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Richard II

Act II, Scene 1

Ely House.
 
[Enter JOHN OF GAUNT sick, with the DUKE OF YORK, etc.]
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
                   ,    ,         ,          ,           ,
      Will the / king come,| that I | may breathe | my last
           ,          ,                 ,  ,     ,
      In whole|some coun|sel to his // unstaid youth?
 
DUKE OF YORK
           ,          ,           ,      ,                 ,
      Vex^not | yourself,| nor strive | not with | your breath,
           ,         ,            ,            ,   ,
      For all | in vain | comes^coun|sel to / his ear.
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
       ,             ,           ,          ,      ,
      Oh but |(they say)| the tongues | of dy|ing men
          ,        ,         ,      ,   ,
      Enforce | atten|tion like | deep har/mony;
              ,            ,         2     ,        ,          ,
      Where words | are scarce,| they are sel|dom spent | in vain,
       .    T     T      T             ,              ,          ,
      For they breathe truth,| that breathe | their words | in pain.
           ,         ,          ,        ,          ,
      He that | no more | must say | is lis|tened more
             ,           ,           ,            ,          ,
      Than they | whom youth | and ease | have taught | to glose,
        ,                ,       ,                   ,         ,
      More are | men's^ends | marked, than | their lives | before,
           ,        ,         ,      ,         ,
      The set|ting sun,| and mu|sic is | the close
                 ,    ,           ,          ,         ,
      As the / last taste | of sweets,| is swee|test last.
        ,    2    ,            ,            T     T    T
      Writ in re|membrance | more than | things long past:
              ,               ,     ,        ,           ,
      Though Ri|chard my / life's coun|sel would | not hear,
       .    T     T    T         ,        ,         ,
      My death's sad tale,| may yet | undeaf | his ear.
 
