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Coriolanus

Act IV, Scene 5

The same. A hall in Aufidius's house.
 
[Music within. Enter a Servingman]
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Wine, wine, wine: What service is here? I think our fellows are asleep.
 
[Exit. Enter a second Servingman]
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Where's Cotus? my master calls for him. Cotus!
 
[Exit. Enter CORIOLANUS]
 
CORIOLANUS
A goodly house: The feast smells well: but I appear not like a guest.
 
[Re-enter the first Servingman]
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
What would you have, friend? whence are you? Here's no place for you: pray, go to the door.
 
[Exit]
 
CORIOLANUS
I have deserved no better entertainment, in being Coriolanus.
 
[Re-enter second Servingman]
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Whence are you, sir? Has the porter his eyes in his head; that he gives entrance to such companions? Pray, get you out.
 
CORIOLANUS
Away.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Away? Get you away.
 
CORIOLANUS
Now thou art troublesome.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Are you so brave? I'll have you talked with anon.
 
[Enter a third Servingman. The first meets him]
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
What fellow's this?
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
A strange one as ever I looked on: I cannot get him out of the house: prithee, call my master to him.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
What have you to do here, fellow? Pray you, avoid the house.
 
CORIOLANUS
Let me but stand; I will not hurt your hearth.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
What are you?
 
CORIOLANUS
A gentleman.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
A marvellous poor one.
 
CORIOLANUS
True, so I am.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Pray you, poor gentleman, take up some other station; here's no place for you; pray you, avoid: come.
 
CORIOLANUS
Follow your function, go, and batten on cold bits.
 
[Pushes him away]
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
What, you will not? Prithee, tell my master what a strange guest he has here.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
And I shall.
 
[Exit]
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Where dwellest thou?
 
CORIOLANUS
Under the canopy.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Under the canopy!
 
CORIOLANUS
Aye.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Where's that?
 
CORIOLANUS
In the city of kites and crows.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
In the city of kites and crows! What an ass it is! Then thou dwellest with daws too?
 
CORIOLANUS
No, I serve not thy master.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
How, sir! do you meddle with my master?
 
CORIOLANUS
Aye; 'tis an honester service than to meddle with thy mistress. Thou pratest, and pratest; serve with thy trencher, hence!
 
[Beats him away. Exit third Servingman. Enter AUFIDIUS with the second Servingman]
 
AUFIDIUS
Where is this fellow?
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Here, sir: I'd have beaten him like a dog, but for disturbing the lords within.
 
[Retires]
 
AUFIDIUS
Whence comest thou? what wouldst thou? thy name? Why speakst not? speak, man: what's thy name?
 
CORIOLANUS
If, Tullus, not yet thou knowst me, and, seeing me, dost not think me for the man I am, necessity commands me name myself.
 
AUFIDIUS
What is thy name?
 
CORIOLANUS
A name unmusical to the Volscians' ears, and harsh in sound to thine.
 
AUFIDIUS
Say, what's thy name?
             ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      Thou hast | a grim | appea|rance, and | thy face
        ,    2      ,              ,           ,         ,
      Bears a com|mand in | it: though | thy tack|le's torn,
              ,        ,      ,          ,           ,
      Thou showst | a no|ble ves|sel: what's | thy name?
 
CORIOLANUS
           ,          ,         ,        ,              ,
      Prepare | thy brow | to frown:| knowst thou*| me^yet?
 
AUFIDIUS
          ,          ,          ,
      I know | thee not:| thy name?  \\
 
