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Coriolanus

Act V, Scene 3

The tent of Coriolanus.
 
[Enter CORIOLANUS, AUFIDIUS, and others]
 
CORIOLANUS
           ,        ,          ,          ,       ,      2->
      We will | before | the walls | of Rome | tomor||row
            ,          ,         ,   ,    2        ,
      Set^down | our host.| My part|ner in this | action,
       ,      2     ,    2       ,           ,            ,
      You must re|port to the | Volscian | lords, how | plainly
      ,          ,           ,
      I have | borne this | business.
 
AUFIDIUS
      <-  ,             ,           ,        ,     ->
         Only | their ends || you have | respec|ted,
         ,             ,        ,           ,   2     ,         ,
      Stopped | your ears | against || the gen|eral suit | of Rome:
       ,   2    ,    2      ,          ,        T  T    T            ,
      Never ad|mitted a || private | whisper,| no not with | such^friends
              ,             ,        ,
      That thought | them sure | of you.
 
CORIOLANUS
                                                ,         ,
                                         This last | old^man,
        ,              ,        ,              ,         ,
      Whom with | a cracked | heart I | have sent | to Rome,
        ,           ,         ,    ,    2     ,
      Loved me,| above | the mea|sure of a | father,
            ,     3  3    ,           ,       ,   ,
      Nay* god|ded me^indeed.| Their la|test re|fuge
      <-            ,                 ,    ,      T  T   T
        Was || to send | him; for / whose old | love I have
          ,          ,     ,                 ,          ,       2->
      (Though I | showed sour/ly to | him) once | more^of||fered
            ,         ,         ,           ,        ,
      The first | condi|tions which | they did | refuse
         2    ,     ,       ,          ,          ,
      And cannot | now ac|cept, to | grace him | only,
              ,           ,          ,       ,       x
      That thought | he could | do more:| a ve|ry little
       2       ,       ,          ,      ,          ,
      I have yiel|ded to:| fresh^em|bassies | and suits,
       ,      2        ,           ,           ,           ,
      Nor from the | state, nor | private | friends, here|after
           ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Will I | lend ear | to. Ha?| What shout | is this?
            ,        ,       ,        ,         ,
      Shall I | be temp|ted to | infringe | my vow
                 ,    ,          ,    T   T   T
      In the / same time |'tis made?| I will not.
 
[Enter in mourning habits, VIRGILIA, VOLUMNIA, leading young MARTIUS, VALERIA, and Attendants]
           ,      T     T   T        2     ,         ,
      My wife | comes foremost,| then the ho|nored mold
            ,          ,            ,          ,         ,
      Wherein | this trunk | was framed,| and in | her hand
            ,     ,     2        ,           ,      ,
      The grand|child to her | blood. But | out af|fection,
            ,         ,      ,        ,        ,
      All bond | and pri|vilege | of na|ture break;
       ,           ,    2    ,       ,      ,
      Let it | be vir|tuous to | be ob|stinate.
        ,              ,    2    ,                  ,      ,
      What is | that cour|tesy worth?| Or those / doves' eyes,
             ,           ,         ,         ,       2    ,
      Which^can | make^gods | forsworn?| I melt,| and am not
        x             ,          ,            ,        ,
      Of stronger | earth than | others:| My mo|ther bows,
          ,     ,                ,   ,     ,
      As if | Olym|pus to a // molehill should
          ,      ,       ,               ,    ,
      In sup|plica|tion nod:| and my / young boy
        ,        ,  ,              ,          ,
      Hath an | aspect / of in|terces|sion, which
             ,        ,        ,    ,      2       ,
      Great^na|ture cries,| deny | not. Let^the | Volces
        T    T    .   T      ,    ,         ,     2->
      Plow Rome, and har|row I|taly,| I'll ne||ver
           ,       ,         2   ,         ,           ,
      Be such | a gos|ling to o/bey |*instinct,| but stand,  ??
          ,      ,          ,       ,        ,           ,       ,       ,  ->
      As if | a man | were au|thor of | himself,|| and knew | no o|ther kin.
 
VIRGILIA
           ,         ,       2->
      My lord | and hus||band.
 
CORIOLANUS
              ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      These eyes | are not | the same | I wore | in Rome.
 
VIRGILIA
           ,        ,       ,             ,     ,
      The sor|row that | deli|vers us / thus changed,
        ,           ,
      Makes you | think so*.
 