DUKE OF YORK
       ,             ,           ,        ,    2       ,
      No, it | is stopped | with o|ther flat|tering sounds
           ,       ,         ,       ,                ,
      As prai|ses of | his state:| then there | are found
         ,    2    ,        ,          ,       ,
      Lasci|vious me|ters, to | whose^ve|nom sound
          ,      ,         ,           ,         x
      The o|pen ear | of youth | doth al|ways listen.
          ,        ,               ,   ,    ,
      Report | of fa|shions in / proud I|taly,
             ,         ,          ,     ,       ,      ->
      Whose^man|ners still | our tar|dy a|pish na||tion
        ,      ,           ,    ,    ,
      Limps | after | in base | imi|tation.
        ,       2        T      T     T        ,    ,
      Where doth the | world thrust forth | a va|nity,
          ,       ,             ,       ,           ,
      So it | be new,| there's^no | respect | how vile,
                 ,    ,         ,        ,         ,
      That is / not quick|ly buzzed | into | his ears?
            ,           ,            ,       ,        ,
      Then all | too* late | comes coun|sel to | be heard,
              ,          ,    ,          ,         ,
      Where will | doth mu|tiny | with wit's | regard:
          ,         ,           ,         ,            ,
      Direct | not him,| whose^way | himself | will choose,
              ,             ,           ,       ,                 ,
      'Tis breath | thou lackst,| and that | breath wilt | thou lose.
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
           ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      Methinks | I am | a pro|phet new | inspired
            ,       ,       ,         ,        ,
      And thus | expi|ring do | foretell | of him,
            ,       T     T    .  T     ,        ,
      His rash | fierce blaze of ri|ot can|not last,
           ,  2      ,       T    T   T           ,
      For vi|olent fires | soon burn out | themselves,
        T      Tx     T      ,            2      ,           ,
      Small showers last | long, but | sudden storms | are short,
           ,         ,            ,            ,        ,
      He tires | betimes,| that spurs | too* fast | betimes;
            ,      ,          ,           ,          ,       ->
      With ea|ger fee|ding, food | doth choke | the fee||der:
        ,      ,  2       ,   2    ,      ,
      Light | vanity,| insa|tiate cor|morant,
          ,        ,            ,       ,        ,
      Consu|ming means | soon preys | upon | itself.
            ,        ,          ,            ,          ,
      This roy|al throne | of kings,| this scep|tered isle,
             ,         ,    ,           ,         ,
      This earth | of ma|jesty,| this seat | of Mars,
           ,      ,       ,     ,     ,
      This o|ther E|den, de|mi-pa|radise,
            ,          ,         ,       ,         ,
      This for|tress built | by Na|ture for | herself,
          ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      Against | infec|tion, and | the hand | of war;
            ,       ,         ,          ,        ,
      This hap|py breed | of men,| this lit|tle world,
            ,          ,      ,            ,       ,
      This pre|cious stone,| set in | the sil|ver sea,
               ,         ,        ,       ,       ,
      Which serves | it in | the of|fice of | a wall,
          ,       ,       ,        ,       ,
      Or as | a moat | defen|sive to | a house,
          ,          ,           ,   ,   2     ,
      Against | the en|vy of / less hap|pier lands,
              ,        ,            ,             ,            ,
      This blessed | plot, this | earth, this | realm, this | England,
             ,           ,         ,        ,       ,
      This nurse,| this tee|ming womb | of roy|al kings,
         ,                ,          ,       ,            ,
      Feared by | their breed,| and fa|mous for | their birth,
         ,       ,            ,         ,           ,
      Renow|ned for | their deeds,| as far | from home,
            ,         ,                ,   ,      ,
      For Chris|tian ser|vice, and / true chi|valry,
       ,   2       ,      ,         ,         ,
      As is the | sepul|chre in | stubborn | Jewry
                  ,     ,         ,       ,       ,
      Of the / world's ran|som, bles|sed Ma|ry's Son.
             ,         ,            ,            ,            ,
      This land | of such | dear* souls,| this dear | dear* land,
        ,             ,    ,         ,            ,
      Dear for | her re|puta|tion through | the world,
          ,            ,       ,         ,        ,
      Is now | leased^out |(I die | pronoun|cing it)
        ,          ,     ,        ,         ,
      Like to | a te|nement | or pel|ting farm.
       ,          ,    ,                  ,        ,
      England | bound in / with the | trium|phant sea,
              ,      ,       T     T   .   T   2     ,
      Whose rock|y shore | beats back the^en|vious siege
          ,       ,               ,    ,       2       ,
      Of wa|tery Nep|tune*, is / now bound | in with shame,
            ,      ,          ,        ,          ,
      With in|ky blots,| and rot|ten parch|ment bonds.
            ,    ,       2        ,        ,        ,
      That Eng|land, that was | wont to | conquer | others,
             ,        ,        ,    ,            ,
      Hath made | a shame|ful con|quest of | itself.
       ,                ,       ,        ,         ,
      Ah! Would | the scan|dal va|nish with | my life,
           ,       ,          ,      ,       ,
      How hap|py then | were my | ensu|ing death?
 
[Enter KING RICHARD II and QUEEN, DUKE OF AUMERLE, BUSHY, GREEN, BAGOT, LORD ROSS, and LORD WILLOUGHBY]
 
DUKE OF YORK
            ,         ,           ,       ,          ,
      The king | is come,| deal mild|ly with | his youth,
       .    T    T    T       2     ,          ,          ,
      For young hot colts,| being raged,| do rage | the more.
 
QUEEN
            ,          ,      ,      ,      ,
      How fares | our no|ble un|cle Lan|caster?
 
KING RICHARD II
            ,        ,          x          ,       ,
      What com|fort man?| How is it | with a|ged Gaunt?
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
       ,    2         ,       ,        ,     ,
      Oh how that | name be|fits my | compo|sition:
            ,         ,          ,         ,      ,
      Old^Gaunt | indeed,| and gaunt | in be|ing old:
          ,         ,            ,       ,   2     ,
      Within | me grief | hath kept | a te|dious fast,
           ,         ,            ,               ,    ,
      And who | abstains | from meat | that is / not gaunt?
            ,        ,         ,      ,              ,
      For slee|ping Eng|land long | time have | I watched,
        ,           T     T   T      ,          2      ,
      Watching | breeds leanness,| leanness | is all gaunt:
            ,                ,   ,         ,      ,
      The plea|sure that / some fa|thers feed | upon,
       .  T    T     T        ,         ,           ,
      Is my strict fast,| I mean | my chil|dren's looks,
            ,       ,          ,           ,         ,
      And there|in fas|ting, hast | thou made | me gaunt:
        ,        ,             ,            ,       ,
      Gaunt am | I for | the grave,| gaunt^as | a grave,
             ,        ,       ,         ,           ,
      Whose hol|low womb | inhe|rits nought | but bones.
 