CORIOLANUS
           ,        ,        ,       ,           ,
      My name | is Mar|tius Cai|us, who | hath done
           ,        ,   2   ,    ,        ,         ,
      To thee | partic|ularly | and to | all the | Volces
        T     T   .   T            ,       ,        ,
      Great hurt and mis|chief*: there|to wit|ness may
          ,    ,      ,    x            ,        ,
      My sur|name Co|rio|lanus: the | painful | service,  ?? (hex with prev two)
               ,    ,         ,          ,          ,
      The ex/treme dan|gers, and | the drops | of blood
        ,     2       ,           ,        ,      ,
      Shed for my | thankless | country | are re|quited
            ,          ,    ,         ,   ,
      But with | that sur|name; a | good mem/ory,
           ,    ,    2       ,        ,        ,
      And wit|ness of the | malice | and dis|pleasure
              ,               ,         ,   2       ,        ,
      Which thou | shouldst bear | me, on|ly that name | remains.
           ,     ,        ,  ,   2       ,
      The cru|elty | and en|vy of the | people,
          ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      Permit|ted by | our das|tard no|bles, who
            ,         ,          ,         ,           ,
      Have all | forsook | me, hath | devoured | the rest:
           ,         ,     2      ,           ,         ,
      And suf|fered me | by the voice | of slaves | to be
         T     T   .   T     ,            ,     ,
      Whooped out of Rome.| Now this | extre|mity
              ,          ,          ,      ,            ,
      Hath brought | me to | thy hearth,| not out^|of hope
           ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      (Mistake | me not)| to save | my life,| for if
                 ,     ,         ,         ,      2      ,
      I had / feared death,| of all | the men | in the world
          ,         2  ,        ,               ,    ,
      I would | have avoi|ded thee.| But in / mere spite
                ,    ,         ,         ,     ,
      To be / full quit | of those | my ba|nishers,
        ,           ,           ,          ,          ,
      Stand I | before | thee here.| Then if | thou hast
          ,          ,          ,           ,        ,
      A heart | of wreak | in thee,| that wilt | revenge
             ,        ,   2      ,           ,            ,
      Thine^own | parti|cular wrongs,| and stop | those maims
           ,       ,                  ,         ,              ,
      Of shame | seen through | thy coun|try, speed | thee straight
            ,        ,   2    ,           ,          x
      And make | my mi|sery serve | thy turn:| so use it,
            ,       ,        ,     ,          ,
      That my | revenge|ful ser|vices | may prove
          ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      As be|nefits | to thee.| For I | will fight
          ,         ,          ,        ,           ,
      Against | my can|kered coun|try with | the spleen
          ,         ,       ,           ,       ,
      Of all | the un|der fiends.| But if | so be,
             ,           ,     ,      2       ,           ,
      Thou darst | not this,| and that to | prove more*| fortunes
                ,           ,       ,       ,     ,
      Thou'rt^tired,| then in | a word,| I al|so am
       ,            ,          ,       ,         ,
      Longer | to live | most^wea|ry, and | present
            ,          ,     ,    2       ,         ,
      My throat | to thee,| and to thy | ancient | malice:
             ,        ,            ,          ,        ,
      Which^not | to cut | would show | thee but | a fool,
            ,        ,      ,          ,           ,
      Since^I | have e|ver fol|lowed thee | with hate,
        T     T   .   T      ,             ,           ,
      Drawn tuns of blood | out of | thy coun|try's breast,
           ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
      And can|not live | but to | thy shame,| unless
          ,       ,         ,       2
      It be | to do | thee ser|vice.
 
AUFIDIUS
                                          ,         ,
                                     Oh* Mar|tius, Martius;  ????
             ,        2       ,           ,        ,         ,
      Each^word | thou hast spoke | hath wee|ded from | my heart
          ,        ,        ,      ,    ,  2
      A root | of an|cient en|vy. If | Jupiter
         ,            T    T     T         ,       ,
      Should from | yond cloud speak | divine | things,
      <-        T    T    T         ,        ,            ,
        And || say 'tis true;| I'd not | believe | them more
             ,         ,      ,         ,         ,
      Than thee | all no|ble Mar|tius. Let | me twine
             ,       ,          ,       ,         ,
      Mine^arms | about | that bo|dy, where | against
           ,       ,       ,         ,            ,
      My grai|ned ash | a hun|dred times | hath broke,
             ,            ,           ,           ,        ,
      And scarred | the moon | with splin|ters: here | I clip
           ,      ,        ,          ,        ,
      The an|vil of | my sword,| and do | contest
          ,      ,        ,       ,          ,
      As hot|ly and | as no|bly with | thy love
         ,      ,      ,           ,         ,
      As e|ver in | ambi|tious strength | I did
           ,        ,          ,        ,           ,
      Contend | against | thy va|lor. Know | thou first,
          ,           ,       ,         ,      ,
      I loved | the maid | I mar|ried: ne|ver man
         T     Tx     T      ,            ,           ,
      Sighed truer breath;| but that | I see | thee here,
            ,       ,           ,             ,    ,
      Thou no|ble thing,| more dan|ces my / rapt heart,
             ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      Than when | I first | my wed|ded mis|tress saw
           ,           ,         ,            ,        ,         ->
      Bestride | my thresh|old. Why, | thou Mars | I tell || thee,
       ,       2    x          ,     ,   2       ,
      We | have a power | on foot:| and I had | purpose
        T    T   .  T         ,        ,          ,
      Once more to hew | thy tar|get from | thy brawn,
           ,          ,       x                 ,        ,
      Or lose | mine^arm | for it: thou | hast beat | me out
         T     Tx      T      ,             ,        ,
      Twelve several times,| and I | have nigh|tly since  ??
         ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
      Dreamt of | encoun|ters 'twixt | thyself | and me:
       ,               ,       ,       ,        ,
      We have | been down | toge|ther in | my sleep,
          ,         ,      ,             ,           ,
      Unbuck|ling helms,| fisting | each^o|ther's throat,
       .    T     T    T          ,         ,       ,        ->
      And waked half dead | with no|thing. Wor|thy Mar||tius,
       ,      2     ,        ,         ,     ,
      Had | we no quar|rel else | to Rome,| but that
        ,           ,    ,                     ,       ,
      Thou art | thence ba/nished, we | would mus|ter all
              ,         ,     ,        ,        ,
      From twelve | to se|venty,| and pou|ring war
       ,          ,            ,  ,         ,
      Into | the bow|els of / ungrate|ful Rome,
        T  .   T    T          ,         ,        ,
      Like a bold flood | orebear.| Oh come,| go in,
            ,           ,       ,     ,      2      ,
      And take | our friend|ly se|nators | by the hands
           ,          ,     ,                ,         ,
      Who now | are here,| taking | their leaves | of me,
           ,        ,         ,           ,      x
      Who am | prepared | against | your ter|ritories,
              ,          ,        ,
      Though not | for Rome | itself.
 
