his,| and the | survi|vor bound (hex with prev)
          ,   2   ,    ,               ,    ,
      In fil|ial ob|liga|tion, for / some term
          ,      ,   2     ,        ,      2    ,     2->
      To do | obse|quious sor|row. But | to persev||er
          ,      ,         ,         ,        ,
      In obs|tinate | condole|ment, is | a course
          ,   2     ,        ,        2   ,       ,
      Of imp|ious stub|bornness.| 'Tis unman|ly grief,
           ,         ,          ,      ,          x
      It shows | a will | most^in|correct | to heaven,
          ,         ,      ,        ,      ,       2->
      A heart | unfort|ified,| a mind | impa||tient,  ??
          ,      ,         ,             ,    ,
      An und|erstand|ing simp|le, and / unschooled:
       ,               ,          ,        ,       ,      2->
      For, what | we know | must be,| and is | as com||mon
         ,            ,   ,        ,          ,
      As an|y the / most vul|gar thing | to sense,
             ,         ,        ,        ,    ,      ->
      Why should | we in | our peev|ish op|posi||tion
        ,      2     ,      ,              ,           x
      Take | it to heart?| Fie, 'tis | a fault | to heaven,
          ,         ,           ,        ,         ,      2->
      A fault | against | the dead,| a fault | to na||ture,  ??
           ,       ,        ,           ,        ,
      To reas|on most | absurd,| whose com|mon theme
           ,         ,         ,          ,            ,
      Is death | of fath|ers, and | who still | hath cried,
                   ,     ,           ,          ,       ,
      From the / first corse,| till he | that died | today,
             ,        ,        ,          ,          ,
      This must | be so.| We pray | you throw | to earth
            ,     ,        ,          ,         ,
      This un|prevail|ing woe,| and think | of us
          ,       ,       ,       2      ,            ,
      As of | a fath|er; for | let the world | take^note,
           ,          ,       ,   2    ,          ,
      You are | the most | immed|iate to | our throne,
            ,         ,       ,    ,        ,
      And with | no less | nobil|ity | of love,
             ,            ,        ,       ,          ,
      Than that | which dear|est fath|er bears | his son,
         ,       ,            ,          ,        ,
      Do I | impart | toward^you.| For your | intent
          ,       ,          ,         ,       ,
      In go|ing back | to school | in Wit|tenberg,
          ,         ,      ,         ,        ,
      It is | most ret|rograde | to our | desire:
           ,       ,            ,         ,       ,
      And we | beseech | you, bend | you to | remain
        ,             ,          ,        ,        ,
      Here in | the cheer | and com|fort of | our^eye,
            ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Our chief|est court|ier cous|in, and | our son.
 
GERTRUDE
           ,         ,        ,           ,       ,
      Let not | thy moth|er lose | her prayers | Hamlet:
          ,        ,          ,    ,    2      ,   2
      I prith|ee stay | with us,| go not^to | Wittenberg.
 
HAMLET
          ,         ,         ,
      I shall | in all | my best
                                   ,          x
                                 Obey | you madam.
 
CLAUDIUS
             ,       ,        ,        ,       ,
      Why* 'tis | a lov|ing, and | a fair | reply,
          ,        ,        ,         ,       ,
      Be as | ourself | in Den|mark. mad|am come,
            ,     2     ,    ,        ,        ,
      This gent|le and un|forced ac|cord of | Hamlet
        ,    ,                ,          ,           ,
      Sits smil/ing to | my heart;| in grace | whereof,
          ,         ,           ,          ,        ,
      No joc|und health | that Den|mark drinks | today,
                  ,    ,       ,          ,             ,
      But the / great can|non to | the clouds | shall tell,
                  ,      ,          ,                 ,     ,
      And the / king's rouse,| the heav|ens shall / bruit again,
           ,         ,        ,         ,       ,
      Re-speak|ing earth|ly thund|er. Come | away.
 