CORIOLANUS
                               T  .   T   T      ,
                             Like a dull ac|tor now,
      ,            ,         ,        ,       ,
      I have | forgot | my part,| and I | am out,
      ,        2    ,         ,       ,            ,
      Even | to a full | disgrace.| Best of | my flesh,
           ,        ,    ,         ,        ,
      Forgive | my ty|ranny:| but do | not say,
            ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      For that | forgive | our Ro|mans. O | a kiss
        ,           ,        ,         ,       ,
      Long as | my ex|ile, sweet | as my | revenge!
       ,            ,         ,           x            ,
      Now by | the jea|lous queen | of heaven,| that kiss
         ,                ,    ,               ,   ,
      I car|ried from / thee dear;| and my / true lip
            ,              ,    ,           ,        ,
      Hath vir|gined it / ere since.| You gods,| I pray,
                  ,   ,      ,       ,         ,
      And the / most no|ble mo|ther of | the world
             ,    ,        ,         ,      2      ,
      Leave^un|salu|ted: sink | my knee | in the earth,
                 ,   ,       ,        ,         ,
      Of thy / deep du|ty, more | impres|sion show
             ,        ,        ,
      Than that | of com|mon sons.
 
VOLUMNIA
                                        ,          ,
                                   Oh stand | up blest!
               ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      Whilst^with | no sof|ter cush|ion than | the flint
          ,         ,           ,       ,      ,
      I kneel | before | thee, and | unpro|perly
        ,   ,            ,        ,           ,
      Show du/ty as | mista|ken, all | this while,
          ,           ,          ,
      Between | the child,| and pa|rent.
 
[Kneels]
 
CORIOLANUS
      <-   ,      __            ,         , ->
        What's | this?|| Your knees | to me?
       ,            ,       ,
      To your | correc|ted son?
            ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
      Then let | the peb|bles on | the hun|gry beach
       ,             ,       ,             ,   2      ,
      Fillip | the stars:| then, let^|the mu|tinous winds
         T    .    T    T          ,          ,      ,
      Strike the proud ce|dars 'gainst | the fie|ry sun:
       ,   2         ,     ,    ,        ,
      Murdering | impos|sibi|lity,| to make
            ,       ,      ,     ,
      What can|not be,| slight work.  ????
 
VOLUMNIA
          x          ,     ,        ,         ,
      Thou art my | warri|or; I | hope to | frame thee.
       ,         ,          ,
      Do you | know this | lady?   ????
 
CORIOLANUS
           ,      ,     2    ,     ,     o
      The no|ble sis|ter of Pub|lico|la;
            ,         ,       ,            ,    ,
      The moon | of Rome,| chaste as | the i|cicle
              ,        ,         ,           ,        ,
      That's^cur|died by | the frost | from pu|rest snow
            ,         ,         x       ,      ,
      And hangs | on Di|an's^temple:| dear Va|leria.
 
VOLUMNIA
        ,           ,      ,    ,        ,
      This is | a poor | epi|tome | of yours,
        ,           2   ,      ,             ,    ,
      Which by | the inter|preta|tion of / full time,
            ,          ,          ,
      May show | like^all | yourself.
 
CORIOLANUS
                                           ,        ,        ->
                                      The god | of sol||diers,
        ,       2     ,             ,    ,        ,
      With | the consent | of sup/reme Jove,| inform
              ,            ,      ,           ,            ,
      Thy thoughts | with no|bleness,| that thou | mayst prove
           ,        ,       ,          ,       2      ,
      To shame | unvul|nerable,| and stick | in the wars
        T  .   T    T           ,        ,       ,
      Like a great sea-|mark* stan|ding ev|ery flaw,
           ,        ,           ,        2
      And sa|ving those | that eye | thee.
 
VOLUMNIA
                                                  ,     ,
                                           Your knee,| sirrah.
 
CORIOLANUS
        __     __    ___    ___   oo
      That's | my | brave | boy.|
 
VOLUMNIA
            ,          ,          ,      ,        ,
      Eene^he,| your wife,| this la|dy, and | myself,
           ,        ,
      Are sui|tors to | you.
 
CORIOLANUS
                             ,       ,           ,
                             I | beseech | you peace:
          ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      Or if | you'd ask,| remem|ber this | before;
            ,         ,         ,          ,           x
      The thing | I have | forsworn | to grant,| may never
           ,        ,       ,       ,        ,       2->
      Be held | by you | deni|als. Do | not bid || me
          ,         ,          ,      ,     ,
      Dismiss | my sol|diers, or | capi|tulate
         ,            ,        ,          ,        ,
      Again | with Rome's | mecha|nics: tell | me not
            ,       ,       ,   2         ,   ,
      Wherein | I seem | unna|tural: de/sire not
          ,     ,    ,         2   ,     2
      To al|ly my | rages | and reven|ges with
      <-  ,      ,        ,
        Your || colder | reasons.
 