KING RICHARD II
            ,           ,         ,       ,            ,
      Can sick | men* play | so nice|ly with | their names?
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
       ,   ,                ,          ,        ,
      No, mi/sery | makes^sport | to mock | itself:
              ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      Since thou | dost seek | to kill | my name | in me,
          ,         ,            ,         ,        ,
      I mock | my name |(great^king)| to flat|ter thee.
 
KING RICHARD II
              ,      ,      ,        ,            ,
      Should dy|ing men | flat|ter those | that live?
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
            ,         ,        ,        ,           ,
      No*, no,| men* li|ving flat|ter those | that die.  ??
 
KING RICHARD II
            ,       ,        ,            ,         ,
      Thou now | a-dy|ing, sayst | thou flat|terst me.
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
          ,          x            ,         ,      ,
      Oh no,| thou diest,| though I | the sic|ker be.
 
KING RICHARD II
      ,            ,          ,         ,         ,
      I am | in health,| I breathe,| I see |thee ill.
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
           ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      Now he | that made | me knows | I see | thee ill:
       ,    2     ,        ,      2       T     Tx    T
      Ill in my|self to | see, and in | thee, seeing ill,  ??
            ,     ,           ,        ,          ,
      Thy death-|bed is | no les|ser than | the land,
            ,          x         ,    ,        ,
      Wherein | thou liest | in re|puta|tion sick;
            ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      And thou | too care|less pa|tient as | thou art,
           ,        2   ,       ,     ,         ,
      Commitst | thy anoin|ted bo|dy to | the cure
           ,         ,                 ,     ,        ,
      Of those | physi|cians, that / first woun|ded thee.
          ,         ,    2     ,        ,          ,
      A thou|sand flat|terers sit | within | thy crown,
             ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
      Whose^com|pass is | no big|ger than | thy head,
           ,       ,      ,        ,         ,
      And yet | enca|ged in | so small | a verge,
            ,         ,     ,   ,                   ,
      The waste | is no | whit les/ser than | thy land:
          ,          ,     ,            ,          ,
      Oh had | thy grand|sire with | a pro|phet's eye,
        ,              ,      ,                ,           ,
      Seen how | his son's | son, should | destroy | his sons,
             ,           ,          ,            ,          ,
      From forth | thy reach | he would | have laid | thy shame,
         ,        ,        ,           ,          ,
      Depo|sing thee | before | thou wert | possessed,
             ,          ,      ,           ,         ,
      Which^art | possessed | now to | depose | thyself.
            ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
      Why (cou|sin) wert | thou re|gent of | the world,
           ,        ,         ,           ,         ,
      It were | a shame | to let | this land | by lease:
       ,              ,        ,       ,           ,
      But for | thy world | enjoy|ing but | this land,
       ,            ,           ,          ,         ,
      Is it | not more | than shame,| to shame | it so?
        T   T   .  T        ,      ,               ,
      Landlord of Eng|land art | thou, and | not^king:
            ,         ,     .   T   T    T        ,
      Thy state | of law,| is bondslave to | the law,
       ,
      And--  (cut off)
 
KING RICHARD II
            ,       ,           ,   ,        ,
      And thou,| a lu|natic / lean-wit|ted fool,
          ,       ,      ,        ,      ,
      Presu|ming on | an a|gue's pri|vilege,
        ,               ,       ,    ,
      Darst with | thy fro|zen ad|moni|tion
      <-  ,       ,          ,       ,            ,       ,
        Make || pale our | cheek,| chasing | the roy|al blood
            ,       ,         ,       ,      ,
      With fu|ry, from | his na|tive re|sidence?
       ,    2        T     T    T      ,    ,
      Now by my | seat's right roy|al ma|jesty,
             ,         ,              ,    ,         ,
      Wert thou | not bro|ther to / great Ed|ward's son,
              ,            ,         ,       ,         ,
      This tongue | that runs | so round|ly in | thy head,
              ,          ,      ,     2    ,  2        ,
      Should run | thy head | from thy un|reverent | shoulders.
 