[Exeunt all but HAMLET]
 
HAMLET
       ,     2        T   T   T       ,             ,
      Oh that this | too too so|lid flesh,| would melt,
        ,             ,         ,     ,        ,
      Thaw, and | resolve | itself | into | a dew:
       ,             ,    ,              ,    ,
      Or that | the Ev|erlast|ing had / not fixed
            x          ,       ,     ,            ,         ,  ->
      His canon | against | self-slaugh/ter. O | God, O || God!
             ,       ,      ,             , 3  3
      How^|weary,| stale, flat,/ and un|profitable
        ,           ,         ,     ,          ,
      Seem to | me all | the us|es of | this^world?
       ,    2         ,     ,            2   ,         x
      Fie on it?| Oh fie,| fie, 'tis | an unwee|ded garden
             ,          ,       T     T    .    T         ,      2->
      That grows | to seed:| things rank, and gross | in na||ture
           ,         ,        ,      2         ,         ,
      Possess | it mere|ly. That | it should come | to this:
       .   T     T     T     ,              ,         ,
      But two months dead:| nay, not | so much,| not^two,
          ,      ,        ,          ,         ,
      So ex|cellent | a king,| that was | to this
         ,    ,     2    x         ,       ,        ,     ->   
      Hype|rion | to a satyr:| so lov|ing to | my moth||er,
        ,      2       ,        ,          ,           x
      That | he might not | beteem | the winds | of heaven
       ,            ,          ,          x           ,
      Visit | her face | too rough|ly. Heaven | and earth
           ,      ,        ,       2        ,        ,
      Must^I | remem|ber: why | she would hang | on him,
          ,        ,         ,     ,          ,
      As if | increase | of ap|petite | had grown
       ,     2      ,            ,        ,        ,
      By what it | fed on;| and yet | within | a month?
       ,    2        ,     2       ,     2        ,        ,
      Let me not | think on it:| Frailty, thy | name is | woman.
         ,        ,         ,            ,           ,
      A lit|tle month,| or ere | those shoes | were old,
             ,          ,       2     ,     ,          ,
      With which | she fol|lowed my poor | father's | body,
            x   T   T    T           ,      2   ,
      Like Nio|be, all tears. | Why she,| even she.
            x         ,            ,          ,           x
      (O Heaven!| A beast | that wants | discourse | of reason
           2        ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      Would have mourned | longer)| married | with mine | uncle,
           ,         ,          2       ,    ,        ,      2->
      My fath|er's broth|er: but no / more like | my fath||er
           ,       ,     ,        ,        ,
      Than I | to Her|cules:| within | a month?
           ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      Ere yet | the salt | of most | unright|eous tears
            ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      Had left | the flush|ing in | her gal|led eyes,
           ,        ,          ,       ,          ,
      She mar|ried. O | most^wick|ed speed,| to post
             ,        ,    ,     2   ,    2      ,
      With such | dexter|ity | to inces|tuous sheets:
          ,    ,             ,        ,         ,
      It is | not, nor | it can|not come | to good.
            ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
      But break | my heart,| for I | must hold | my tongue.
 
[Enter HORATIO, MARCELLUS, and BERNARDO]
 
HORATIO
        ,              ,
      Hail to | your lord|ship.
 
HAMLET
                                2     ,        ,          ,
                               I am glad | to see | you well:
         ,  2    ,      ,       ,        ,
      Hora|tio, or | I do | forget | myself.
 
HORATIO
            ,         ,
      The same | my lord,
                              2       ,     ,         ,
                           And your poor | servant | ever.
 
HAMLET
       ,                ,
      Sir my | good* friend,
                                     ,            ,          ,
                             I'll change | that name | with you:
            ,      ,              ,       ,       ,    , ->
      And what | make you | from Wit|tenberg | Hora||tio?
           ,
      Mar|cellus.
 
MARCELLUS
                        ,      ,
                   My good | lord.
 
HAMLET
      <- ,         ,       ,        ,             ,       ,
         I am | | very | glad to | see you:| Good^ev|en sir.
            ,         ,           ,          ,       ,
      But what | in faith | make^you | from Wit|tenberg?
 
HORATIO
         ,       ,     ,         ,         ,
      A tru|ant dis|posi|tion, good | my lord.
 
HAMLET
          ,           ,          ,        ,   ,
      I would | not hear | your en|emy / say so;
                   ,   ,         ,          ,    ,
      Nor shall / you do | mine^ear | that vi|olence,
           ,         ,       ,         ,        ,
      To make | it trust|er of | your own | report
          ,           ,        ,       2     ,    ,
      Against | yourself.| I know | you are no | truant:
            ,         ,        ,        ,     ,
      But what | is your | affair | in Els|inore?
              ,        2     ,       ,    ,             ,
      We'll teach | you to drink | deep, ere / you de|part.
 
HORATIO
      <-        ,         ,        ,          ,          ,  2
        My || lord, I | came to | see your | father's | funeral.
 