VOLUMNIA
                                   T  T   T          ,
                                  Oh no more,| no* more:
         2       ,          ,          ,        ,     ,
      You have said | you will | not grant | us a|nything:
       ,             ,         ,        ,          ,
      For we | have no|thing else | to ask,| but that
             ,       ,      ,       ,      2      ,
      Which you | deny | alrea|dy: yet | we will ask,
            ,         ,        ,        ,           ,
      That if | you fail | in our | request,| the blame
            ,      ,           ,          ,            x
      May hang | upon | your hard|ness: there|fore hear us.
 
CORIOLANUS
         ,   2    ,         ,        ,          ,
      Aufi|dius, and | you Vol|ces mark,| for we'll
              ,            ,        ,          ,        ,
      Hear^nought | from Rome | in pri|vate. Your | request?
 
VOLUMNIA
         ,            ,     2     ,      ,          ,
      Should we | be si|lent and not | speak, our^|raiment
            ,         ,        ,         ,           ,
      And state | of bo|dies would | bewray | what life
        2      ,      ,          T T     T         2     ,
      We have led | since thy | exile. Think | with thyself
            ,       ,    2            ,   ,       ,     2->
      How more | unfor|tunate than / all li|ving wo||men
           ,         ,         ,       ,          ,              ,
      Are we | come^hi|ther: since | that thy | sight,| which should
          2      ,      ,          T      T     T           ,        o
      Make^our eyes | flow with | joy, hearts dance | with com|forts,  (hex with prev)
            ,             ,          ,            ,         ,       ->
      Constrains | them weep,| and shake | with fear | and sor||row,
       ,     2     ,         ,          ,         ,
      Ma|king the mo|ther, wife,| and child | to see,
           ,         ,         ,         ,        ,      2->
      The son,| the hus|band, and | the fa|ther tear||ing
            ,         ,       ,               ,   ,
      His coun|try's bow|els out;| and to / poor we
             ,    2     ,     ,          ,       ,
      Thine en|mity's^most | capi|tal: thou | barrst us
             ,                 ,     ,      ,      ,
      Our prayers | to the / gods, which | is a | comfort
            ,         ,      ,         ,     ,
      That all | but we | enjoy.| For how | can we?
        ,     ,         ,             ,        ,
      Alas!| How can | we for | our coun|try pray?
            ,     2      ,        ,     2      ,     ,   2
      Whereto | we are bound,| toge|ther with thy | victory,
            ,     2      ,        ,        ,          ,
      Whereto | we are bound?| Alack,| or we | must lose
            ,               ,    ,          ,         ,      2->
      The coun|try, our / dear nurse,| or else | thy per||son
           ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      Our com|fort in | the coun|try. We | must find
         ,     ,       ,    ,         2    ,
      An e|vident | cala|mity,| though we had
            ,            ,            ,         ,        ,
      Our wish,| which side | should win.| For ei|ther thou
        ,          ,        ,     ,        ,
      Must as | a for|eign re|creant | be led
            ,     ,       T     T     T           ,
      With ma|nacles | through our streets,| or else
          ,       ,     ,              ,          x
      Triumph|antly | tread on | thy coun|try's ruin,
            ,          ,         ,        ,        ,
      And bear | the palm,| for ha|ving brave|ly shed
            ,          ,           ,              ,    ,
      Thy wife | and chil|dren's blood.| For my/self, son,
         ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
      I pur|pose not | to wait | on for|tune till
              ,       ,         ,    2    ,         ,          ->
      These^wars | deter|mine: if | I cannot | persuade || thee,
       ,     2     ,        x       T    .   T    T
      Ra|ther to show | a noble | grace to both parts,
             ,         ,        ,           ,         ,      ->
      Than seek | the end | of one;| thou shalt | no soo||ner
        ,       2    ,           ,         ,         ,
      March | to assault | thy coun|try, than | to tread
         ,     2            ,      ,             ,          ,
      (Trust to it,| thou shalt | not) on | thy mo|ther's womb
              ,            ,          ,
      That brought | thee to | this world.  (cut off)
 
VIRGILIA
      ___         ,            ,            ,           ,
      Aye,| and mine,| that brought | you forth | this boy,
           ,           ,     ,            ,    oo
      To keep | your name | living | to time.|
 
YOUNG MARTIUS
           ,           ,         ,         ,      ,
      He shall | not tread | on me:| I'll run | away
           ,       ,        ,      T    T    T
      Till I | am big|ger, but | then I'll fight.
 