JOHN OF GAUNT
           ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Oh spare | me not,| my bro|ther Ed|ward's son,
            ,       ,         ,       ,         ,
      For that | I was | his fa|ther Ed|ward's son:
             ,        ,        ,         ,    ,
      That blood | alrea|dy (like | the pe|lican)
             ,            ,          ,      ,        ,
      Hast thou | tapped^out,| and drun|kenly | caroused.
          ,          ,           ,            ,         ,
      My bro|ther Glouce|ster, plain | well*-mea|ning soul
              ,        ,          x      2       ,       ,
      (Whom fair | befall | in heaven | amongst^hap|py souls)
            ,      ,      ,         ,         ,
      May* be | a pre|cedent | and wit|ness good
             ,         ,             ,        ,          ,
      That thou | respectst | not* spil|ling Ed|ward's blood:
        ,              ,         ,         ,        ,
      Join with | the pre|sent sick|ness that | I have,
           ,        ,        ,          ,       ,
      And thy | unkind|ness be | like croo|ked age,
           ,         ,    .  T    T   T           x
      To crop | at once | a too long wi|thered flower.
        ,             ,          ,          ,            ,
      Live in | thy shame,| but die | not shame | with thee,
              ,          ,      ,        ,        ,
      These words | hereaf|ter thy | tormen|tors be.
          ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      Convey | me to | my bed,| then to | my grave,
        ,              ,           ,         ,       ,
      Love they | to live,| that love | and ho|nor have.
 
[Exit, borne off by his Attendants]
 
KING RICHARD II
           ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      And let | them die | that age | and sul|lens have,
            ,           ,          ,        ,          ,
      For both | hast thou,| and both | become | the grave.
 
DUKE OF YORK
      ,   2     ,           ,  2        ,          ,
      I do be|seech your | majesty^|impute | his words
          ,         ,      ,         ,        ,
      To way|ward sick|liness | and age | in him:
           ,          ,        ,          ,           ,
      He loves | you on | my life,| and holds | you dear
          ,       ,         ,          ,         ,
      As Har|ry Duke | of Here|ford, were | he here.
 
KING RICHARD II
        ,                 ,         ,           ,        ,
      Right, you | say* true:| as Here|ford's love,| so his;
            ,          ,         ,        ,       ,
      As theirs,| so mine:| and all | be as | it is.
 
[Enter NORTHUMBERLAND]
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
           ,           ,          ,        3  3      ,    ,
      My liege,| old^Gaunt | commends | him to your ma|jesty.
 
KING RICHARD II
             ,
      What says | he?
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
                       ,     ,         T   T   T
                      Nay | nothing,| all is said:
             ,         ,         ,         ,       ,
      His tongue | is now | a string|less in|strument,
        T      T    .   T         ,      ,           ,
      Words, life, and all,| old Lan|caster | hath spent.
 
DUKE OF YORK
           ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
      Be York | the next | that must | be bank|rupt so,
               ,          ,         ,       ,       ,
      Though death | be poor,| it ends | a mor|tal woe.
 
KING RICHARD II
             x       T     T     T          ,         ,
      The ripest | fruit first falls,| and so | doth he;
            ,         ,          ,       ,          ,
      His time | is spent,| our pil|grimage | must be:
           ,          ,     ,            ,        ,
      So much | for that.| Now for | our I|rish wars,
           ,         ,             ,          ,        ,
      We must | supplant | those rough | rug^hea|ded kerns,
              ,          ,        ,         ,       ,
      Which live | like ve|nom, where | no ve|nom else
           ,      ,          ,      ,         ,
      But on|ly they,| have pri|vilege | to live.
           ,            ,         ,         ,            ,
      And for | these great | affairs | do ask | some charge
               ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      Towards^our | assis|tance we | do seize | to us
       .    T      T    T     ,         ,      ,
      The plate, coin, re|venues | and mo|veables,
            ,        ,       ,           ,           ,
      Whereof | our un|cle Gaunt | did stand | possessed.
 
