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Richard II

Act V, Scene 5

Pomfret castle.
 
[Enter KING RICHARD]
 
KING RICHARD II
      ,               ,   2     ,       ,         ,
      I have | been stu|dying, how | I may | compare
        ,   ,                  ,       ,         ,
      This pri/son where | I live,| unto | the world:
           ,        ,           ,         ,     ,
      And for | because | the world | is pop|ulous,
            ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      And here | is not | a creat|ure, but | myself,
         ,       ,        ,          ,     2    ,
      I can|not do | it: yet | I'll ham|mer it out.
           ,            ,          ,       ,        ,
      My brain,| I'll prove | the fe|male to | my soul,
           ,         ,               ,    ,       ,
      My soul,| the fath|er: and / these two | beget
         ,    ,             ,     ,           ,
      A ge|nera|tion of / still-breed|ing thoughts;
                    ,      ,       ,             ,        ,
      And these / same thoughts,| people | this lit|tle world,
          ,         ,         ,             ,    ,
      In hum|ors, like | the peo|ple of / this world,
           ,      ,      2     ,            ,        ,
      For no | thought is con|tented.| The bet|ter sort,
             ,            ,         ,         ,      ,
      As thoughts | of things | divine,| are int|ermixed
             ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      With scru|ples, and | do set | the faith | itself
          ,           ,          ,    oo
Against | the faith:| as thus: Come little ones:| and then | again,  ????
       ,           ,         ,     ,    2     ,
      It is | as hard | to come,| as for a | camel
            ,          ,    ,    2    
To thread | the pos|tern of a | needle's eye.
          ,     ,         2    ,         ,         ,
      Thoughts ten/ding to am|bition,| they do | plot
      <-      ,       ,         ,            T    T    T
        Un||likely | wonders;| how these | vain weak nails
            ,       ,          ,            ,       ,
      May tear | a pas|sage through | the flin|ty ribs
                  ,    ,         ,       ,        ,
      Of this / hard world,| my rag|ged pris|on walls:
           ,              ,    ,                ,    ,
      And for | they can/not, die | in their / own pride.
          ,     ,                 ,      ,              ,
      Thoughts ten/ding to | content,| flatter | themselves
             ,         ,          ,         ,            ,
      That they | are not | the first | of for|tune's slaves,
       ,           ,    2        T     T   T      ,       ->
      Nor shall | not be the | last. Like sil|ly beg||gars,
       ,     ,          2       ,         ,            ,
      Who | sitting | in the stocks,| refuge | their shame
            ,      ,        ,               ,    ,
      That ma|ny have,| and oth|ers must / sit there;
           ,           ,             ,        ,         ,
      And in | this thought,| they find | a kind | of ease,
        ,              ,        ,         ,         ,
      Bearing | their own | misfor|tunes on | the back
           ,         ,        ,        ,           ,
      Of such | as have | before | endured | the like.
             ,     2    ,     ,        ,      ,
      Thus play | I in one | prison,| many | people,
            ,        ,         ,    ,     2      ,
      And none | content|ed. Some|times am I | king;
      <-          ,          ,         ,       ,       ,
        Then || treasons | make me | wish my|self a | beggar,
           ,      ,          ,        ,    ,
      And so | I am.| Then crush|ing pen|ury,
            ,      ,           ,        ,        ,
      Persuades | me, I | was bet|ter when | a king:
        ,            ,        ,         ,        ,
      Then am | I kinged | again:| and by | and by,
        ,          ,           ,         ,       ,
      Think that | I am | unkinged | by Bo|lingbroke,
              ,          ,         ,         ,       ,
      And straight | am noth|ing. But | whatere | I am,
          ,       ,     ,          ,         ,
      Nor I,| nor an|y man,| that but | man^is,
            ,         ,           ,            ,        ,
      With noth|ing shall | be pleased,| till he | be eased
            ,      ,         ,      ,       ,
      With be|ing noth|ing. mus|ic do | I hear?
            ,          ,          ,      ,    ,
      Ha*, ha?| Keep^time:| how sour | sweet mu/sic is,
             ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
      When time | is broke,| and no | propor|tion kept?
          ,       ,        ,            ,     ,
      So is | it in | the mus|ic of / men's lives:
            ,         ,         ,      ,        ,
      And here | have I | the dain|tiness | of ear,
           ,       ,    ,                ,          ,
      To check | time broke / in a | disord|ered string:
       ,             ,    ,            ,           ,
      But for | the con|cord of | my state | and time,
       ,     2      ,         ,         T    T    T
      Had not an | ear to | hear my | true time broke.
         ,        ,         ,           ,           ,
      I wast|ed time,| and now | doth time | waste^me:
           ,           ,          ,        ,    2      ,
      For now | hath time | made me | his num|bering clock;
             ,           ,         ,           ,           ,
      My thoughts,| are min|utes; and | with sighs | they jar,
             ,      2    ,   2       ,         ,         ,
      Their watch|es on^un|to mine^eyes,| the out|ward watch,
            ,       ,         ,       ,        ,
      Whereto | my fing|er, like | a di|al's point,
           ,         ,          ,          ,           ,
      Is poin|ting still,| in clean|sing them | from tears.
           ,          ,            ,            ,        ,
      Now sir,| the sound | that tells | what hour | it is,
           ,    2       ,              ,       ,         ,
      Are clam|orous groans,| which strike | upon | my heart,
             ,         ,         ,           ,            ,
      Which is | the bell:| so sighs,| and tears,| and groans,
             ,          ,           ,          ,     ,
      Show* min|utes, hours,| and times:| but my | time
      <-        ,         ,        ,        T      T    T
        Runs^||posting | on, in | Boling|broke's proud joy,
            ,          ,         ,          ,      2      ,
      While I | stand fool|ing here,| his Jack | o' the clock.
            ,       ,         ,         ,          ,
      This mus|ic mads | me, let | it sound | no more,
             ,                 ,   ,       ,           ,
      For though | it have / holp mad|men to | their wits,
          ,        ,                      ,   ,   ,
      In me | it seems,| it will make^//wise men mad:
            ,        ,         ,            ,         ,
      Yet bles|sing on | his heart | that gives | it me;
       ,      2      ,         ,           ,        ,
      For 'tis a | sign of | love, and | love to | Richard,
                ,       ,                ,   ,        ,
      Is a / strange brooch,| in this / all-hat|ing world.
 
