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Henry VIII

Act I, Scene 1

An ante-chamber in the palace.
 
[Enter NORFOLK at one door; at the other, BUCKINGHAM and ABERGAVENNY]
 
BUCKINGHAM
            ,               ,   ,     ,              ,
      Good mor|row, and / well met.| How have | ye done
              ,        ,          ,
      Since last | we saw | in France?
 
NORFOLK
                                           ,            ,
                                       I thank | your grace:
        ,             ,       ,         ,        ,     2->
      Healthful,| and ev|er since | a fresh | admi||rer
           ,       ,      ,
      Of what | I saw | there.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                 2     T  . T T
                               An un|timely^ague
         ,           ,    2    ,        ,         ,
      Stayed me | a pris|oner in | my chamb|er, when
              ,        ,              ,     ,         ,
      Those suns | of glo|ry, those^/two lights | of men
       ,    2        ,        ,
      Met in the | vale of | Andren.
 
NORFOLK
                                       T      T    .    T
                                    'Twixt Guynes and^Arde,  ??
      ,             ,         ,        2    ,   ,   ,    ,
      I was | then pres|ent, saw | them salute on horseback,  ????
          ,            ,           ,        ,           ,
      Beheld | them, when | they light|ed, how | they clung
       ,      2     ,          ,          ,      ,
      In their em|bracement,| as they | grew to|gether,
             ,         ->
      Which^had | they,
               ,     ,        ,                  ,
      What / four throned | ones could | have weighed
        ,           ,       ,
      Such a | compoun|ded one?
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                T   .    T     T
                               All the whole time
      ,            ,         ,    2
      I was | my chamb|er's pris|oner.
 
NORFOLK
                                        ,          ,
                                      Then | you lost
            ,         ,       ,       ,           ,
      The view | of earth|ly glo|ry: men | might say
                     ,    ,         ,              ,   ,       2->
      Till* this / time pomp | was sing|le, but / now mar||ried
          ,       ,        ,          ,    2     ,
      To one | above | itself.| Each^fol|lowing day
          ,          ,      ,    ,                    ,
      Became | the next | day's mas/ter, till | the last
            ,       ,         ,       ,           ,
      Made^form|er wond|ers, its.| Today | the French,
             ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      All* clin|quant^all | in gold,| like hea|then gods
        T     T   .   T         ,       ,         ,
      Shone down the^Eng|lish; and | tomor|row, they
            ,         ,  2    ,      ,           ,
      Made^Bri|tain, In|dia: eve|ry man | that stood,
         T     T  .   T            ,        ,       ,
      Showed like a mine.| Their dwar|fish pag|es were
          ,      ,     T    T    .   T       ,
      As che|rubins,| all gilt: the mad|ams too,
            ,         ,         ,        ,          ,
      Not^used | to toil,| did al|most sweat | to bear
            ,       ,            ,           ,     ,     ->
      The pride | upon | them, that | their ve|ry la||bor
       ,         ,      2    ,         ,            ,
      Was | to them,| as a pain|ting. Now | this masque
            ,        ,    2  ,       3   3   ,       ,
      Was cried | incom|parable;| and the ensu|ing night
        ,           ,         ,              ,    ,
      Made it | a fool,| and beg|gar. The / two kings
       ,   2      ,             ,      T    T    T
      Equal in | luster,| were now | best, now worst
          ,         ,         ,           ,        ,
      As pres|ence did | present | them: him | in eye,
        T    T   .    T          ,      ,         ,
      Still him in praise,| and be|ing pres|ent both,
              ,          ,         ,         ,       ,      ->
      'Twas said | they saw | but one,| and no | discer||ner
        ,      ,           ,         ,            2        ,
      Durst | wag his | tongue in | censure,| when these^suns
            ,           ,          ,          ,         ,         2->
      (For so | they phrase |'em) by | their her|alds chal||lenged
           ,        x           ,          ,         ,
      The nob|le spirits | to arms,| they did | perform
       .  T      T      T                ,        ,        ,
      Beyond thought's comp|ass, that | former | fabulous story   ????
        2    ,      ,    ,       2    ,           ,
      Being now | seen, pos/sible e|nough, got | credit
            ,      ,         ,
      That Be|vis was | believed.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                     ,         ,
                                 Oh you | go* far.
 