HAMLET
          ,      ,    2        ,        ,        ,
      I pray | thee do not | mock me |(fellow | student)
          ,         ,        ,        ,         ,        2->
      I think | it was | to see | my moth|er's wed||ding.
 
HORATIO
          ,         ,        ,          ,      ,
      Indeed | my lord,| it fol|lowed hard | upon.
 
HAMLET
         T       T    . T   ,        ,           ,     ,
      Thrift, thrift Hora|tio:| the fun|eral / baked meats
            ,       ,        ,          ,         ,      o
      Did cold|ly furn|ish forth | the mar|riage tab|les,  (hex with prev)
        ,            ,         ,       ,          x
      Would I | had met | my dear|est foe | in heaven,
       ,   2      ,        ,          ,      , 2
      Ere I had | ever | seen that | day Ho|ratio.
       ,  ,             ,        ,        ,
      My fath/er, me|thinks I | see my | father.
 
HORATIO
        ,           ,
      Where, my | lord?
 
HAMLET
                                 ,       ,       , 2
                       In | my mind's | eye (Ho|ratio).
 
HORATIO
         ,          ,     ,           ,       ,
      I saw | him once;| he was | a good|ly king.
 
HAMLET
       ,          ,      ,             ,        ,
      He was | a man,| take him | for all | in all:
          ,           ,      ,          ,       ,
      I shall | not look | upon | his like | again.
 
HORATIO
           ,        ,        ,          ,      ,
      My lord,| I think | I saw | him yest|ernight.
 
HAMLET
      ___     ,
      Saw? | Who?
 
HORATIO
                         ,           ,          ,
                  My | lord, the | king your | father.
 
HAMLET
            ,        ,
      The king | my fath|er?
 
HORATIO
                             ,     2      ,    ,      3   3    ,  ->
                            seas|on your ad|mira||tion for a while
          2        ,   ,      ,       ,      ,
      With an at/tent ear,| till I | may de|liver
        ,         ,              ,    ,      ,
      Upon | the wit|ness of / these gent|lemen,
            ,       ,
      This marv|el to | you.
 
HAMLET
                                      x       ,       2     ,
                             For / Heaven's love | let me hear.
 
HORATIO
             ,         ,       ,            ,     ,
      Two nights | togeth|er, had | these gent|lemen
           ,       ,        ,       ,           ,
      (Marcel|lus and | Bernar|do) on | their watch
                 ,    ,         ,       ,         ,
      In the / dead vast | and mid|dle of | the night
        ,      2     ,            ,        ,           ,     ->
      Been thus en|countered.| A fig|ure like | your fath||er,
        ,          ,        ,       ,      ,
      Armed | at point | exact|ly, cap-|a-pe,
          ,         ,           ,          ,        ,
      Appears | before | them, and | with sol|emn march
             ,          ,        ,           ,           ,
      Goes^slow | and state|ly: by | them thrice | he walked,
       ,              ,            ,        ,       ,
      By their | oppressed | and fear-|surpris|ed eyes,
          ,           ,            ,              ,         ,
      Within | his trunch|eon's length;| whilst^they | distilled
       ,           ,       ,         ,         ,
      Almost | to jel|ly with | the act | of fear,
              ,          ,      ,              ,        ,
      Stand^dumb | and speak | not to | him. This | to me
           ,        ,     ,       ,          ,
      In dread|ful sec|recy | impart | they did,
          ,     ,      2        T     T     T          ,
      And I | with them the | third night kept | the watch,
           ,          ,       ,         ,         ,
      Whereas | they had | deliv|ered both | in time,
        ,             ,            ,           ,          ,
      Form of | the thing;| each word | made^true | and good,
           ,    ,        ,         ,          ,       ->
      The ap|pari|tion comes.| I knew | your fath||er:
        ,       ,          ,           ,
      These | hands are | not more*| like.
 
HAMLET
                                             2         ,
                                          But where | was this?
 
MARCELLUS
           ,      ,          ,         ,           ,
      My lord | upon | the plat|form where | we watched.
 
HAMLET
       ,              ,      ,  
      Did you | not speak | to it?
 
HORATIO
                                       ,       ,
                                  My lord,| I did;
           ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
      But ans|wer made | it none:| yet once | methought
          ,       ,         ,         ,        ,
      It lift|ed up | its head,| and did | address
          ,        ,         ,        ,           ,
      Itself | to mo|tion, like | as it | would speak:
            ,      ,          ,          T    T    T
      But eene | then, the | morning | cock crew loud;
           ,         ,           ,          ,        ,
      And at | the sound | it shrunk | in haste | away,
           ,          ,          ,
      And van|ished from | our sight.
 
