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Richard II

Act V, Scene 2

The DUKE OF YORK's palace.
 
[Enter DUKE OF YORK and DUCHESS OF YORK]
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
           ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      My lord,| you told | me you would tell the rest,
            ,         ,          ,          ,      ,
      When wee|ping made | you break | the sto|ry off,
        2     ,     ,         ,        ,      ,
      Of our two | cousins | coming | into | London.
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,             ,
      Where did | I leave?
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                                      ,    ,         ,
                           At that / sad stop,| my lord,
              ,        ,          ,           ,          ,
      Where rude | misgo|verned hands,| from win|dows' tops,
               ,         ,              ,   ,           ,
      Threw* dust | and rub|bish on / King Ri|chard's head.
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,            ,          ,           ,       ,
      Then, as | I said,| the duke,| great^Bo|lingbroke,
        ,         ,       ,         ,       ,
      Mounted | upon | a hot | and fie|ry steed,
             ,      ,        ,        ,          ,
      Which his | aspi|ring ri|der seemed | to know,
             ,          ,        ,      ,              ,
      With slow,| but state|ly pace,| kept on | his course:
        .    T     T      T            ,          ,       ,
      While^all tongues cried,| God* save | thee Bo|lingbroke.
       ,                  ,           ,     ,         ,
      You would | have thought | the ve|ry win|dows spake,
          ,      ,       ,          ,          ,
      So ma|ny gree|dy looks | of young | and old,
                ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
      Through case|ments dar|ted their | desi|ring eyes
        ,         ,        ,          ,          ,
      Upon | his vi|sage: and | that all | the walls,
             ,       ,     ,         ,         ,
      With pain|ted im|agery | had said | at once,
       ,          ,            ,        ,       ,
      Jesu | preserve | thee, wel|come Bo|lingbroke.
              ,       2     ,      ,    2      ,        ,
      Whilst he,| from the one | side to the | other | turning,
        ,    x     ,                   T      T      T
      Bareheaded, lo//wer than his | proud steed's neck,
          ,            ,        ,           ,      ,
      Bespake | them thus:| I thank | you coun|trymen:
            ,           ,        ,          ,        ,
      And thus | still do|ing, thus | he passed | along.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
        ,          ,          ,            ,          ,
      Alas | poor Ri|chard, where | rides^he | the whilst?
 
DUKE OF YORK
          ,      ,    ,          ,        ,
      As in | a the|ater,| the eyes | of men,
       ,   2      T     T    T        ,           ,
      After a | well-graced ac|tor leaves | the stage,
           ,      ,        ,          ,        ,
      Are id|ly bent | on him | that en|ters next,
        ,              ,       ,       ,    ,
      Thinking | his prat|tle to | be te|dious;
      ,       ,              ,      ,        T      T     T
      Even | so, or | with much | more con|tempt, men's eyes
            ,         ,       ,         ,         ,              x
      Did scowl | on gen|tle Ri|chard: no | man cried,| God* save him: (hex with prev)
          ,         ,       ,             ,         ,
      No joy|ful tongue | gave him | his wel|come home,
            ,           ,       ,         ,        ,
      But dust | was thrown | upon | his sa|cred head,
        ,                ,       ,             ,    ,
      Which with | such gen|tle sor|row he / shook off,
            ,           ,      ,           ,            ,
      His face | still com|bating | with tears | and smiles
            ,       ,         ,          ,
      (The bad|ges of | his grief | and pat|ience)
      <-  ,      ,         ,           T     T    T           ,
        That || had not | God (for | some strong pur|pose) steeled
             ,         ,      ,             ,           ,
      The hearts | of men,| they must^per|force have | melted
           ,     ,   2    ,          ,       ,
      And bar|bari|sm itself | have pi|tied him.
           ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      But hea|ven hath | a hand | in these | events,
       .   T     T    T         ,           ,         ,
      To whose high will | we bound | our calm | contents.
          ,       ,                ,    ,          ,
      To Bo|lingbroke | are we / sworn sub|jects* now,
              ,          ,      ,        ,       ,
      Whose state,| and ho|nor, I | for aye | allow.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
             ,         ,        ,
      Here comes | my son | Aumerle.
 