NORFOLK
         ,       ,        ,         ,        ,
      As I | belong | to worsh|ip, and | affect
          ,       ,    ,          ,         ,     2    ->
      In hon|or, hon|esty,| the tract | of ev||erything
        ,       2    ,         ,        ,           ,
      Would | by a good | discour|ser lose | some life,
             ,          ,           ,
      Which ac|tion's self,| was tongue | to.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                               ,         ,     ->
                                              All | was roy||al,
       ,      2    ,       ,         ,          ,
      To | the dispo|sing of | it nought | rebelled,
       ,   2        T    T     T         ,       ,
      Order gave^|each thing view.| The of|fice did
           ,              ,    ,         ,          ,
      Distinct|ly his / full func|tion: Who | did guide,
          ,         ,         ,      ,          ,
      I mean | who set | the bo|dy, and | the limbs
                  ,     ,        ,
      Of this / great sport | togeth|er?
 
NORFOLK
                                          ,         ,
                                         As | you guess:
       ,   ,               ,         ,    , 2
      One cer/tes, that | promi|ses no | element*
           ,       ,       2
      In such | a bus|iness.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                 ,         ,         ,
                             I pray | you who,| my lord?
 
NORFOLK
       ,      2       ,         ,         ,       ,
      All this was | ordered | by the | good di|scretion
                 ,    ,   2     ,     ,         ,
      Of the / right rev|erend Car|dinal | of York.
 
BUCKINGHAM
            x       ,          T   T    T         ,
      The devil | speed him:| no man's pie | is freed
            ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
      From his | ambi|tious fing|er. What | had he
          ,     2         ,      ,     ,        ,
      To do | in these fierce | vani|ties? I | wonder,
             ,        ,      ,              ,      ,
      That such | a keech | can with | his ve|ry bulk
            ,         ,      2     ,    ,       ,
      Take^up | the rays | of the be|nefi|cial sun,
            ,         ,          ,
      And keep | it from | the earth.
 
NORFOLK
                                       ,      ___
                                     Surely | sir,
               ,         ,            ,     ,               ,
      There's^in | him stuff,| that puts | him to | these^ends:
           ,    2       ,          ,     ,            ,
      For be|ing not propped | by an|cestry,| whose^grace
         ,         ,              ,           ,       ,
      Chalks suc|cessors | their way;| nor called | upon
       .    T    T     T      2      ,      ,         ,
      For high feats done | to the crown;| neither | allied
          ,     ,       ,          ,     ,       __
      For e|minent | assis|tants; but | spider-|like
       ,             ,     ,        ,         ,         __
      Out of | his self-|drawing | web. O | gives us | note,  (hex with prev)
            ,               ,   ,       ,          ,
      The force | of his / own mer|it makes | his way
          ,                   ,          ,            ,
      A gift | that heav|en gives | for him,| which buys
          ,       ,             ,
      A place | next to | the king.
 
ABERGAVENNY
                                      ,        ,
                                   I can|not tell
              x            x           ,          ,       ,
      What heaven | hath given | him: let | some gra|ver eye
         ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      Pierce in|to that,| but I | can see | his pride
        ,                  ,                ,    ,         ,
      Peep through^|each part | of him:/ whence has | he that,
          ,           ,          x      ,      ,
      If not | from hell?| The devil | is a | niggard,
        2     ,      ,        ,         ,       ,
      Or has giv|en all | before,| and he | begins
         ,      ,             ,
      A new | hell | in him/self.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                   ,          x
                                  Why | the devil,
        ,            ,       2    ,      ,    2   ,
      Upon | this French | going^out,| took he u|pon him  ??
            ,         ,    ,      2      ,      2    ,
      (Without | the pri|vity | of the king)| to appoint
       ,               ,        ,         ,       2      ,
      Who should | attend | on him?| He makes | up the file
          ,         ,        ,     .    T    T    T
      Of all | the gen|try; for | the most part such
           ,         ,          ,         ,       ,     2->
      To whom | as great | a charge,| as lit|tle ho||nor
           ,         ,      ,       2     ,     ,
      He meant | to lay | upon:| and his own | letter
           ,    ,       ,          ,        ,
      The hon|ora|ble board | of coun|cil, out
             ,          ,        ,
      Must fetch | him in,| the pap|ers.
 