DUKE OF YORK
            ,          ,       ,         ,         ,
      How long | shall I | be pa|tient? Oh | how long
             ,       ,      ,        ,        ,
      Shall ten|der du|ty make | me suf|fer wrong?
             ,            ,           ,          ,       ,
      Not Glouce|ster's death,| nor Here|ford's ba|nishment,
             ,          ,          ,          ,          ,
      Not Gaunt's | rebukes,| nor Eng|land's pri|vate wrongs,
       ,            ,              ,   ,       ,
      Nor the | preven|tion of / poor Bo|lingbroke,
         ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      About | his mar|riage, nor | my own | disgrace
           ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      Have e|ver made | me sour | my pa|tient cheek,
           ,     ,    ,               ,   2         ,
      Or bend | one wrin/kle on | my so|vereign's face.
      ,            ,        ,      ,          ,
      I am | the last | of no|ble Ed|ward's sons,
           ,         ,        ,           ,           ,
      Of whom | thy fa|ther Prince | of Wales | was first,
          ,         ,      ,      ,              ,
      In war | was ne|ver li|on raged | more* fierce,
           ,          ,      ,        ,           ,
      In peace | was ne|ver gen|tle lamb | more mild,
            ,           ,            ,       ,      ,
      Than was | that young | and prince|ly gen|tleman.
            ,           ,        ,      ,           ,
      His face | thou hast,| for e|ven so | looked^he
         ,            ,         ,         ,          ,
      Accom|plished with | the number of thy hours:
            ,          ,          ,        ,            ,
      But when | he frowned,| it was | against | the French,
           ,        ,            ,           ,       ,
      And not | against | his friends:| his no|ble hand
           ,          ,         ,           ,           ,
      Did win | what he | did spend | and spent | not that
             ,       ,         ,          ,         ,
      Which his | trium|phant fa|ther's hand | had won:
            ,            ,           ,  ,         ,
      His hands | were guil|ty of / no kin|dred blood,
            ,       ,        ,   2      ,        ,
      But bloo|dy with | the e|nemies^|of | his kin.
         ,          ,        ,           ,           ,
      O Ri|chard, York | is too | far* gone | with grief,
           ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      Or else | he ne|ver would | compare | between.
 
KING RICHARD II
           ,         ,          ,
      Why un|cle, what's | the mat|ter?
 
DUKE OF YORK
                                               ,         ,
                                        Oh | my liege,
       ,    2      ,          ,          T
      Pardon me | if you | please; if | not
      <- T    T        ,           ,          ,        ,          ,
         I pleased || not to | be par|doned, am | content | with all:
        ,             ,           ,     ,  2         ,
      Seek you | to seize,| and grip | into your | hands
      <-        ,      ,           ,         ,           ,
        The || royal|ties and | rights of | banished | Hereford?
       .  T    T     T          ,          ,         ,
      Is not Gaunt dead?| And doth | not Here|ford live?
       .   T    T     T         ,        ,       ,
      Was not Gaunt just?| And is | not Har|ry true?
           ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      Did not | the one | deserve | to have | an heir?
          ,          ,        ,      ,        ,
      Is not | his heir | a well-|deser|ving son?
             ,            ,       ,          ,           ,
      Take Here|ford's rights | away,| and take | from time
            ,         ,         ,     ,       ,
      His char|ters, and | his cus|toma|ry rights:
           ,       ,        ,       ,       ,
      Let not | tomor|row then | ensue | today,
          ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      Be not | thyself.| For how | art thou | a king
       ,         ,   ,                  ,
      But by | fair se/quence and | succes|sion?
      <- ,        ,     T    T   T   ,             ,
        Now || afore | God, God for|bid I | say* true,
          ,         ,             ,     ,           ,
      If you | do wrong|fully / seize Here|ford's right,
        ,            ,        ,         ,         ,
      Call in | the let|ters pat|ents that | he hath
          ,       ,        ,    ,        ,
      By his | attor|neys-ge|neral | to sue
           ,   x      2    ,        ,         ,
      His li|very, and de|ny his | offered | homage,
            ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      You pluck | a thou|sand dan|gers on | your head,
            ,        ,         ,       ,        ,
      You lose | a thou|sand well-|dispo|sed hearts
            ,         ,       ,         ,             ,
      And prick | my ten|der pa|tience to | those thoughts
             ,      ,       ,         ,        ,
      Which ho|nor and | alle|giance can|not think.
 
KING RICHARD II
        ,                ,         ,        ,         ,
      Think what | you will:| we seize | into | our hands,
            ,           ,          ,       ,          ,
      His plate,| his goods,| his mo|ney, and | his lands.
 
DUKE OF YORK
            ,        ,         ,          ,           ,
      I'll not | be by | the while:| my liege | farewell:
             ,       ,         ,             ,          ,
      What will | ensue | hereof,| there's^none | can tell:
           ,    ,    ,                ,      ,
      But by | bad cour/ses may | be un|derstood
             ,        ,           x       T   T    T
      That their | events | can never | fall out good.
 