[Enter a Groom of the Stable]
 
GROOM
       __     ,        __
      Hail | royal | prince.
 
KING RICHARD II
        __      ,       __
      Thanks | noble | peer,  (match prev)
            ,      2    ,       ,       T    T    T
      The chea|pest of us,| is ten | groats too dear.
        T   T    T     ,          ,           ,
      What art thou?| And how | comst thou | hither?
             ,        ,       ,                 ,   ,
      Where no | man nev|er comes,| but that / sad dog
              ,          ,         ,        ,         ,
      That brings | me food,| to make | misfor|tune live?
 
GROOM
      ,           ,      ,             ,         ,
      I was | a poor | groom of | thy stab|le (king)
             ,           ,         ,               ,      ,
      When thou | wert king:| who trav|elling / towards York,
             ,      ,         ,           ,        ,
      With much | ado,| at length | have got|ten leave
           ,     3  3      ,         ,       ,          ,
      To look | upon my (some|times roy|al) mast|er's face.
      ,             ,           ,          ,       ,
      O how | it yearned | my heart,| when I | beheld
          ,         ,            ,    ,       ,
      In Lon|don streets,| that co|rona|tion day,
            ,       ,       ,         ,   ,
      When Bol|ingbroke | rode on | roan Bar/bary,
             ,            ,        ,       ,         ,
      That horse,| that thou | so of|ten hast | bestrid,
             ,          ,        ,      ,           ,
      That horse,| that I | so care|fully | have dressed.
 
KING RICHARD II
        ,           ,    2     ,        ,         ,
      Rode he | on Bar|bary? Tell | me gent|le friend,
            ,        ,      ,
      How went | he und|er him?  \\
 
GROOM
           ,        ,    ,            ,            ,
      So proud|ly, as | if he | disdained | the ground.
 