CORIOLANUS
                                           ,          ,
                                     You bless | me gods.
 
AUFIDIUS
             ,          ,   2      ,         ,           ,
      Therefore | most ab|solute* sir,| if thou | wilt have
           ,        ,          ,       ,         ,
      The lea|ding of | thine^own | reven|ges, take
           ,      ,         2    ,               ,    ,
      The one | half of | my commis|sion; and / set down
           ,          ,       ,  2         ,             ,
      As best | thou art | expe|rienced, since | thou knowst
            ,            ,            ,                ,    ,
      Thy coun|try's strength | and weak|ness, thine^/own ways
       ,             ,         ,           ,          ,
      Whether | to knock | against | the gates | of Rome,
           ,      ,       ,         ,         ,
      Or rude|ly vi|sit them | in parts | remote,
            ,            ,        ,      T    T   T
      To fright | them, ere | destroy.| But come in,
       ,            ,           ,          ,            ,
      Let me | commend | thee first,| to those | that shall
           ,        ,        ,         ,        ,         ->
      Say^yea | to thy | desires.| A thou|sand wel||comes*,
       ,        2     ,           ,       ,    ,
      And | more a friend | than ere | an e|nemy,
           ,          ,          ,           ,          ,
      Yet Mar|tius, that | was much.| Your hand:| most wel||come. \\ ????
 
[Exeunt CORIOLANUS and AUFIDIUS. The two Servingmen come forward]
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Here's a strange alteration?
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
By my hand, I had thought to have strucken him with a cudgel; and yet my mind gave me his clothes made a false report of him.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
What an arm he has! he turned me about with his finger and his thumb, as one would set up a top.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Nay, I knew by his face that there was something in him: he had, sir, a kind of face, methought,--I cannot tell how to term it.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
He had so; looking as it were--would I were hanged, but I thought there was more in him than I could think.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
So did I, I'll be sworn: he is simply the rarest man in the world.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
I think he is: but a greater soldier than he you wot on.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Who, my master?
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Nay, it's no matter for that.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Worth six on him.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Nay, not so neither: but I take him to be the greater soldier.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Faith, look you, one cannot tell how to say that: for the defense of a town, our general is excellent.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Aye, and for an assault too.
 
[Re-enter third Servingman]
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
O slaves, I can tell you news,-- news, you rascals!
 
FIRST AND SECOND SERVINGMAN
What, what, what? let's partake.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
I would not be a Roman, of all nations; I had as lieve be a condemned man.
 
FIRST AND SECOND SERVINGMAN
Wherefore? wherefore?
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Why, here's he that was wont to thwack our general, Martius Caius.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Why do you say 'thwack our general '?
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
I do not say 'thwack our general;' but he was always good enough for him.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Come, we are fellows and friends: he was ever too hard for him; I have heard him say so himself.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
He was too hard for him directly, to say the troth on it: before Corioli he scotched him and notched him like a carbon ado.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
An he had been cannibally given, he might have broiled and eaten him too.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
But, more of thy news?
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son and heir to Mars; set at upper end of the table; no question asked him by any of the senators, but they stand bald before him: our general himself makes a mistress of him: sanctifies himself with's hand and turns up the white of the eye to his discourse. But the bottom of the news is that our general is cut i' the middle and but one half of what he was yesterday; for the other has half, by the entreaty and grant of the whole table. He'll go, he says, and sowl the porter of Rome gates by the ears: he will mow all down before him, and leave his passage polled.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
And he's as like to do it as any man I can imagine.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Do it! he will do it; for, look you, sir, he has as many friends as enemies; which friends, sir, as it were, durst not, look you, sir, show themselves, as we term it, his friends whilst he's in directitude.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Directitude! what's that?
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
But when they shall see, sir, his crest up again, and the man in blood, they will out of their burrows, like conies after rain, and revel all with him.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
But when goes this forward?
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Tomorrow; today; presently; you shall have the drum struck up this afternoon: 'tis, as it were, a parcel of their feast, and to be executed ere they wipe their lips.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
Why, then we shall have a stirring world again. This peace is nothing, but to rust iron, increase tailors, and breed ballad-makers.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as day does night; it's spritely, waking, audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy; mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more bastard children than war's a destroyer of men.
 
SECOND SERVINGMAN
'Tis so: and as war, in some sort, may be said to be a ravisher, so it cannot be denied but peace is a great maker of cuckolds.
 
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Aye, and it makes men hate one another.
 
THIRD SERVINGMAN
Reason; because they then less need one another. The wars for my money. I hope to see Romans as cheap as Volscians. They are rising, they are rising.
 
ALL
In, in, in, in!
 
[Exeunt]

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