[Exit]
 
KING RICHARD II
          ,      ,         ,         ,            ,
      Go Bu|shy to | the Earl | of Wilt|shire straight,
       ,            ,        ,      ,      ,
      Bid him | repair | to us | to E|ly House,
          ,          ,     ,       ,        ,
      To see | this bus|iness:| Tomor|row next
           ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      We will | for Ire|land; and |'tis time,| I trow:
           ,       ,        ,        ,        ,
      And we | create | in ab|sence of | ourself
           ,       ,      ,   ,   2          ,
      Our un|cle York,| lord go/vernor of | England:
           ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      For he | is just | and al|ways loved | us well.
            ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      Come^on | our queen,| tomor|row must | we part,
          ,       ,          ,         ,         ,
      Be mer|ry, for | our time | of stay | is short.
 
[Flourish. Exeunt KING RICHARD II, QUEEN, DUKE OF AUMERLE, BUSHY, GREEN, and BAGOT]
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
             ,           ,        ,      ,         ,
      Well lords,| the Duke | of Lan|caster | is dead.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,       ,         ,         ,         ,
      And li|ving too,| for now | his son | is duke.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
        ,          ,       ,        ,    ,
      Barely | in ti|tle, not | in re|venue.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
        ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      Richly | in both,| if jus|tice had | her right.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,          ,      ,    2         ,           ,
      My heart | is great:| but it must | break with | silence,
       ,        ,      ,             2   ,   2      ,
      Ere it | be dis|burdened | with a li|beral tongue.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
             ,           ,         ,          ,            ,
      Nay* speak | thy mind:| and let | him nere | speak^more
              ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      That speaks | thy words | again | to do | thee harm.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
        ,              ,      ,                ,         ,
      Tends that | thou'dst speak / to the | Duke of | Hereford,
          ,       ,    ,              ,      ,
      If it | be so,| out with | it bold|ly man,
        ,              ,         ,         ,             ,
      Quick is | mine ear | to hear | of good | towards^him.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      No good | at all | that I | can do | for him,
          ,          ,         ,        ,     ,
      Unless | you call | it good | to pi|ty him,
          ,         ,   ,    2       ,     ,
      Bereft | and gel|ded of his | patri|mony.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
       T  .  T    Tx            ,             ,           ,
      Now afore heaven,| 'tis shame | such wrongs | are borne.
          ,       ,        ,          ,      ,
      In him | a roy|al prince,| and ma|ny more
          ,       ,          ,       ,         ,
      Of no|ble blood | in this | decli|ning land;
            ,        ,         ,          ,      ,
      The king | is not | himself,| but base|ly led
           ,      ,          ,           ,        ,
      By flat|terers,| and what | they will | inform
        ,           ,     2      ,     ,       ,
      Merely | in hate | against^a|ny of | us all,
             ,          ,        ,      ,      ,
      That will | the king | severe|ly pro|secute
       2       ,         ,           ,         ,          ,
      Against^us,| our lives,| our chil|dren, and | our heirs.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,         ,         ,            ,        ,     ->
      The com|mons hath | he piled | with grie|vous tax||es,
              ,     ,             ,            x         2     ,
      And / quite lost | their hearts:| the nobles | hath he fined
           ,         ,       2      ,       T    T      T
      For an|cient quar|rels, and quite | lost their hearts.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
           ,      ,       ,        ,        ,
      And dai|ly new | exac|tions are | devised,
            ,        ,   2   ,       2   ,          ,
      As blanks,| bene|volences,| and I wot | not what:
            ,         ,       ,             ,         ,
      But what | of God's | name doth | become | of this?
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
        ,          ,   ,                  ,       2      ,
      Wars have | not was/ted it,| for warred | he hath not,
            ,       ,         ,   ,       ,
      But base|ly yiel|ded u/pon com|promise
        ,       2        Tx   T T      2    ,             ,
      That which his | noble ances|tors achieved | with blows:
        ,              ,          ,            ,         ,
      More hath | he spent | in peace | than they | in wars.
 
