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Richard III

Act 5, Scene 3

Bosworth Field.
 
[Enter KING RICHARD III in arms, with NORFOLK, SURREY, and others]
 
KING RICHARD III
              ,           ,     2     ,        ,          ,
      Here* pitch | our tent,| even here | in Bos|worth field.
           ,        ,        ,      ,            ,
      My Lord | of Sur|rey, why | look you | so sad?
 
SURREY
           ,         ,      ,     ,                  ,
      My heart | is ten | times ligh/ter than | my looks.
 
KING RICHARD III
           ,        ,
      My Lord | of Nor|folk.
 
NORFOLK
                              ,          ,          ,
5                           Here | most gra|cious liege.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,             ,            ,      ,             ,
      Norfolk,| we must | have knocks:| Ha, must | we not?
 
NORFOLK
                  ,    ,          ,        ,        ,
      We must / both give | and take | my lo|ving lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,             ,      ,            ,        ,
      Up with | my tent,| here will | I lie | tonight,
            ,        ,         ,           ,          ,
      But where | tomor|row? Well,| all's^one | for that.
       ,      2      ,          ,        ,         ,
10    Who hath de|scried the | number | of the | traitors?
 
NORFOLK
       ,        ,        ,          2       ,        x
      Six or | seven | thousand | is their ut|most^power.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,            ,       ,         ,        ,
      Why our | battal|ion tre|bles that | account:
          ,            ,       ,           x            ,
      Besides,| the king's | name is | a tower | of strength,
              ,      ,         ,        ,         ,
      Which they | upon | the ad|verse fac|tion want.
       ,              ,           ,      ,      ,
15    Up with | the tent:| come* no|ble gen|tlemen,
       ,        ,            ,        ,          ,
      Let us | survey | the van|tage of | the ground.
        ,              ,         ,        ,        o
      Call for | some^men | of sound | direc|tion:
              ,        ,      ,       ,          ,
      Let's^lack | no di|scipline,| make no | delay,
            ,        ,       ,      ,     ,
      For lords,| tomor|row is | a bu|sy day.
 
[Exeunt. Enter, on the other side of the field, RICHMOND, Sir William Brandon, OXFORD, and others. Some of the Soldiers pitch RICHMOND's tent]
 
RICHMOND
           ,      ,           ,       ,       ,
20    The wea|ry sun,| hath made | a gol|den set,
       ,              ,       ,             ,       ,
      And by | the bright | tract of | his fie|ry cart,
        ,    ,       2      ,       ,      ,
      Gives to/ken of a | goodly | day to|morrow.
           ,         ,        ,            ,         ,        ->
      Sir Wil|liam Bran|don, you | shall bear | my stan||dard:
        ,      2      ,         ,      ,        ,
      Give | me some ink | and pa|per in | my tent:
             ,          ,         ,      ,          x
25    I'll draw | the form | and mo|del of | our battle,
       ,            ,       ,        ,   2      ,
      Limit | each lea|der to | his se|veral charge,
            ,         ,        ,               ,     x
      And part | in just | propor|tion our / small power.
           ,        ,        ,         ,         ,      2->
      My Lord | of Ox|ford, you | Sir Wil|liam Bran||don,
           ,         ,       ,          ,          ,
      And you | Sir Wal|ter Her|bert* stay | with me:
            ,        ,          ,          ,     ,
30    The Earl | of Pem|broke^keeps | his re|giment:
             ,         ,       ,               ,         ,
      Good* Cap|tain Blunt,| bear my | good* night | to him,
       ,    2       ,        ,      ,        ,
      And by the | second | hour | in the | morning,
          ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      Desire | the earl | to see | me in | my tent:
       T   T    T       ,           ,         ,    2
      Yet one thing | more (good*| captain)| do for me:
        ,               ,        ,          ,         ,
35    Where is | Lord^Stan|ley quar|tered, do | you know?
 
BLUNT
          ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      Unless | I have | mistane | his co|lors much,
               ,       ,       ,               ,    ,
      (Which^well | I am | assured | I have / not done)
           ,     ,           ,        ,         ,
      His re|giment | lies^half | a mile | at least
        ,                 ,      ,      ,         ,
      South, from | the migh|ty po|wer of | the king.
 
RICHMOND
           ,       ,      ,       ,     ,
40    If with|out pe|ril it | be pos|sible,
               ,       ,                 ,          ,           ,
      Sweet* Blunt,| make some | good* means | to speak | with him
            ,          ,                 ,    ,        ,
      And give | him from | me, this / most need|ful note.
 
BLUNT
        ,         ,         ,          ,        x
      Upon | my life,| my lord,| I'll un|dertake it,
           ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      And so | God* give | you qui|et rest | tonight.
 