KING RICHARD II
           ,           ,       ,          ,         ,
      So proud,| that Bo|lingbroke | was on | his back;
             ,          ,      ,              ,       ,
      That jade | hath eat | bread from | my roy|al hand.
             ,           ,          ,            ,        ,
      This hand | hath made | him proud | with clap|ping him.
        ,     2        ,         ,         T    T    T
      Would he not | stumble?| Would he | not fall down
               ,            ,        ,          ,           ,
      (Since^pride | must have | a fall)| and break | the neck
                  ,    ,          ,       ,          ,
      Of that / proud man,| that did | usurp | his back?
           ,         ,      ,           ,         ,
      Forgive|ness horse:| why do | I rail | on thee,
              ,       ,      ,        ,        ,
      Since thou | creat|ed to | be awed | by man
             ,         ,    ,             ,        ,
      Wast born | to bear?| I was | not made | a horse,
           ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      And yet | I bear | a burd|en like | an ass,
              ,           ,          ,        ,       ,
      Spur-galled,| and tired | by joun|cing Bo|lingbroke.
 
[Enter Keeper, with a dish]
 
KEEPER
       ,              ,       ,            ,       ,
      Fellow,| give^place,| here is | no long|er stay.
 
KING RICHARD II
       ,          ,              ,           ,      ,
      If thou | love me,| 'tis time | thou wert | away.
 
GROOM
                   ,     ,      ,               ,            ,
      What my / tongue dares | not, that | my heart | shall say.
 
[Exit]
 
KEEPER
           ,      T   T    T                ,   ,
      My lord,| will it please | you to / fall to?
 
KING RICHARD II
        ,             ,          ,          ,        ,
      Taste of | it first,| as thou | art wont | to do.
 
KEEPER
           ,        ,     ,            ,         ,
      My lord,| I dare | not: Sir | Pierce of | Exton,
            ,       ,        2      ,         ,        2    ,     2->
      Who late|ly came | from the king,| commands | the contra||ry.
 
KING RICHARD II
            x           ,    2    ,      ,          ,
      The devil | take^Hen|ry of Lan|caster,| and thee;
       ,              ,         ,       ,       x
      Patience | is stale,| and I | am wea|ry of it.
 
[Beats the keeper]
 
KEEPER
Help, help, help.
 
[Enter EXTON and Servants, armed]
 
KING RICHARD II
           ,      T    T     T       2       ,        ,
      How now?| What means death | in this rude | assault?
       ,      2        T    T     T            ,       ,    2
      Villain, thine^|own hand yields | thy death's | instrument,
 
[Snatching an axe from a Servant and killing him]
       ,              ,      ,        ,         ,
      Go thou | and fill | anoth|er room | in hell.
 
[He kills another. Then Exton strikes him down]
             ,            ,        ,       ,          ,
      That hand | shall burn | in nev|er-quen|ching fire,
             ,         ,          x      ,    2               ,
      That stag|gers thus | my person.| Exton, thy | fierce^hand,  ??
        ,      2         T     T       T       .     T    T    T
      Hath with the | king's blood, stained | the king's own land.
        T      T    .   T          ,        ,        ,
      Mount, mount my soul,| thy seat | is up | on high,
        ,           T     T     T       ,             2    ,
      Whilst my | gross flesh sinks | downward,| here* to die.
 
[Dies]
 
EXTON
           ,        ,       ,       ,       ,
      As full | of val|or, as | of roy|al blood,
        ,              ,       ,               ,           ,
      Both have | I spilled:| Oh would | the deed | were good.
           ,          x            ,       ,         ,
      For now | the devil,| that told | me I | did well,
        ,                 ,         ,      ,         ,
      Says, that | this deed | is chro|nicled | in hell.
             ,      ,            ,        ,           ,
      This dead | king to | the liv|ing king | I'll bear,
             ,           ,          ,          ,        ,
      Take hence | the rest,| and give | them bur|ial here.
 
[Exeunt]

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