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Henry V

Act I, Scene 2

The same. The Presence chamber.
 
[Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants]
 
KING HENRY V
        ,            ,          ,        ,       x
      Where is | my gra|cious Lord | of Can|terbury?
 
EXETER
            ,        ,
      Not here | in pre|sence.
 
KING HENRY V
                                ,       2       ,     ,
                              Send | for him, good | uncle.
 
WESTMORELAND
        ,          ,          2   ,     ,         ,
      Shall we | call in | the ambas|sador,| my liege?
 
KING HENRY V
           ,        ,        ,          ,        ,
      Not yet,| my cou|sin: we | would be | resolved,
          ,         ,          ,           ,           ,
      Before | we hear | him, of | some things | of weight,
             ,            ,          ,        ,          ,
      That task | our thoughts,| concer|ning us | and France.
 
[Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY]
 
CANTERBURY
       ,             ,        ,           ,         ,
      God and | his an|gels guard | your sa|cred throne,
            ,          ,          x
      And make | you long | become it.
 
KING HENRY V
                                        ,         ,
                                      Sure we | thank you.
           ,        ,         ,     ,            ,
      My lear|ned lord,| we pray | you to | proceed,
            ,      ,       ,       ,       ,
      And just|ly and | reli|giously | unfold,
                 ,   ,   ,                 ,          ,
      Why the / law Sa|lique that | they have | in France,
            ,           ,      ,   ,                  ,
      Or should | or should | not bar / us in | our claim:
           ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
      And God | forbid,| my dear | and faith|ful lord,
        ,     2           ,         ,          ,          ,
      That you should | fashion,| wrest, or | bow your | reading,
           ,        ,           ,      ,         ,
      Or nice|ly charge | your un|derstan|ding soul,
           ,   2     ,       ,      ,            ,
      With o|pening ti|tles mis|create,| whose right
             ,        ,       ,        ,          ,
      Suits^not | in na|tive co|lors with | the truth:
           ,           ,         ,     ,          ,
      For God | doth know,| how ma|ny now | in health,
              ,            ,         ,     ,
      Shall drop | their blood,| in ap|proba|tion
      <- ,      ,          ,           ,         ,        ,
        Of || what your | reve|rence shall | incite | us to.
             ,           ,     ,     2     ,         ,
      Therefore | take^heed | how you im|pawn our | person,
       ,           ,          ,         ,         ,
      How you | awake | our slee|ping sword | of war;
            ,          ,         ,        ,           ,
      We charge | you in | the name | of God | take^heed:
           ,      ,           ,        ,         ,
      For ne|ver two | such^king|doms did | contend,
           ,           ,         ,             ,          ,
      Without | much^fall | of blood,| whose^guilt|less drops
           ,      ,       ,        ,          ,
      Are ev|ery one | a woe,| a sore | complaint,
        2      ,            ,             ,       ,          ,
      against^him | whose^wrong | gives edge | unto | the swords
             ,           ,          ,         ,    ,
      That make | such^waste | in brief | morta|lity.
       ,            ,     ,         ,          ,
      Under | this con|jura|tion, speak | my lord:
           ,          ,      ,             ,          ,
      For we | will hear,| note, and | believe | in heart,
             ,          ,         ,         ,             ,
      That what | you speak | is in | your con|science washed,
           ,        ,          ,   ,    oo
      As pure | as sin | with bap|tism.|
 
CANTERBURY
             ,        ,         ,   2       ,          ,
      Then hear | me gra|cious so|vereign, and | you peers,
            ,           ,            ,          ,     ,
      That owe | yourselves,| your lives,| and ser|vices,
       ,           ,   2     ,            ,       ,
      To this | impe|rial throne.| There is | no bar
           ,        ,            ,          ,           ,
      To make | against | your high|ness' claim | to France,
            ,            ,         ,          ,      ,
      But this | which they | produce | from Pha|ramond,
                                      