RICHMOND
             ,            ,         ,       ,   ,
45    Good^night | good* Cap|tain Blunt:| Come gen/tlemen,
       ,    2      ,     ,      ,          ,
      Let us con|sult u|pon to|morrow's | business;
       ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      Into | my tent,| the air | is raw | and cold.
 
[They withdraw into the tent. Enter, to his tent, KING RICHARD III, NORFOLK, RATCLIFF, CATESBY, and others]
 
KING RICHARD III
            ,     2    ,
      What is | it o'clock?  (pickup after)
 
CATESBY
            ,       ,         ,           ,        ,
      It's sup|pertime | my lord,| it's nine | o'clock.
 
KING RICHARD III
          ,         ,        ,
50    I will | not sup | tonight,  (pickup from before)
        T   T   T     ,         ,      oo
      Give me some | ink and | paper:|
        ,            ,       ,   2    ,        ,
      What, is | my bea|ver ea|sier than | it was?
           ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      And all | my ar|mor laid | into | my tent?
 
CATESBY
          ,        ,          ,       ,      2       ,      T
      It is | my liege:| and all | things are in | readi||ness.
 
KING RICHARD III
        T   T         ,          ,          ,
55    Good Nor|folk, hie | thee to | thy charge,
            ,        ,              ,      ,      ,
      Use^care|ful watch,| choose^trus|ty sen|tinels.
 
NORFOLK
         ,        ,
      I go | my lord. (pickup after)
 
KING RICHARD III
        ,      2        ,      ,        ,        ,
      Stir with the | lark to|morrow,| gentle | Norfolk.
 
NORFOLK
         ,        ,         ,
      I war|rant you | my lord.  (pickup from before)
 
[Exit]
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,
      Ratcliff.
 
RATCLIFF
                     ,
                My lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
                          ,     2     ,    2           ,
60                      Send out a | pursuivant | at arms
           ,         ,     ,       2      ,           x
      To Stan|ley's reg|iment:| bid him bring | his power
          ,     ,  ,           2       T     T     T
      Before | sunri/sing, lest his | son George fall
       ,           ,       ,          ,       ,
      Into | the blind | cave of | eter|nal night.
       ,            ,         ,      ,           ,
      Fill me | a bowl | of wine:| give me | a watch,
       ,         ,    ,                  ,        ,
65    Saddle | white Sur/rey for | the field | tomor||row:
        ,               ,          ,          ,         ,        ,        o ->
      Look that | my staves | be sound,| and not | too hea||vy. Rat|cliff.
 
RATCLIFF
           ,
      My lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
                ,          ,      ,        ,        ,      __    oo
              Sawst the | melan||choly | Lord Nor|thumber|land?|
 
RATCLIFF
       ,             ,        ,        ,         ,
      Thomas | the Earl | of Sur|rey, and | himself,
        T  .  T    T          ,           ,          ,
      Much about cock-|shut^time,| from troop | to troop
              ,           ,       ,        ,        ,        o
70    Went^through | the ar|my, chee|ring up | the sol|diers.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,          ,      ,      ,           ,         ,
      So, I | am sa|tisfied:| Give me | a bowl | of wine, (hex with prev)
          ,          ,      ,     ,         x
      I have | not that | ala|crity | of spirit,
            ,          ,         ,         ,         ,
      Nor cheer | of mind | that I | was wont | to have.
       ,         ,         ,         ,       ,
      Set it | down. Is | ink and | paper | ready?
 
RATCLIFF
          ,        ,
75    It is | my lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
                                 ,     ,       ,
                      Bid my / guard watch.| Leave me.
       ,            ,         ,         ,       ,             , ->
      Ratcliff,| about | the mid | of night | come to || my tent
            ,        ,          ,       2   ,
      And help | to arm | me. Leave | me I say.
 
[Exeunt RATCLIFF and the other Attendants. Enter DERBY to RICHMOND in his tent, Lords and others attending]
 
DERBY
       ,             ,     ,    ,             ,
      Fortune,| and vic|tory | sit on | thy helm.
 
RICHMOND
           ,         ,          ,      ,             ,
80    All com|fort that | the dark | night can | afford,
       ,           ,        ,      ,     2    ,
      Be to | thy per|son, no|ble fa|ther-in-law.
        ,             ,          ,      ,       o
      Tell me,| how fares | our no|ble mo|ther?
 