ABERGAVENNY
                                         ,        ,
                                         I | do know
       ,             ,      ,              ,            ,
      Kinsmen | of mine,| three at | the least,| that have
           ,         ,         ,         ,           ,     ->
      By this,| so sick|ened their | estates,| that ne||ver
        ,         2   ,         ,      ,
      They | shall abound | as form|erly.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                             ,    2->
                                          O ma||ny
             ,             ,           ,       ,        x     
      Have broke | their backs | with lay|ing ma|nors on 'em
                   ,     ,         ,       2      ,    ,
      For this / great journ|ey. What | did this van|ity
           ,     ,        ,    ,       ,
      But min|ister | commu|nica|tion of
      .   T    T   T
      A most poor is|sue?
 
NORFOLK
                            ,       ,       ,
                          griev|ingly | I think,
            ,         ,            ,          ,        ,      2->
      The peace | between | the French | and us,| not val||ues
            ,          ,         ,
      The cost | that did | conclude | it.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                            ,      ,
                                           eve|ry man,
       ,           ,   2     ,           ,          ,
      After | the hi|deous storm | that fol|lowed, was
          ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
      A thing | inspired,| and not | consul|ting, broke
       ,  2     ,  2      ,      ,      2        ,
      Into a | general | prophe|cy; That this | tempest
        ,            ,        ,          ,       ,     2->
      Dashing | the gar|ment of | this peace,| abo||ded
           ,         ,       x
      The sud|den breach | on it.
 
NORFOLK
                                              ,       ,
                                  Which | is bud|ded out,
             ,             ,            ,           ,         ,
      For France | hath flawed | the league,| and hath | attached
           ,            ,       2      ,
      Our merch|ants' goods | at Bourdeaux.
 
ABERGAVENNY
                                            ,        ,
                                           Is it | therefore,
         2   ,     ,        ,
      The ambas|sador | is sil|enced?
 
NORFOLK
                                       ,       x
                                      Mar|ry is it.
 
ABERGAVENNY
         ,       ,      ,       ,          ,         ->
      A prop|er tit|le of | a peace,| and pur||chased
       ,    2   ,     2     ,
      At | a super|fluous rate.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                    ,          ,        2->
                               Why all | this bus||iness
           ,   2     ,         ,
      Our rev|erend car|dinal car|ried.
 
NORFOLK
                                          ,      2       ,
                                        Like | it your grace,
            ,       ,    ,        2       ,         ,   2
      The state | takes no/tice of the | private | difference
          ,      ,      2       ,   2     ,      ,
      Betwixt | you, and the | cardinal.| I ad|vise you
             ,         ,        ,            ,        ,          ->
      (And take | it from | a heart,| that wish|es towards || you
       ,    2      ,    2     ,        ,          ,
      Hon|or and plent|eous safe|ty) that | you read
           ,    2      ,        ,         ,     ,
      The car|dinal's mal|ice, and | his po|tency
         ,        ,       ,      ,          ,
      Togeth|er; to | consid|er furth|er, that
            ,      ,   ,                  ,           ,
      What his | high ha/tred would | effect,| wants^not
         ,         ,         x           ,         ,      ->
      A min|ister in | his power.| You know | his na||ture,
        ,        2    ,         ,        ,          ,
      That | he's revenge|ful; and | I know,| his sword
                 ,     ,           ,       2    ,         ,
      Hath a / sharp edge:| it's long,| and it may | be said,
          ,        ,          ,            ,        ,
      It rea|ches far,| and where |'twill not | extend,
       ,     2       ,         ,       ,        ,
      Thither he | darts it.| Bosom | up my | counsel,
               ,         ,          ,           ,            ,
      You'll find | it whole|some. Lo,| where comes | that rock
           ,       ,           ,
      That I | advise | your shun|ning.  \\
 
[Enter CARDINAL WOLSEY, the purse borne before him, certain of the Guard, and two Secretaries with papers. CARDINAL WOLSEY in his passage fixeth his eye on BUCKINGHAM, and BUCKINGHAM on him, both full of disdain]
 
CARDINAL WOLSEY
            ,         ,       ,         ,       ,
      The Duke | of Buck|ingham's | survey|or? Ha?
         ,       2   ,    ,
      Where's his ex|ami|nation?
 