      In terram Salicam mulieres ne succedant,  ????
          ,       ,          ,     .  T  T     T
      No wo|man shall | succeed | in Salique land:
             ,   T     T   .     T         ,       ,
      Which Sa|lique land the French | unjust|ly gloze
          ,         ,           ,          ,      ,
      To be | the realm | of France,| and Pha|ramond
            ,       ,         ,         ,       ,
      The foun|der of | this law | and fe|male bar.
       ,               ,         ,       ,       ,
      Yet their | own^au|thors faith|fully | affirm,
                   ,   ,   ,            ,     ,
      That the / land Sa|lique is | in Ger|many,
          ,            ,         ,     ,         x
      Between | the floods | of Sa|la and | of Elbe;
               ,            ,      ,    2      ,         ,
      Where Charles | the Great | having sub|dued the | Saxons,
              ,        ,         ,        ,          ,
      There left | behind | and set|tled cer|tain French:
       ,   ,         2      ,         ,        ,
      Who hol/ding in dis|dain the | German | women,
            ,        ,       ,        ,           ,
      For some | disho|nest man|ners of | their life,
         ,           ,          ,        ,        ,      2->
      Esta|blished then | this law;| to wit,| no fe||male
              ,      ,     ,     .  T  T     T
      Should be | inhe|ritrix | in Salique land:
             ,    ,     2      ,            ,  2       ,
      Which Sal|ique (as I | said) 'twixt^|Elbe and | Sala,
       ,   2        ,        ,           ,      ,
      Is at this | day in | Germa|ny, called | Meisen.
             ,         ,        ,     .   T  T    T
      Then doth | it well | appear,| the Salique law
           ,       ,      ,          ,           ,
      Was not | devi|sed for | the realm | of France:
       ,     2         ,         ,         T  T     T
      Nor did the | French pos|sess the | Salique land,
         ,           ,        ,          ,       ,
      Until | four* hun|dred one | and twen|ty years
       ,          ,              ,   ,      ,
      After | defunc|tion of / King Pha|ramond,
       ,  2      ,           ,        ,         ,
      Idly sup|posed the | founder | of this | law,
      <-         ,        ,         ,        ,       ,
        Who || died with|in the | year of | our re|demption
             ,         ,      ,           ,            ,
      Four* hun|dred twen|ty-six:| and Charles | the Great
           ,         ,        ,          ,           ,
      Subdued | the Sax|ons, and | did seat | the French
          ,         ,      ,      ,         ,
      Beyond | the ri|ver Sa|la, in | the year
             ,         ,        ,            ,        ,
      Eight^hun|dred five.| Besides,| their wri|ters say,
            ,        ,         ,       T  T T
      King Pe|pin, which | deposed | Childeric,
       ,         ,   ,          ,   2     ,
      Did as | heir gen/eral,| being de|scended
          ,           ,           ,      2     ,         ,
      Of Bli|thild, which | was daugh|ter to King | Clothair,
             ,          ,      ,         ,           ,
      Make^claim | and ti|tle to | the crown | of France.
            ,      ,      ,        ,           ,
      Hugh Ca|pet al|so, who | usurped | the crown
            ,            ,      2     ,       T    T    T
      Of Charles | the duke | of Lorraine,| sole heir male
                 ,    ,          ,           ,            ,
      Of the / true line | and stock | of Charles | the Great:
           ,         ,              ,    ,          ,
      To find | his ti|tle with / some shows | of truth,
         ,          T    T    T      2     ,           ,
      Though in | pure truth it | was corrupt | and naught,
           ,          ,         ,      2     ,   2     ,
      Conveyed | himself | as heir | to the La|dy Lingare,
        ,             ,      ,     ,             ,
      Daughter | to Char|lemain,| who was | the son
          ,    2     ,    ,         ,    2     ,
      To Le|wis the em|peror,| and Le|wis the son
            ,            ,      ,           ,    2      ,
      Of Charles | the Great:| also | King^Le|wis the Tenth,
         2      ,      ,   ,          ,        ,
      Who was sole | heir to / the u|surper | Capet,
        T    T    T     ,       ,        ,
      Could not keep | quiet | in his | conscience,
       ,              ,           ,           ,      ,
      Wearing | the crown | of France,| till sa|tisfied,
             ,          ,    ,          ,    ,
      That fair | Queen^I|sabel,| his grand|mother,
           ,   2   ,        ,     ,      ,
      Was li|neal of | the La|dy Er|mengare,
        ,     2        ,            T   T    T      2     ,
      Daughter to | Charles the | foresaid duke | of Lorraine:
        2      ,      ,               ,          ,            ,
      By the which | marriage,| the line | of Charles | the Great
           ,   ,      ,         ,           ,
      Was re|uni|ted to | the crown | of France.
       ,              ,         ,        ,         ,
      So, that | as clear | as is | the sum|mer's sun,
            ,        ,              ,   ,         ,
      King Pe|pin's ti|tle, and / Hugh Ca|pet's claim,
            ,    2     ,     ,         ,        ,
      King Le|wis his sa|tisfac|tion, all | appear
           ,         ,          ,       2       ,  ,
      To hold | in right | and ti|tle of the / female:
       ,            ,           ,      ,           ,
      So do | the kings | of France | unto | this day.
           x      ,       2       ,         T  T    T
      Howbeit,| they would hold^|up this | Salique law
          ,           ,         ,         ,         ,    ,  ->
      To bar | your high|ness clai|ming from | the fe||male,
             ,          ,          ,           2   ,
      And | rather | choose to | hide them | in a net,
            ,  ,    2    ,            ,        ,
      Than am|ply to im|bar their | crooked | titles,
          ,           ,          ,        ,     ,
      Usurped | from you | and your | proge|nitors.
 