DERBY
      ,   2    ,         ,            ,         ,
      I by at|torney,| bless thee | from thy | mother,
            ,         ,   2  ,         ,           ,
      Who prays | contin|ually | for Rich|mond's good:
           ,          ,         ,        ,            ,
85    So much | for that.| The si|lent hours | steal^on,
           ,       ,          ,         ,          ,
      And fla|ky dark|ness breaks | within | the east.
           ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      In brief,| for so | the sea|son bids | us be,
           ,         ,       ,    3  3     ,       o
      Prepare | thy bat|tle ear|ly in the mor|ning,
           ,         ,        ,        ,   2    ,
      And put | thy for|tune to | the ar|bitrement
           ,        ,           ,       ,        ,
90    Of bloo|dy strokes | and mor|tal-sta|ring war:
      ,          ,           ,         ,      2    ,
      I, as | I may,| that which | I would | I cannot,
             ,       ,         ,        ,           ,
      With best | advan|tage will | deceive | the time,
           ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      And aid | thee in | this doubt|ful shock | of arms.
           ,         ,       ,         ,        ,        ->
      But on | thy side | I may | not be | too for||ward,
        ,      2     ,         ,         ,         ,
95    Lest | being seen,| thy bro|ther, ten|der George
          ,   ,      ,        ,          ,
      Be ex|ecu|ted in | his fa|ther's sight.
            ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      Farewell:| the lei|sure and | the fear|ful time
            ,         ,    ,         ,         ,
      Cuts^off | the ce|remo|nious vows | of love,
           ,      ,      ,           ,           ,
      And am|ple in|terchange | of sweet | discourse,
             ,         ,           ,               ,       ,
100   Which so | long^sun|dered friends | should dwell | upon:
       T    T   .  T        ,            ,          ,
      God give us lei|sure for | these rites | of love.
             ,       ,        ,   2            ,     ,
      Once^more | adieu,| be va|liant, and / speed well.
 
RICHMOND
              ,          ,         ,        ,     ,
      Good* lords | conduct | him to | his re|giment:
              ,            ,         ,          ,       ,
      I'll strive | with trou|bled noise,| to take | a nap,
            ,        ,        ,          ,       ,      2->
105   Lest^lea|den slum|ber peise | me down | tomor||row,
           ,            ,            ,         ,     ,
      When I | should mount | with wings | of vic|tory:
             ,           ,            ,          ,      ,
      Once^more,| good night | kind^lords | and gen|tlemen.
 
[Exeunt all but RICHMOND]
          ,           ,       ,       ,         ,
      O thou,| whose^cap|tain I | account | myself,
        ,           ,        ,       ,         ,
      Look on | my for|ces with | a gra|cious eye;
       ,               ,           ,         ,          ,
110   Put in | their hands | thy brui|sing irons | of wrath,
             ,          ,       ,            ,       ,
      That they | may crush | down with | a hea|vy fall,
         2  ,        ,        ,        ,     ,      ->
      The usur|ping hel|mets of | our ad|versa||ries;
        ,      2     ,     ,          ,    ,
      Make | us thy mi|nisters | of chas|tisement,
        ,              ,           ,        ,     ,
      That we | may praise | thee in | the vic|tory:
           ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
115   To thee | I do | commend | my watch|ful soul,
       ,            ,         ,        ,          ,
      Ere I | let fall | the win|dows of | mine^eyes:
        ,             ,        ,       ,         ,
      Sleeping,| and wa|king, oh | defend | me still.
 
[Sleeps. Enter the Ghost of Prince Edward, son to King Henry VI
 
GHOST OF PRINCE EDWARD
       ,            ,    3  3      ,       ,       o
      Let me | sit hea|vy on thy soul | tomor|row:
        ,                 ,          ,        ,          ,
      Think how | thou stabbst | me in | my prime | of youth
           ,    ,         ,       ,              ,
120   At Tewks|bury:| despair | therefore,| and die.
           ,          ,         ,          ,        ,
      Be cheer|ful, Rich|mond, for | the wrong|ed souls
           ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      Of butch|ered prin|ces, fight | in thy | behalf:
            ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
      King^Hen|ry's is|sue Rich|mond com|forts thee.
 
[Enter the Ghost of King Henry VI]
 
GHOST OF KING HENRY VI
           ,        ,        ,      ,       ,    ->
      When I | was mor|tal, my | anoin|ted bo||dy
       ,     ,          ,         ,        ___
125   By | thee was | punched | full of | holes;
        ,              x          ,       ,          ,
      Think on | the Tower,| and me:| despair,| and die,
       ,            ,       ,             ,          ,
      Harry | the Sixth,| bids thee | despair,| and die.
 
[To RICHMOND]
       ,   2          ,     ,         ,      ,
      Virtuous | and ho|ly be | thou con|queror:
       ,            ,       ,             ,           ,
      Harry | that pro|phesied | thou shouldst | be king,
            ,         ,      2      ,       ,           ,
130   Doth^com|fort thee | in thy sleep:| live, and | flourish.
 