FIRST SECRETARY
                                   ,          ,
                                 Here so | please you.
 
CARDINAL WOLSEY
       ,   2      ,        ,
      Is he in | person,| ready?
 
FIRST SECRETARY
                                  T      T     .    T
                                 Aye, please your grace.
 
CARDINAL WOLSEY
        ,                ,            ,          ,      ,
      Well, we | shall then | know* more,| and Buck|ingham
             ,              ,    ,
      Shall les|sen this / big look.  \\
 
[Exeunt CARDINAL WOLSEY and his Train]
 
BUCKINGHAM
            ,          ,        ,        ,          ,
      This butch|er's cur | is ven|om-mouthed,| and I
            ,          x           x             ,         ,
      Have not | the power | to muzzle | him, there|fore best
            ,     ,    2        ,          ,          ,
      Not wake | him in his | slumber.| A beg|gar's book,
            ,        ,         ,
      Outworths | a nob|le's blood.
 
NORFOLK
                                      ,               ,
                                    What are | you chafed?
           ,         ,    2         ,        2   ,        ,    ->
      Ask God | for temp|erance, that's | the appli|ance on||ly
        ,         2    ,          ,
      Which | your disease | requires.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                          ,      2      ,
                                      I read | in his looks
       ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      Matter | against | me, and | his eye | reviled
          ,        ,       ,        ,         ,       2->
      Me as | his ab|ject ob|ject, at | this in||stant
           ,                 ,    ,            ,      2      ,
      He bores | me with / some trick;| he's gone | to the king:
            ,              ,   ,
      I'll fol|low, and / outstare | him.
 
NORFOLK
                                            ,         ,
                                          Stay | my lord,
           ,          ,        ,          ,        ,       2->
      And let | your reas|on with | your cho|ler ques||tion
             ,         ,      ,     .   T     T     T
      What 'tis | you go | about:| to climb steep hills
           ,       T    T   .   T      ,           ,
      Requires | slow pace at first:| anger | is like
      .   T   T    T      ,    2         ,          ,
      A full-hot horse,| who being | allowed | his way
        T    Tx     T           ,       ,        ,       ->
      Self-mettle tires | him: Not | a man | in Engl||and
       ,        ,              ,    ,     2      ,
      Can | advise | me like^/you: be | to yourself,
       ,         ,                ,
      As you | would to | your friend.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                         ,             ,
                                       I'll to | the king,
       ,      2      ,         ,        T    T    T
      And from a | mouth of | honor,| quite cry down
            ,        ,         ,     ,       2     ,
      This Ip|swich fel|low's in|solence;| or proclaim,
               ,    2           ,  ,
      There's^dif|ference in / no pers|ons.
 
NORFOLK
                                             ,       ,
                                            Be | advised;
        ,     2     ,         ,          T   T  T
      Heat not a | furnace | for your | foe so hot
            ,        ,           ,        ,        ,
      That it | do singe | yourself.| We may | outrun
          ,   2     ,          ,      ,         ,
      By vi|olent swift|ness that | which we | run at;
            ,       ,      ,          ,         ,
      And lose | by ov|er-run|ning: Know | you not,
            ,            ,          ,         x          ,
      The fire | that mounts | the li|quor til it | run^ore,
          ,                  x       ,    ,     2    ,
      In seem|ing to aug/ment it, wastes it:| Be advised;
         ,       ,      ,            ,         ,
      I say | again | there is | no Eng|lish soul
             ,        ,       ,          ,          ,
      More strong|er to | direct | you than | yourself;
       ,             ,        ,       ,             ,
      If with | the sap | of reas|on you | would quench,
          ,       ,          ,        ,
      Or but | allay | the fire | of pas|sion.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                                 ,
                                                Sir,
       2     ,        ,         ,          ,      ,
      I am thank|ful to | you, and | I'll go | along
       ,     2      ,          ,          T    T    T      ->
      By your pre|scription:| but this | top-proud fel||low,
        ,        2      ,         ,        ,     ,
      Whom | from the flow | of gall | I name | not, but
            ,    ,   ,                ,      ,
      From sin|cere mo/tions, by | intel|ligence,
             ,          ,           ,            ,    ,
      And proofs | as clear | as founts | in Ju/ly, when
          ,           ,         ,       ,        ,
      We see | each grain | of gra|vel; I | do know
          ,        ,          ,      ,
      To be | corrupt | and treas|onous.
 