LORD ROSS
            ,         ,          ,          ,          ,
      The Earl | of Wilt|shire hath | the realm | in farm.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
             ,       T     T   T        2   ,       ,
      The king's | grown bankrupt,| like^a bro|ken man.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
           ,          ,     ,        ,      ,       ,  ->
      Reproach | and dis|solu|tion hang|eth o||ver him.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,         ,    3   3      ,        ,
      He hath | not mo|ney for these I|rish wars:
           ,    2     ,  ,         ,        ,
      (His bur|denous tax|ations | notwith|standing)
       ,            ,        ,        ,          ,
      But by | the rob|bing of | the ba|nished duke.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
           ,       ,         ,       ,   2      ,
      His no|ble kins|man, most | dege|nerate king:
            ,          ,           ,       ,         ,
      But lords,| we hear | this fear|ful tem|pest sing,
           ,         ,       ,      ,          ,
      Yet see | no shel|ter to | avoid | the storm:
          ,     .    T   T    T      ,          ,
      We see | the wind sit sore | upon | our sails,
           ,          ,      ,      2     ,       ,
      And yet | we strike | not, but se|curely | perish.
 
LORD ROSS
          ,         ,      ,           ,           x
      We see | the ve|ry wrack | that we | must suffer,
           ,   ,       ,        ,       ,
      And un|avoi|ded is | the dan|ger now
           ,          ,        ,       ,         ,
      For suf|fering so | the cau|ses of | our wrack.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
           ,   ,             2     ,        ,         ,
      Not so:| even | through the hol|low eyes | of death
         ,      ,   ,                  ,         ,
      I spy | life pee/ring: but | I dare | not say
            ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
      How near | the ti|dings of | our com|fort is.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
       ,             ,             ,           ,           ,
      Nay let | us share | thy thoughts,| as thou | dost ours.
 
LORD ROSS
          ,      ,         ,          ,       ,
      Be con|fident | to speak | Northum|berland,
           ,          ,         ,          ,        ,
      We three,| are but | thyself,| and spea|king so,
            ,          ,           ,             ,         ,
      Thy words | are but | as thoughts,| therefore | be bold.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
             ,        ,           ,         ,        ,
      Then thus:| I have | from Port | le Blanc | a bay
           ,     ,        ,        ,      ,
      In Brit|tany,| received | intel|ligence
            ,       ,         ,         ,      2      ,      ->
      That Har|ry Duke | of Here|ford, Rai|nold Lord^Cob||ham,
               ,    ,         2      ,        ,   ,
      That / late broke | from the Duke | of Ex|eter,
           ,         ,   ,         ,        ,    3 3
      His bro|ther Arch|bishop | late of | Canterbury,
           ,       ,      ,          ,     ,
      Sir Tho|mas Er|pingham,| Sir John | Ramston,
         2      ,    3  3     ,       ,   3   3      ,         ,
      Sir John^Nor|bery, Sir Ro|bert Wa|terton and Fran|cis Quoint,  ??
            ,       ,   ,           2        ,        ,
      All these | well fur/nished by the | Duke of | Britain,
             T     T    T              ,        ,        ,
      With^eight tall ships,| three* thou|sand men | of war,
           ,       ,     2      ,     ,      ,  2
      Are ma|king hi|ther with all | due ex|pedience,
            ,        ,         ,          ,          ,
      And short|ly mean | to touch | our nor|thern shore:
           ,          ,          ,          ,           ,
      Perhaps | they had | ere this,| but that | they stay
            ,        ,    ,    2        ,         ,
      The first | depar|ting of the | king for | Ireland.
           ,                 ,    ,         ,         ,
      If then | we shall / shake off | our sla|vish yoke,
           ,          ,         ,         ,        ,
      Imp^out | our droo|ping coun|try's bro|ken wing,
          ,          ,         ,         ,           ,
      Redeem | from bro|king pawn | the ble|mished crown,
            ,          ,           ,           ,          ,
      Wipe^off | the dust | that hides | our scep|ter's gilt
       .    T    T   T    ,      ,            ,
      And make high ma|jesty | look like^|itself,
        ,          ,        ,        ,       ,
      Away | with me | in post | to Ra|venspurgh,
           ,         ,         ,             ,  ,
      But if | you faint,| as fea|ring to / do so,
        ,             ,        ,        ,          ,
      Stay, and | be se|cret, and | myself | will go.
 
LORD ROSS
           ,          ,       T     T    .   T           ,
      To horse,| to horse,| urge doubts to them | that fear.
 
LORD WILLOUGHBY
            ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Hold^out | my horse,| and I | will first | be there.
 
[Exeunt]

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