[Enter the Ghost of CLARENCE]
 
GHOST OF CLARENCE
           ,        ,    3  3      ,       ,       o
      Let me | sit hea|vy in thy soul | tomor|row,
      ,               ,          ,           ,         ,
      I that | was washed | to death | with ful|some wine:
             ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Poor* Cla|rence by | thy guile | betrayed | to death:
         ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      Tomor|row in | the bat|tle think | on me,
            ,          ,         ,         ,          ,
135   And fall | thy edge|less sword,| despair | and die.
 
[To RICHMOND]
            ,          ,         ,         ,      ,
      Thou off|spring of | the house | of Lan|caster
            ,        ,          ,         ,          ,
      The wrong|ed heirs | of York | do pray | for thee,
            ,        ,            x       ,          ,
      Good^an|gels guard | thy battle,| live and | flourish.
 
[Enter the Ghosts of RIVERS, GRAY, and VAUGHAN]
 
GHOST OF RIVERS
           ,        ,    3  3      ,       ,       o
      Let me | sit hea|vy in thy soul | tomor|row,
       ,     2         ,        ,            ,          ,
140   Rivers, that | died at | Pomfret:| despair | and die.
 
GHOST OF GRAY
        ,           ,         ,          ,        ,
      Think u|pon Gray,| and let | thy soul | despair.
 
GHOST OF VAUGHAN
        ,          ,         ,           ,       ,
      Think u|pon Vau|ghan, and | with guil|ty fear
            ,          ,         ,          ,
      Let fall | thy lance,| despair | and die.
 
ALL
                                                   ,
                                                Awake,
            ,            ,         ,          ,    2->
      And think | our wrongs | in Ri|chard's bo|som,
            ,        ,       ,         ,         ,
145   Will con|quer him.| Awake,| and win | the day.
 
[Enter the Ghost of HASTINGS]
 
GHOST OF HASTINGS
        ,            ,        ,     ,      ,
      Bloody | and guil|ty: guil|tily | awake,
           ,       ,      ,       ,          ,
      And in | a bloo|dy bat|tle end | thy days.
        ,          T   T   T         ,          ,
      Think on | Lord Hastings:| despair,| and die.
 
[To RICHMOND]
       ,          ,         ,       ,       ,
      Quiet | untrou|bled soul,| awake,| awake!
       T     T     .   T                ,   ,           ,
150   Arm, fight, and con|quer, for / fair Eng|land's^sake.
 
[Enter the Ghosts of the two young Princes]
 
GHOSTS OF YOUNG PRINCES
        ,             ,        ,          ,         ,
      Dream on | thy cou|sins smo|thered in | the Tower:
       ,    2      ,       ,         ,       ,
      Let us be | led wi|thin thy | bosom,| Richard,
            ,            ,        ,       ,           ,
      And weigh | thee down | to ru|in, shame,| and death,
           ,          ,      ,             ,          ,
      Thy ne|phews' souls | bid thee | despair | and die.
        ,     ,          ,        ,           ,        ,
155   Sleep Rich/mond, sleep in peace,| and wake | in joy,  ????
            ,        ,            ,          ,         ,
      Good^an|gels guard | thee from | the boar's | annoy,
        ,            ,       ,       ,         ,
      Live, and | beget | a hap|py race | of kings,
       ,      2    ,        ,         ,           ,
      Edward's un|happy | sons, do | bid thee | flourish.
 
[Enter the Ghost of LADY ANNE]
 
GHOST OF LADY ANNE
       ,              ,            ,        ,          ,
      Richard,| thy wife,| that wretch|ed Anne | thy wife,
            ,       ,        ,       ,           ,
160   That ne|ver slept | a qui|et hour | with thee,
       T    T    T      ,           ,      ,
      Now fills thy | sleep with | pertur|bations,
         ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
      Tomor|row in | the bat|tle, think | on me,
            ,          ,         ,         ,          ,
      And fall | thy edge|less sword,| despair | and die:
 
[To RICHMOND]
            ,       ,      ,             ,       ,
      Thou qui|et soul,| sleep thou | a qui|et sleep:
        ,             ,         ,      ,     ,
165   Dream of | success,| and hap|py vic|tory,
           ,     ,        ,           ,          ,
      Thy ad|versa|ry's wife | doth pray | for thee.
 
[Enter the Ghost of BUCKINGHAM]
 
GHOST OF BUCKINGHAM
            ,         ,           ,           ,         ,
      The first | was I | that helped | thee to | the crown;
            ,        ,          ,         ,     ,
      The last | was I | that felt | thy ty|ranny,
      ,            ,        ,          ,      ,
      O, in | the bat|tle think | on Buck|ingham,
           ,        ,       ,         ,      ,
170   And die | in ter|ror of | thy guil|tiness.
             ,          ,        ,       ,           ,
      Dream^on,| dream^on,| of bloo|dy deeds | and death,
        ,            ,         ,         ,            ,
      Fainting | despair;| despai|ring yield | thy breath.
 