KING HENRY V
       ,             ,          ,            ,           ,
      May I | with right | and con|science make | this claim?
 
CANTERBURY
           ,    . T   T   T      ,    ,
      The sin | upon my head,| dread so/vereign:
           ,         ,        ,        ,        ,
      For in | the book | of Num|bers is | it writ,
                  ,    ,     ,           ,     ,
      When the / man dies,| let the | inhe|ritance
          ,        ,         ,         ,          ,
      Descend | unto | the daugh|ter. Gra|cious lord,
        ,               ,        ,           ,       ,
      Stand for | your own,| unwind | your bloo|dy flag,
        T    T   T   2       ,      ,  ,
      Look back in|to your migh|ty an|cestors:
       T  .   T     T      2       ,      T    T      T
      Go my dread lord,| to your great-|grandsire's tomb,
             ,          ,         ,     .   T   T    Tx
      From whom | you claim;| invoke | his warlike spirit,
                   ,    ,         ,              ,      ,
      And your / great-un|cle's, Ed|ward the / Black Prince,
       ,    2         T      T      T        ,     ,
      Who on the | French ground played | a tra|gedy,
       ,           ,               ,    x           ,
      Making | defeat | on the / full power | of France:
         T    .    T    T      ,       ,       ,
      Whiles his most might|y fa|ther on | a hill
        ,    ,                 ,         ,        ,
      Stood smi/ling, to | behold | his li|on's whelp
       ,            ,           ,        ,    ,
      Forage | in blood | of French | nobi|lity.
         ,      ,          ,           ,      ,
      O no|ble Eng|lish, that | could en|tertain
             ,           ,               ,    ,           ,
      With half | their for|ces, the / full Pride | of France,
           ,      ,        ,     ___      ,          , ->
      And let | ano|ther half | stand | laughing || by,
       ,               ,           ,         ,
      All / out of | work, and | cold for | action.
 
ELY
         ,       ,          ,          ,   2     ,
      Awake | remem|brance of | these va|liant dead,
       ,                ,        ,       ,            ,
      And with | your puis|sant arm | renew | their feats;
       ,                ,         ,      ,             ,
      You are | their heir,| you sit | upon | their throne:
            ,          ,         ,       ,        ,
      The blood | and cou|rage that | renow|ned them,
        ,              ,                 ,     ,         ,
      Runs in | your veins:| and my / thrice-puis|sant liege
          ,        ,     ,     ,             ,
      Is in | the ve|ry May-|morn of | his youth,
        T   .   T   T           ,      ,     ,      2->
      Ripe for^exploits | and migh|ty en|terpri||ses.
 
EXETER
            ,         ,          ,    ,              ,
      Your bro|ther kings | and mo|narchs of | the earth
          ,        ,          ,             ,           ,
      Do all | expect,| that you | should rouse | yourself,
          ,         ,       ,      ,          ,
      As did | the for|mer li|ons of | your blood.
 
WESTMORELAND
             ,           ,            ,           ,           ,
      They know | your grace | hath cause,| and means,| and might;
       ,     2         ,         ,        ,        ,
      So hath your | highness:| never | king of | England
           ,        ,              ,   ,      ,   ___
      Had no|bles rich|er, and / more loy|al sub|jects,
               ,            ,           ,        ,        ,       o
      Whose hearts | have left | their bo|dies here | in Eng|land,  (hex with prev)
           ,       ,    x               ,           ,
      And lie | pavi|lioned in | the fields | of France.
 
CANTERBURY
         ,           ,       ,             ,    ,
      O let | their bo|dies fol|low my / dear liege
             ,            ,           x        ,           ,
      With bloods,| and sword,| and fire,| to win | your right:
          ,          ,    ,             x     ,    2->
      In aid | whereof,| we of | the spirit|ual||ty
             ,            ,         ,        ,      ,
      Will raise | your high|ness such | a migh|ty sum,
          ,      ,          ,           ,    ,
      As ne|ver did | the cler|gy at / one time
             ,      ,     ,         ,  ,
      Bring^in | to a|ny of | your an|cestors.
 