NORFOLK
       T   T    T      ,    oo
      Say not treas|onous.|     (tetra with prev)
 
BUCKINGHAM
        2      ,            x           ,         ,           ,
      To the king | I'll say it,| and make | my vouch | as strong
           ,          ,        ,          ,     ,
      As shore | of rock:| attend.| This ho|ly fox,
           ,         ,     ,    2     ,        ,      2 ->
      Or wolf,| or both |(for he is | equal | rave||nous
       ,     2      x        2     ,         ,    ,
      As | he is subtle,| and as prone | to mis|chief,
      <-      ,        2       x           ,          ,
        As || able | to perform it)| his mind,| and place
      <-   ,         ,      ,        ,       ,      x
        Infec||ting one | anoth|er, yea | recip|rocally,  ????
       ,  2       ,          ,          ,          ,
      Only to | show his | pomp, as | well in | France,
      <-        ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
        As || here at | home, sug|gests the | king our | master
        2       ,      ,        ,           ,      ,
      To this last | costly | treaty:| the in|terview,
             ,       2     ,      ,              ,        ,
      That swal|lowed so much | treasure,| and like | a glass
            ,       2      ,
      Did break | in the rin|sing.
 
NORFOLK
                                     ,          ,       ,
                                   Faith,| and so | it did.
 
BUCKINGHAM
        ,      2      ,       ,           ,         ,   2
      Pray give^me | favor | sir: This | cunning | cardinal
           ,     ,      2     ,     ,        ,
      The art|icles | of the com|bina|tion drew
               ,     ,            ,          ,     ,
      As him/self pleased;| and they | were ra|tified
                ,     ,         ,             ,   ,
      As he / cried thus | let be,| to as / much end,
           ,         ,       2      ,       2      ,     ,   2
      As give | a crutch | to the dead.| but our count-|cardinal
            ,           ,          ,         ,       ,      ->
      Has done | this, and |'tis well:| for worth|y Wol||sey
            ,       ,          x            ,     ,
      (Who can|not err)| he did it:| Now* this | follows,
         ,            ,         ,       ,        ,     ->
      (Which as | I take | it, is | a kind | of pup||py
        2       ,   ,     ,           ,           ,  2
      To the / old dam | treason)| Charles the | emperor,
       ,       T   T    .  T          ,           ,
      Under | pretense to see | the queen | his aunt,
              ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      (For 'twas | indeed | his col|or, but | he came
           ,       ,         ,           ,    ,       ->
      To whis|per Wol|sey) here | makes vis|ita||tion,
       ,      ,              2     ,      ,        ,
      His | fears were*| that the in|terview | betwixt
       ,     2         T      T      T            ,    ,
      England and | France, might through | their a|mity,
        ,               ,      ,          ,            ,
      Breed him | some pre|judice;| for from | this league,
         T     T     .   T        ,        ,    ,
      Peeped harms that men|aced him.| He pri|vily
        ,               ,    2     ,      2    ,
      Deals with | our car|dinal, and | as I trow
      <-  ,             ,        ,        ,         ,    ,
        Which I || do well;| for I | am sure | the emp|eror
        ,     2      ,               ,         ,          ,      ->
      Paid ere he | promised,| whereby | his suit | was gran||ted
       ,      2      ,           ,         ,          ,
      Ere | it was asked.| But when | the way | was made
            ,            ,         ,   2     ,        ,
      And paved | with gold:| the emp|eror thus | desired,
            ,            ,         ,              ,      ,
      That he | would please | to alt|er the / king's course,
            ,           ,          ,                  ,    ,
      And break | the fore|said* peace.| Let* the / king know,
            ,         ,         ,          ,         ,     3  3->
      (As soon | he shall | by me)| that thus | the car||dinal
            ,          ,         ,      ,        ,      ->
      Does buy | and sell | his hon|or as | he plea||ses,
       ,       2     ,       ,
      And | for his own | advant|age.
 