[To RICHMOND]
          ,          ,     ,              ,          ,
      I died | for hope | ere I | could lend | thee aid;
            ,           ,          ,         ,         ,
      But cheer | thy heart,| and be | thou not | dismayed:
       ,               ,        ,          ,           ,
175   God, and | good^an|gels fight | on Rich|mond's side,
           ,         ,          ,          ,          ,
      And Ri|chard falls | in height | of all | his pride.
 
[The Ghosts vanish. KING RICHARD III starts out of his dream]
 
KING RICHARD III
        ,         ,        ,           ,         ,
      Give me | ano|ther horse,| bind^up | my wounds:
            ,      ,       ,       ,          ,
      Have mer|cy Je|su. Soft,| I did | but dream.
         ,       ,            ,        3    3    ,         o
      O cow|ard con|science! How | dost thou afflict | me?
             ,       ,    ,                  ,     ,
180   The lights | burn blue./ It is | not dead | midnight.
        T    T  .    T       ,             ,          ,
      Cold fearful drops | stand on | my trem|bling flesh.
        ,            ,        ,              ,          ,
      What? Do | I fear | myself?| There's none | else^by,
       ,               ,          ,     ,         ,
      Richard | loves^Ri|chard, that | is, I | am I.
       ,      2     ,   2       T    T   T       ,
      Is there a | murderer | here? No; yes,| I am:
            ,      ,             ,           ,        ,
185   Then fly.| What from | myself?| Great^rea|son: why?
        ,          ,       ,        ,     ,      __
      Lest I | revenge.| What? My|self u|pon my|self?
         ,        ,        ,           ,        ,      ,
      Alack,| I love | myself.| Wherefore?| For a|ny good  (hex with prev)
           ,       ,           ,       ,       ,
      That I | myself,| have done | unto | myself?
         ,     ,       ,        ,        ,
      O no.| Alas,| I ra|ther hate | myself,
            ,        ,         ,       ,       ,
190   For hate|ful deeds | commit|ted by | myself.
      ,         ,         ,       ,     2    ,
      I am | a vil|lain: yet | I lie,| I am not.
        ,     2      T    T     T      ,     2        ,
      Fool, of thy|self speak well:| fool, do not | flatter.
          ,            ,        ,        ,   2      ,
      My con|science hath | a thou|sand se|veral tongues,
          ,   2     ,             ,      ,   2     ,
      And e|very tongue | brings^in | a se|veral tale,
          ,   2    ,         ,         ,       ,        ->
195   And e|very tale | condemns | me for | a vil||lain;
       ,     ,    ,         ,           ,
      Per|jury,| in the | highest | degree,
       ,         ,    ,         2       ,           ,
      Murder,| stern mur/der, in the | direst | degree;
           ,   2     ,          ,         ,        ,
      All se|veral sins,| all used | in each | degree,
              ,      2     ,       2    ,      ,        ,
      Throng^all | to the bar,| crying^all,| guilty,| guilty.
      ,      2     ,             ,        ,          ,
200   I shall de|spair, there | is no | creature | loves me;
           ,      ,         ,           ,     ,
      And if | I die,| no soul | shall pi|ty me.
       ,                   ,             ,          ,       ,
      Nay, where*|fore* should | they? Since | that I | myself
        ,           ,        ,     ,       ,
      Find in | myself,| no pi|ty to | myself.
           ,            ,         ,         ,        ,        ->
      Methought,| the souls | of all | that I | had mur||dered
        ,      2     ,        ,   2   ,           ,
205   Came | to my tent;| and e|very one | did threat
         ,         ,     ,     2        ,        ,
      Tomor|row's ven|geance on the | head of | Richard.
 
[Enter RATCLIFF]
 
RATCLIFF
           ,
      My lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
                       ,
               Who's there?  (pickup after)
 
RATCLIFF
       ,              ,         ,        ,      ,          ,
      Ratcliff | my lord,| 'tis I:| The ear|ly vil||lage-cock
             ,           ,    ,     3  3      ,
      Hath twice | done sal|uta|tion to the morn,
              ,           ,          x      ,          ,
      Your friends | are up,| and buckle | on their | armor.
 