CORIOLANUS
       ,          ,        ,       ,        ,
      Not of | a wo|man's ten|derness | to be,
           ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      Requires | nor child | nor wo|man's face | to see.
       2      ,     T    T
      I have sat | too long.
 
[Rising]
 
VOLUMNIA
                             T        ,        2     ,
                            Nay,| go not | from us thus.
          ,         ,         ,        ,           ,
      If it | were so,| that our | request | did tend
           ,         ,         ,    ,          ,
      To save | the Ro|mans, there|by to | destroy
           ,        ,          ,           ,            x
      The Vol|ces whom | you serve,| you might | condemn us,
          ,    2     ,         ,       ,         ,
      As poi|sonous of | your ho|nor. No,| our suit
           ,         ,      ,            ,          ,      2->
      Is that | you re|concile | them: while | the Vol||ces
            ,          ,      ,           ,          ,      ->
      May* say,| this mer|cy we | have showed:| the Ro||mans,
        ,      2     ,           ,        ,        ,
      This | we received,| and each | in ei|ther side
        T   .   T   T          ,         ,          ,
      Give the all-hail | to thee | and cry,| be blessed
           ,       ,          ,             ,            ,
      For ma|king up | this peace.| Thou knowst |(great^son)
           ,         ,        ,                ,   ,       ->
      The end | of war's | uncer|tain, but / this cer||tain,
        ,      2      ,         ,         ,    ,
      That | if thou con|quer Rome,| the be|nefit
              ,            ,        ,         ,        ,
      Which thou | shalt there|by reap,| is such | a name
             ,    ,   ,      2        ,           ,
      Whose re|peti|tion will be | dogged with | curses:
              ,    2     ,      ,          ,         ,
      Whose^chron|icle thus | writ, the | man was | noble,
       ,               ,        ,          ,         ,
      But with | his last | attempt,| he wiped | it out:
           ,            ,        ,          ,        ,
      Destroyed | his coun|try, and | his name | remains
        3   3   ,      ,         ,       ,            ,
      To the ensu|ing age | abhorred.| Speak to | me son:
        ,      2    ,             ,       ,          ,
      Thou hast af|fected | the fine | strains of | honor,
          ,    ,         ,       ,         ,
      To im|itate | the gra|ces of | the gods,
           ,           ,              ,     ,       2     ,
      To tear | with thun|der the / wide cheeks | of the air,
           ,          ,          ,    ,             ,
      And yet | to charge | thy sul|phur with | a bolt
              ,           ,        ,          ,          ,
      That should | but rive | an oak.| Why dost | not speak?
         T      T   .  T   2  ,       2   ,      ,
      Thinkst thou it hon|orable | for a no|ble man
        ,           ,         ,       ,          ,
      Still to | remem|ber wrongs?| Daughter,| speak you:
           ,      ,              ,          ,           ,
      He cares | not for | your wee|ping. Speak | thou boy,
           ,          ,        ,           ,          ,
      Perhaps | thy chil|dishness | will move | him more
            ,         ,                  ,  ,      2      ,
      Than can | our rea|sons. There's^|no man | in the world
              ,       2     ,        ,        2     ,         ,
      More* bound | to his mo|ther, yet | here^he lets | me prate
            ,      2       ,       ,          ,   2           ,
      Like^one | in the stocks.| Thou hast | never in | thy life,
         ,                ,      ,      ,     ,
      Showed thy | dear* mo|ther a|ny cour|tesy,
            ,           ,      ,           ,        ,
      When she |(poor* hen)| fond of | no se|cond brood,
             ,            ,         ,          ,       ,
      Has clucked | thee to | the wars | and safe|ly home
       ,            ,       ,      2     ,          ,
      Laden | with ho|nor. Say | my request's | unjust,
            ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      And spurn | me back:| but if | it be | not so,
            ,     ,   ,          2        ,            ,
      Thou art | not ho/nest; and the | gods will | plague thee,
             ,          ,            ,        ,      ,
      That thou | restrainst | from me | the du|ty which
        2   ,          ,        ,          ,       ,
      To a mo|ther's part | belongs.| He turns | away:
        ,   ,                 ,           ,          ,
      Down la/dies; let^|us shame | him with | our knees.
        2     ,       2   ,   ,    2    ,             ,
      To his sur|name* Cori|ola|nus belongs | more* pride  ??
            ,     ,          ,       __        ,
      Than pi|ty to | our prayers.| Down:| an end;
        ,             ,     ,             ,         ,
      This is | the last.| So we | will home | to Rome,
           ,       ,          ,          ,          x
      And die | among | our neigh|bors. Nay,| behold us:
            ,          ,        ,          ,           ,
      This boy,| that can|not tell | what he | would have,
             ,           ,          ,          ,       ,
      But kneels,| and holds | up^hands | for fel|lowship,
            ,       ,       ,               ,      ,
      Does^rea|son our | peti|tion with / more strength
             ,      ,    2    ,        ,             ,
      Than thou | hast to de|ny it.| Come, let | us go:
            ,       ,       ,    ,     2       ,
      This fel|low had | a Vol|scian to his | mother;
            ,        ,      ,   ,      2      ,
      His wife | is in | Cori|oli,| and his child
        ,              ,           ,        ,         ,
      Like him | by chance.| Yet give | us our | dispatch:
       2      ,        ,         ,     ,      ,
      I am hushed | until | our ci|ty be | afire,
            ,           ,          x     oo
      And then | I'll speak | a little.|
 