HAMLET
                                           ,       ,
                                     'Tis ve|ry strange.
 
HORATIO
         ,        ,        ,         ,           ,
      As I | do live | my hon|ored lord | 'tis true;
           ,         ,          ,      ,    2       ,
      And we | did think | it writ | down in our | duty
          ,          ,        ,
      To let | you know | of it.  \\
 
HAMLET
          ,        ,      ,                ,        ,
      Indeed,| indeed | sirs; but | this troub|les me.
        ,              ,         ,
      Hold you | the watch | tonight?
 
MARCELLUS BERNARDO
                                           ,        ,
                                       We do | my lord.
 
HAMLET
        T     T   T
      Armed, say you?
 
MARCELLUS BERNARDO
        T     T   T
      Armed, my lord.  (di with prev)
 
HAMLET
            ,        ,
      From top | to toe?
 
MARCELLUS and BERNARDO
                              ,           ,         ,
                         My lord,| from head | to foot.
 
HAMLET
            ,         ,          ,
      Then saw | you not | his face?  \\
 
HORATIO
         ,         ,         ,          ,      ,
      O yes,| my lord,| he wore | his beav|er up.
 
HAMLET
        T      T    .   T       ,
      What, looked he frown|ingly?  \\
 
HORATIO
           ,           ,        ,        ,        ,     ->
      A counte|nance more | in sor|row than | in ang||er.
 
HAMLET
        ,       ,
      Pale, or red?  \\
 
HORATIO
            ,      ,
      Nay* ve|ry pale.
 
HAMLET
                            ,           ,      ,         ->
                      And fixed | his eyes | upon || you?
 
HORATIO
        ,     ,         2
      Most | constant|ly.
 
HAMLET
                              ,               ,    ,
                          I would | I had / been there.
 
HORATIO
           ,            ,       ,          ->
      It would | have much | amazed || you.   ????
 
HAMLET
        ,      ,             ,      ,          ,
       Ve|ry like,| very / like: stayed | it long?
 
HORATIO
             ,          ,    2     ,             ,     x
      While one | with mod|erate haste | might tell | a hundred.
 
MARCELLUS BERNARDO
       ,       ,
      Longer, longer.  \\
 
HORATIO
       ,         ,    2
      Not when | I saw it.
 
HAMLET
                                ,           ,         ,
                          His beard | was griz|zled? No.
 
HORATIO
          ,       ,          ,        ,         ,
      It was,| as I | have seen | it in | his life,
         ,       ,
      A sab|le silv|ered.  \\
 
HAMLET
       2       ,         ,           ,             ,       ,
      I will watch | tonight;| perchance |'twill walk | again.
 
HORATIO
         ,      2     ,
      I war|rant it will.  \\
 
HAMLET
       ,   2     ,        ,       ,          ,
      If it as|sume my | noble | father's | person,
             ,         ,            ,        ,             ,
      I'll speak | to it,| though hell | itself | should gape
           ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      And bid | me hold | my peace.| I pray | you all,
          ,           ,     ,         ,            ,
      If you | have hith|erto | concealed | this sight;
       ,           ,    2   ,         ,         ,
      Let it | be ten|able in | your sil|ence still:
            ,     ,      ,           ,        ,
      And what|soev|er else | shall hap | tonight,
        ,           ,      ,              ,    ,
      Give it | an und|erstand|ing but / no tongue;
          ,        ,            ,            ,          ,
      I will | requite | your loves;| So*, fare | you well:
        ,          ,    T      T   . T    2       ,
      Upon | the plat|form, 'twixt elev|en and twelve,
             x      ,
      I'll visit | you.
 
ALL
                              ,      ,         ,
                       Our | duty | to your | honor.
 
[Exeunt all but HAMLET]
 
HAMLET
             ,         ,        ,     __   __
      Your love,| as mine | to you:| fare|well.
          ,           x          ,      T   .  T    T
      My fath|er's spirit | in arms? | All is not well:
          ,            ,      ,                 ,            ,
      I doubt | some foul | play: would | the night | were come;
        ,      2        ,          T     T    T            ,
      Till then sit | still my | soul; foul deeds | will rise,
              ,          ,          ,                 ,     ,
      Though all | the earth | orewhelm | them to / men's eyes.
 
[Exit]

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