KING RICHARD III
         ,        2    ,        ,
210   O Rat|cliff, I fear,| I fear.  (pickup from before)
 
RATCLIFF
            ,         ,        ,       ,         ,       ->
      Nay good | my lord,| be not | afraid | of sha||dows.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,      2  ,        ,     ,            ,
      By | the apos|tle Paul,| shadows | tonight
              ,       ,   ,        2        ,        ,
      Have struck | more ter/ror to the | soul of | Richard,
            ,         ,        2     ,     ,         ,
      Than can | the sub|stance of ten | thousand | soldiers
        ,          ,           ,         ,         ,
215   Armed in | proof, and | led by | shallow | Richmond.
        2    ,     T    T   T           ,         ,
      It is not | yet near day.| Come* go | with me,
       ,            ,            ,          ,     ,
      Under | our tents | I'll play | the eaves|dropper,
          ,       ,      ,          ,           ,
      To see | if a|ny mean | to shrink | from me.
 
[Exeunt. Enter the Lords to RICHMOND, sitting in his tent]
 
LORDS
            ,        ,
      Good mor|row Rich|mond. (pickup after)
 
RICHMOND
           ,       ,           ,        ,      ,
220   Cry mer|cy lords,| and watch|ful gen|tlemen,
            ,           ,       ,       ,         ,
      That you | have tane | a tar|dy slug|gard here?
 
LORDS
                              ,        2      ,          ,
                             How | have you slept | my lord?  (pickup from before)
 
RICHMOND
            ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      The swee|test sleep,| and fai|rest-bo|ding dreams
           ,      ,        ,       ,       ,
      That e|ver en|tered in | a drow|sy head,
           ,           ,       ,        ,         ,
225   Have I | since your | depar|ture had | my lords.
           ,              ,            ,       ,        ,         ->
      Methought | their souls,| whose^bo|dies Ri|chard mur||dered,
        ,      2     ,          ,      ,  ,
      Came | to my tent,| and cried | on vic/tory:
         ,        ,         ,         ,     ,      ->
      I pro|mise you | my heart | is ve|ry jo||cund,
       ,      2   ,          ,        ,        ,
      In | the remem|brance of | so fair | a dream,
           ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
230   How far | into | the mor|ning is | it lords?
 
LORDS
        ,           ,          ,
      Upon | the stroke | of four.
 
RICHMOND
      <-      ,          ,         ,          ,       ,        o
        Why then |'tis time || to arm,| and give | direc|tion.
      <-  ,          ,         __     ,        ,      ___
        More than || I have | said,| loving | country|men,
           ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      The lei|sure and | enforce|ment of | the time
           ,         ,       ,       2   ,        ,
235   Forbids | to dwell | upon:| yet remem|ber this,
       ,      2        T    T      T       ,          ,
      God, and our | good cause, fight | upon | our side,
             ,          ,       ,           ,        ,
      The prayers | of ho|ly saints | and wrong|ed souls,
        .    T     T    T    T      T    .  T         ,      ->
      Like^high-reared bul|warks, stand before | our fa||ces,
        ,      2    ,      ,               ,         ,
      (Ri|chard except)| those whom | we fight | against,
           ,     2      ,    ,           ,          ,
240   Had ra|ther have us | win, than | him they | follow.
       ,       2      ,         ,        ,       ,    2
      For, what is | he they | follow?| Truly | gentlemen,
          ,      ,        ,       ,     ,
      A bloo|dy ty|rant, and | a ho|micide:
             ,          ,          ,         ,        ,         ->
      One^raised | in blood,| and one | in blood | estab||lished;
       ,           ,      ,          ,           2     ,
      One | that made | means to | come by | what he hath,
             ,           ,       ,      2        ,          ,
245   And slaugh|tered those | that were the | means to | help him;
          ,      T    T      T     ,           2      ,
      A base | foul stone, made | precious | by the soil
          ,           ,       ,             ,       ,
      Of Eng|land's chair,| where he | is false|ly set:
       ,              ,       ,          ,    ,
      One that | hath e|ver been | God's^e|nemy.
        ,             ,         ,           ,    ,
      Then if | you fight | against | God's^e|nemy,
        ,     2      ,          ,         ,        ,
250   God will in | justice | ward you | as his | soldiers.
          ,         ,         ,       ,        ,
      If you | do swear | to put | a ty|rant down,
            ,          ,          ,       ,       ,
      You sleep | in peace,| the ty|rant be|ing slain:
          ,         ,         ,            ,          ,
      If you | do fight | against | your coun|try's foes,
             ,         ,           ,           ,            x
      Your coun|try's fat | shall pay | your pains | the higher.
          ,         ,          ,    ,               ,
255   If you | do fight | in safe|guard of | your wives,
             ,            ,         ,         ,       ,
      Your wives | shall wel|come home | the con|querors;
          ,         ,           ,         ,          ,
      If you | do free | your chil|dren from | the sword,
             ,           ,         ,        ,         ,
      Your chil|dren's chil|dren quit | it in | your age.
        ,             ,        ,         ,             ,
      Then in | the name | of God | and all | these rights,
          ,            ,           ,          ,          ,
260   Advance | your stan|dards, draw | your wil|ling swords.
           ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      For me,| the ran|som of | my bold | attempt,
             ,          ,       ,     2        T       T    T
      Shall be | this cold | corpse on the | earth's cold face,
           ,        ,           ,        ,       ,
      But if | I thrive,| the gain | of my | attempt,
            ,         ,            ,           ,          ,
      The least | of you | shall share | his part | thereof.
              ,           ,         ,       ,      ,     2
265   Sound^drums | and trum|pets bold|ly, and | cheerfully.
       ,                  ,       ,             ,     ,
      God, and | Saint^George,| Richmond,| and vic|tory.
 