[He holds her by the hand, silent]
 
CORIOLANUS
      _    ,        ,
      O | mother,| mother!  \\
        ,               ,        ,           x          ,
      What have | you done?| Behold,| the heavens | do ope,
            ,           ,          ,       ,   2     ,
      The gods | look^down,| and this | unna|tural scene
             ,          ,       ,        ,        ,
      They laugh | at. Oh | my mo|ther, mo|ther: Oh!
       ,          ,       ,       ,  2          ,
      You have | won a | happy | victory | to Rome;
       ,              ,        ,          ,          x
      But for | your son,| believe | it: Oh | believe it,
        ,   ,     2             ,          ,          ,
      Most dan/gerously | you have | with him | prevailed,
          ,          ,        x           ,         ,
      If not | most mor|tal to him.| But let | it come:
         ,   2      ,      2    ,      T    T    T
      Aufi|dius, though | I cannot | make true wars,
             ,         ,    2    ,      ,        2    ,  2
      I'll frame | conven|ient peace.| Now, good* Au|fidius,
            ,        ,     ,             ,           ,
      Were you | in my | stead, would | you have | heard
      <-      ,         ,          ,         ,      ,  2
        A || mother | less? Or | granted | less Au|fidius?
 
AUFIDIUS
       2      ,         ,
      I was moved | withal.
 
CORIOLANUS
                               ,         ,           ,
                           I dare | be sworn | you were:
           ,             ,  ,        ,          ,
      And sir,| it is / no lit|tle thing | to make
             ,         ,         ,         ,           ,
      Mine^eyes | to sweat | compas|sion. But |(good* sir)
             ,              ,        ,               ,   ,
      What peace | you'll make,| advise | me: for / my part,
            ,         ,           ,          ,          ,        ->
      I'll not | to Rome,| I'll back | with you,| and pray || you
        ,         ,     2       ,        ,         ,
      Stand | to me | in this cause.| O mo|ther! Wife!
 
AUFIDIUS [Aside]
       2     ,        2      ,         ,   ,    2       ,
      I am glad | thou hast set | thy mer|cy and thy | honor
          ,           ,          ,         ,           ,
      At dif|ference in | thee: out | of that | I'll work
          ,       ,       ,       2
      Myself | a for|mer for|tune*.
 
[The Ladies make signs to CORIOLANUS]
 
CORIOLANUS
      <-      ,        ,     ,    2         ,       ,     ->
        Aye* by | and by;|| but we will | drink to|gether;
           ,            ,
      And you | shall bear
         ,       ,         ,           ,            ,
      A bet|ter wit|ness back | than words,| which we
           ,        ,          ,           ,         ,
      On like | condi|tions, will | have coun|ter-sealed.
            ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      Come^en|ter with | us. La|dies you | deserve
           ,       ,        ,           ,           ,
      To have | a tem|ple built | you: all | the swords
         ,    ,        ,        ,   2      ,
      In I|taly,| and her | confe|derate arms
             ,           ,           ,
      Could not | have made | this peace.  \\
 
[Exeunt]

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