DUKE OF YORK
                                        ,           ,
                                    Aumerle | that was,
            ,         ,         ,      ,            ,
      But that | is lost | for be|ing Ri|chard's friend.
           ,       ,           ,        ,        ,
      And ma|dam, you | must call  him Rut|land now:
         ,       ,       ,       ,               ,
      I am | in par|liament | pledge for | his truth,
           ,         ,                ,    ,    ,
      And las|ting feal|ty to the // new-made king.
 
[Enter DUKE OF AUMERLE]
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
       ,            ,     ,             ,   2    ,
      Welcome | my son:| who are | the vi|olets now,
             ,           ,       ,   2       T    T     T
      That strew | the green | lap of the | new come spring?
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
       ,          ,     ,      2      ,         ,
      Madam,| I know | not, nor I | greatly | care not,
            ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      God^knows,| I had | as lief | be none,| as one.
 
DUKE OF YORK
             ,          ,               ,     ,          ,
      Well bear | you well | in this / new spring | of time
        ,              ,          ,          ,        ,
      Lest you | be cropped | before | you come  to prime.
             ,          ,         ,            ,          ,         o ->
      What news | from Ox|ford? Hold | those justs | and tri||umphs?
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
            ,         ,         ,          ,
      For aught | I know,| my lord,| they do.
 
DUKE OF YORK
            ,         ,         ,
      You will | be there,| I know.
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
      <-    ,         ,      T   T  T        ,   oo   oo
        If God | prevent || not, I pur|pose so.|    |
 
DUKE OF YORK
             ,         ,           ,         ,          ,      ->
      What seal | is that,| that hangs | without | thy bo||som?
       ,       ,            ,      2      ,         ,
      Yea,| lookst thou | pale? Let me | see the | writing.
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
           ,          ,       2
      My lord,| 'tis no|thing.
 
DUKE OF YORK
                                   ,        ,            x
                               No mat|ter then | who sees it,
          ,        ,      ,       2    ,         ,       2->
      I will | be sa|tisfied,| let me see | the wri||ting.
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
         ,       ,            ,         ,       ,
      I do | beseech | your grace | to par|don me,
       ,         ,             ,    ,       ,
      It is | a mat|ter of / small con|sequence,
        ,           ,   ,        2         T    T    T
      Which for | some rea/sons I would | not have seen.
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,           ,   ,                 ,        ,
      Which for | some rea/sons sir,| I mean | to see.
          ,        ,
      I fear,| I fear.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                               ,           ,
                       What should | you fear?
      <-      ,       2      ,      ,           ,       ,         ,
        'Tis no||thing but some | bond, that | he is | entered | into
           ,       ,    2    ,          ,        ,
      For gay | appa|rel against | the tri|umph day.
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,             ,           ,     ,            ,
      Bound to | himself?| What doth | he with | a bond
            ,        ,           ,          ,        ,
      That he | is bound | to? Wife,| thou art | a fool.
       T    T   T    ,         ,
      Boy, let me | see the | writing.
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
      <-   ,        ,          ,       ,      ,            x
        I do || beseech | you par|don me,| I may | not show it.
 
DUKE OF YORK
          ,        ,      ,       2      x        ,
      I will | be sa|tisfied:| let me see it,| I say.
 
[He plucks it out of his bosom and reads it]
        ,         T     Tx      T          ,         ,
      Treason,| foul treason*, vil|lain, trai|tor, slave.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
        ,           ,            ,
      What's the | matter,| my lord?   (tri with after)
 
DUKE OF YORK
      __     ,         T   T      Tx          ,
      Ho,| who's with|in there? Saddle | my horse.
       ,             ,        ,      ,   2          ,
      God for | his mer|cy: what | treachery | is here?
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
       T     T   Tx          ,
      Why, what is it | my lord?  (tri with before)
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,            ,        ,     ,            ,
      Give me | my boots,| I say:| saddle | my horse:
       ,    2      ,           ,         ,
      Now by my | honor,| my life,| my troth,
      ,     2     ,          ,
      I will ap|peach the | villain.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                                      ,    2       ,
                                    What is the | matter?
 