[Exeunt. Re-enter KING RICHARD, RATCLIFF, Attendants and Forces]
 
KING RICHARD III
             ,          ,      ,        ,          ,        ->
      What said | Northum|berland | as tou|ching Rich||mond?
 
RATCLIFF
        ,      2     ,         ,      ,       __
      That | he was ne|ver trained | up in | arms.
 
KING RICHARD III
           ,          ,           ,          ,        ,
      He said | the truth:| and what | said Sur|rey then?
 
RATCLIFF
            ,           ,         ,     3   3     ,
270   He smiled | and said,| the bet|ter for our pur|pose.
 
KING RICHARD III
      <- ,         ,         ,          ,       ,        ,
        He || was in | the right,| and so | indeed | it is.
       ,          T     T      T      2   ,     ,
      Ten the | clock there. Give | me a ca|lendar:
           ,         ,       ,
      Who saw | the sun | today?
 
RATCLIFF
                                    ,        ,
                                Not I | my lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
        ,            ,          ,          ,         ,
275   Then he | disdains | to shine:| for by | the book
            ,             ,           ,         ,      ,
      He should | have braved | the east | an hour | ago,
          ,      ,             ,        ,    2    ,        2->
      A black | day will | it be | to some|body. Rat||cliff.
 
RATCLIFF
           ,
      My lord.
 
KING RICHARD III
                   ,          ,         ,       ,
              The sun | will not | be seen | today,
           ,           ,           ,      ,         ,     ->
      The sky | doth frown,| and lour | upon | our ar||my.
      ,        2       ,      ,            ,           ,
280   I | would these de|wy tears | were from | the ground.
       T    T    . T     ,               ,        ,
      Not shine today?| Why, what | is that | to me
        ,      2       ,                    ,   ,     ,
      More than to | Richmond?| for the / selfsame | heaven
              ,         ,          ,        ,   ,
      That frowns | on me,| looks sad|ly u/pon him.
 
[Enter NORFOLK]
 
NORFOLK
       T    T    .   T         ,       ,              ,
      Arm, arm, my lord:| the foe | vaunts in | the field.
 
KING RICHARD III
        T     Tx      Tx        ,    ,         ,
285   Come, bustle, bustle.| Capa|rison | my horse.
         Tx     T    T        ,          ,           x
      Call up Lord Stan|ley, bid | him bring | his power,
      ,               ,         ,         ,         ,
      I will | lead^forth | my sol|diers to | the plain,
            ,        ,        ,         ,        o
      And thus | my bat|tle shall | be or|dered.
           ,         ,          ,          ,          ,
      My fore|ward shall | be drawn | out^all | in length,
          ,       ,      ,        ,           ,
290   Consis|ting e|qually | of horse | and foot:
           ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      Our ar|chers shall | be pla|ced in | the midst;
        T    T   .  T          ,        ,        ,       o ->
      John Duke of Nor|folk*, Tho|mas Earl | of Sur||rey,
              ,         ,        ,          ,           ,   ->
      Shall have | the lea|ding of | this foot || and horse.
        ,      2    ,        ,         ,
      They thus di|rected,| we will | follow
        2      ,     ,               ,       2    ,        ,
295   In the main | battle,| whose puis|sance on ei|ther side
                   ,    ,       ,          ,         ,
      Shall be / well-wing|ed with | our chie|fest horse:
        ,      2          ,          ,             ,            ,
      This, and Saint^|George to | boot. What | thinkst thou,| Norfolk.
 