NORFOLK
                                     ,       ,     2->
                                     I | am sor||ry
           ,               ,    ,            ,     ,
      To hear | this of / him; and | could wish | he were
        ,            ,        x
      Something | mistak|en in it.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                    ,     2     ,   2
                                   No, not a | syllable:
         ,        ,           ,         ,      ,
      I do | pronounce | him in | that ve|ry shape
       ,             ,         ,
      He shall | appear | in proof.  \\
 
[Enter BRANDON, a Sergeant-at-arms before him, and two or three of the Guard]
 
BRANDON
            ,       ,          ,    ,
      Your of|fice ser|geant: ex|ecute it.
 
SERGEANT
                                            ,
                                           Sir,
           ,          ,         ,      ,          ,
      My lord | the Duke | of Buck|ingham,| and Earl
           ,          ,                ,   ,       ,
      Of Here|ford, Staf|ford, and / Northamp|ton, I
          ,                ,    ,        ,         ,
      Arrest | thee of / high treas|on, in | the name
                 ,   ,    2      ,
      Of our / most sov|ereign king.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                     ,            ,
                                    Lo you | my lord,
           ,         ,     2  ,        ,          ,      ->
      The net | has fal|len upon | me, I | shall pe||rish
       ,    2    ,          ,
      und|er device,| and prac|tice.
 
BRANDON
                                     x      ,
                                    I am | sorry,
          ,          ,          ,     ,        ,       2->
      To see | you tane | from lib|erty,| to look || on
           ,         ,          ,          ,          ,       2->
      The bus|iness pres|ent. 'tis | his high|ness' plea||sure
            ,       2      x
      You shall | to the Tower.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                ,          ,        ,
                               It will | help me | nothing
           ,           ,     ,        2        x      ,
      To plead | mine in|nocence;| for that dye is | on me
              ,         ,           T     T     .    T          x
      Which makes | my whi|test | part, black. The will | of heaven
           ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
      Be done | in this | and all | things: I | obey.
               ,  ,    2  ,        ,          ,
      O my / Lord A|bergaven|ny: fare | you well.
 
BRANDON
       ,               ,         ,     ,         ,
      Nay, he | must bear | you comp|any.| The king
            ,            ,                x      ,          ,
      Is pleased | you shall | to the / Tower, till | you know
       ,    2    ,          ,
      How he de|termines | further.
 
ABERGAVENNY
                                               ,    ,
                                    As the / duke said,
            ,          x          ,       2       ,       ,
      The will | of heaven | be done,| and the king's | pleasure
          ,      ,
      By me | obeyed.
 
BRANDON
                       ,          ,         ,
                     Here is | a war|rant from
            ,      2    ,      T   T  .  T       2     ,      ->
      The king,| to attach | Lord Montacute,| and the bo||dies
       ,         ,          ,         ,      2    ,
      Of | the duke's | confes|sor, John | de la Car,
           ,         ,          ,
      One^Gil|bert Peck,| his chan|cellor,/
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                             ,   ,
                                            So, so;
        ,               ,       2      ,         ,        ,
      These are | the limbs | of the plot:| no more | I hope.
 
BRANDON
          ,      2      ,    ,
      A monk | of the Char|treux.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                                       ,         ,
                                  O | Michael | Hopkins?
 
BRANDON
       ,
      He.
 
BUCKINGHAM
                  ,    2     ,          T    T    T     ,
         My | survey|or is false:| the ore-great car|dinal
              ,           ,         ,          ,         ,     o
      Hath showed | him gold;| my life | is spanned | alrea|dy:  (hex with prev)
      ,           ,             ,    ,      ,
      I am | the shad|ow of / poor Buck|ingham,
             ,      ,    2      ,         ,           ,
      Whose fi|gure ev|en this inst|ant cloud | puts^on,
          ,     2          ,    ,         ,           ,
      By dark|ening my / clear sun.| My lords | farewell.
 
[Exeunt]

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