DUKE OF YORK
       ___     ,         ,
      Peace | foolish | woman.  (cut off)
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                ,    ,       ,            ,       ,
      I will / not peace.| What is | the mat|ter son?
 
DUKE OF AUMERLE
            ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      Good mo|ther be | content,| it is | no more
          2     ,      ,          ,
      Than my poor | life must | answer.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                                              ,     ,
                                        Thy life | answer?
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,             ,         ,     ,           ,
      Bring me | my boots,| I will | unto | the king.
 
[Re-enter Servant with boots]
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
         ,             ,            ,          ,       ,
      Strike him | Aumerle.| Poor* boy,| thou art | amazed,
        ,    ,                 ,      ,            ,
      Hence vil/lain, ne|ver more | come in | my sight.
 
DUKE OF YORK
        ,            ,        ,
      Give me | my boots,| I say.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
            ,           ,          ,
      Why York,| what wilt | thou do?   (tri with prev)
             ,          ,          ,    ,              ,
      Wilt thou | not hide | the tres|pass of | thine^own?
        ,               ,        ,         ,         ,
      Have we | more* sons?| Or are | we like | to have?
          ,        ,         ,           ,          ,
      Is not | my tee|ming date | drunk^up | with time?
            ,           ,          ,     ,               ,
      And wilt | thou pluck | my fair | son from | mine^age,
           ,        ,      ,      ,          ,
      And rob | me of | a hap|py mo|ther's name?
          ,    T    T    T     T  T  T            ,  ->
      Is he | not like thee?| Is he not || thine^own?
 
DUKE OF YORK
        T    T   T     ,      oo
      Thou fond mad | woman,|
        ,              ,           ,        ,     ,
      Wilt thou | conceal | this dark | conspi|racy?
          x       2       ,           ,         ,      ,
      A dozen | of them here | have tane | the sa|crament,
           ,      ,            ,    ,            ,
      And in|terchange|ably / set down | their hands,
           ,          ,        ,
      To kill | the king | at Ox|ford.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                                       ,        2     ,
                                      He | shall be none;
              ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
      We'll keep | him here:| then what | is that | to him?
 
DUKE OF YORK
      . T    T    Tx        2     ,       ,         ,
      Away fond woman:| were he twen|ty times | my son,  ??
      ,             ,
      I would | appeach | him.
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
                                 ,             ,           ,
                               Hadst | thou groaned | for him
         ,          ,            ,           ,     ,  2
      As I | have done,| thou wouldst | be more | pitiful.
           ,        ,          ,           ,        ,
      But now | I know | thy mind;| thou dost | suspect
           ,          ,        ,      ,        ,
      That I | have been | disloy|al to | thy bed,
            ,        ,      ,         ,         ,
      And that | he is | a bas|tard, not | thy son:
               ,            ,         ,    ,              ,
      Sweet* York,| sweet* hus|band, be | not of | that mind:
       ,           ,      ,          ,         ,
      He is | as like | thee as | a man | may be,
            ,        ,       ,   3  3    ,
      Not like | to me,| nor a|ny of my kin,
      <-     ,        ,
        And yet || I love | him.
 
DUKE OF YORK
                                   ,     ,       ,      ,
                                 Make | way, un|ruly | woman.
 
[Exit]
 
DUCHESS OF YORK
       ,          ,       ,            ,          ,
      After | Aumerle.| Mount thee | upon | his horse;
        T    T    T     ,       ,          2      ,
      Spur post, and | get be|fore him | to the king,
           ,         ,       ,        ,      ,          ->
      And beg | thy par|don ere | he do | accuse || thee.
        ,       2     ,        ,           ,       ,
      I'll | not be long | behind:| though I | be old,
          ,      ,             ,         ,         ,
      I doubt | not but | to ride | as fast | as York:
            x         2    ,     ,     2         ,
      And never | will I rise | up from the | ground,
      <-         ,       ,           ,      2         ,         ,
        Till || Boling|broke have | pardoned thee:| Away | be gone.
 
[Exeunt]

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