NORFOLK
          ,       ,        ,        ,     ,
      A good | direc|tion war|like so|vereign,
        T    T   T     2     ,          ,        o
      This found I | on my tent | this mor|ning.
        ,          ,             ,           ,
300   Jockey of | Norfolk, | be not | too* bold,
             x          ,     2     ,            ,
      For Dickon | thy mas|ter is bought | and sold.  (tetra with prev)
 
KING RICHARD III
          ,         ,       2    ,    ,
      A thing | devised | by the e|nemy.
      <-__     ,          ,   2   ,       ,          ,
        Go || gentle|men, e|very man | unto | his charge,
       ,             ,           ,          ,           ,
      Let not | our bab|bling dreams | affright | our souls:
           ,           ,       ,          ,        ,
305   For con|science is | a word | that cow|ards use,
          ,          ,          ,           ,         ,
      Devised | at first | to keep | the strong | in awe:
             ,       ,            ,              ,          ,
      Our strong | arms be | our con|science, swords | our law.
             ,     ,    ,          2       Tx    T    T
      March^on,| join brave/ly, let us | to it pell-mell,
          ,          x            ,         ,         ,
      If not | to heaven,| then hand | in hand | to hell.
             ,        ,      ,         ,             ,
310   What shall | I say | more than | I have | inferred?
         ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      Remem|ber whom | you are | to cope | withal,
          ,        ,     ,      ,             ,     ,
      A sort | of vag|abonds,| rascals,| and run|aways,
          ,        ,       o         ,      ,       ,
      A scum | of Bre|tons,  | and base | lackey | peasants,  (hex with prev)
                    ,    ,       ,       ,        ,
      Whom their / ore-cloy|ed coun|try vom|its forth
          ,    3   3   ,          ,        ,          ,       ->
315   To des|perate adven|tures, and | assured | destruc||tion.
       ,      ,          ,            ,     2          ,
      You | sleeping | safe, they | bring to you | unrest:
       ,            ,           ,            ,    2     ,
      You ha|ving lands,| and blest | with beau|teous wives,
        ,       2      ,          ,         ,        ,
      They would re|strain the | one, dis|tain the | other,
           ,           ,      ,      2     ,        ,
      And who | doth lead | them, but a | paltry | fellow?
             ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
320   Long^kept | in Bri|tain at | our mo|ther's cost,
      .   T   T    T          ,      ,         ,
      A milk-sop, one | that ne|ver in | his life
            ,          ,       ,       ,          ,
      Felt so | much cold,| as o|ver shoes | in snow:
              ,            ,          ,          ,       ,
      Let's^whip | these strag|glers ore | the seas | again,
             ,           ,     ,         ,          ,
      Lash^hence | these o|verwee|ning rags | of France,
             ,         ,         ,      ,           ,
325   These fa|mished beg|gars, wea|ry of | their lives,
       ,      2        ,         ,          T   T  T
      Who (but for | dreaming | on this | fond exploit)
            ,         ,            ,           ,            ,
      For want | of means |(poor^rats)| had hanged | themselves.
          ,       ,                 ,   ,      2
      If we | be con|quered, let / men con|quer us,
      <- ,      ,           ,         ,          ,         ,
        And || not these | bastard | Bretons,| whom our | fathers
        ,    2         T    T   T          ,            ,
330   Have in their | own land bea|ten, bobbed,| and thumped,
           ,    ,         ,               ,          ,
      And on | record,| left them | the heirs | of shame.
               ,        ,          ,      ,               ,
      Shall* these | enjoy | our lands?| Lie with | our wives?
       ,             ,           ,        ,            ,
      Ravish | our daugh|ters? Hark,| I hear | their drum,
             ,     3  3    ,          ,       ,       ,
      Right^gen|tlemen of Eng|land, fight | boldly | yeomen,
            ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
335   Draw^ar|chers draw | your ar|rows to | the head,
        ,           T     Tx     T          ,         ,
      Spur your | proud horses hard,| and ride | in blood,
         ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      Amaze | the wel|kin with | your bro|ken staves.
             ,           ,         ,         ,           x
      What says | Lord^Stan|ley, will | he bring | his power?
 
MESSENGER
           ,         ,       ,        ,
      My lord,| he doth | deny | to come.
 
KING RICHARD III
       ,              ,      ,         __
340   Off with | his son | George's | head.  (tetrameter with prev)
 
NORFOLK
           ,        ,    ,        ,          ,
      My lord,| the e|nemy | is past | the marsh:
       ,   2       ,        T     T     T       ,
      After the | battle,| let George Stan|ley die.
 
KING RICHARD III
      <-    ,           ,           ,         ,        ,     o
        A thou||sand hearts | are great | within | my bo|som.
          ,           ,          ,      ,          ,
      Advance | our stan|dards, set | upon | our foes,
           ,         ,        ,          ,             ,
345   Our an|cient word | of cou|rage, fair | Saint^George,
          ,      ,     2         ,         ,       ,
      Inspire | us with the | spleen of | fiery | dragons:
        ,      ,    ,           ,             ,
      Upon | them, vic/tory | sits on | our helps.
 
[Exeunt]

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