KING HENRY V
           ,         ,     ,      2    ,           ,
      We must | not on|ly arm | to invade | the French,
           ,          ,        ,         ,       ,
      But lay | down our | propor|tions to | defend
          ,           ,       2       ,      ,     ,
      Against | the Scot,| who will make | road u|pon us,
            ,       ,     ,    oo   oo
      With all | advan|tages.|    |
 
CANTERBURY
        T   T   T      ,         ,          ,  2
      They of those | marches,| gracious | sovereign,
             ,       ,        ,        ,      ,
      Shall be | a wall | suffi|cient to | defend
           ,        ,         ,    2     ,      ,
      Our in|land from | the pil|fering bor|derers.
 
KING HENRY V
       ,   2        ,          ,          ,          ,
      We do not | mean the | coursing | snatchers | only,
            ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      But fear | the main | intend|ment of | the Scot,
            ,           ,        ,       ,         x
      Who hath | been still | a gid|dy neigh|bor to us:
           ,            ,                ,     ,    ,
      For you | shall read,| that my / great-grand|father
       ,        ,              ,       ,       ,
      Never | went with | his for|ces in|to France,
       ,               ,      2     ,   ,           ,
      But that | the Scot,| on his un|furnished | kingdom,
             ,        ,          ,     ,          ,
      Came^pour|ing like | the tide | into | a breach,
            ,             ,    ,        ,         ,
      With am|ple and / brim full|ness of | his force,
       ,              ,        ,          ,     ,
      Galling | the glea|ned land | with hot | assays,
       ,               ,         ,      ,              ,
      Girding | with grie|vous siege,| castles | and towns:
            ,        ,      ,      ,       ,
      That Eng|land be|ing emp|ty of | defense,
             ,           ,        ,        ,      ,     2
      Hath shook | and trem|bled at | the ill | neighborhood*.
 
CANTERBURY
            ,           ,             ,             ,          ,
      She hath | been then | more* feared | than harmed,| my liege:
            ,         ,       ,       ,        ,
      For hear | her but | exam|pled by | herself,
            ,         ,      ,          ,          ,
      When all | her chi|valry | hath been | in France,
           ,        ,        ,  ,    2       ,
      And she | a mour|ning wi|dow of her | nobles,
       ,      2      ,         ,       ,      ,
      She hath her|self not | only | well de|fended,
           ,      ,        ,       ,       ,
      But ta|ken and | impoun|ded as | a stray,
            ,         ,       ,              ,          ,
      The King | of Scots:| whom she | did send | to France,
       .   T    T   T          ,          ,    2     ,
      To fill King Ed|ward's fame | with pri|soner kings,
            ,          ,     ,         ,            ,
      And make | her chro|nicle | as rich | with praise,
          ,         ,         ,       ,        ,
      As is | the ooze | and bot|tom of | the sea
            ,        ,          ,         ,      ,
      With sun|ken wreck,| and sun|less trea|suries.
 
WESTMORELAND
             ,         ,       ,     ,          ,
      But there's | a say|ing ve|ry old | and true,
       ,         ,           __     ___
      If that | you will | France | win,
        ,           ,          ,      ___
      Then with | Scotland | first be|gin.  (tetra with prev)
            ,         ,       ,         ,    2     ,
      For once | the ea|gle (Eng|land) be|ing in prey,
                ,  ,        ,         ,         ,
      To her / unguar|ded nest,| the wea|sel (Scot)
              ,               ,   ,            ,        ,
      Comes^snea|king, and / so sucks | her prince|ly eggs,
        ,             ,         ,        ,        ,
      Playing | the mouse | in ab|sence of | the cat,
           ,         ,       ,          ,         ,
      To tame | and ha|voc more | than she | can eat.
 
EXETER
          ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
      It fol|lows then,| the cat | must stay | at home,
            ,        ,         ,         ,     ,
      Yet that | is but | a crushed | neces|sity,
        ,     2         ,          T   T    T      x
      Since we have | locks to | safeguard ne|cessaries,
            ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      And pret|ty traps | to catch | the pet|ty thieves.
        ,               ,       ,           ,        ,
      While that | the arm|ed hand | doth fight | abroad,
         2   ,       ,        ,         ,         ,
      The advi|sed head | defends | itself | at home:
           ,       ,             ,         ,         ,     ->
      For go|vernment,| though high,| and low,| and lo||wer,
       ,          ,            ,        ,         ,
      Put in|to parts,| doth keep | in one | consent,
           ,       ,       ,         ,         ,
      Congree|ing in | a full | and na|tural close,
        ,   ,
      Like mu/sic.
 
CANTERBURY
                          ,          ,           ,
                  There|fore doth | heaven | divide
            ,         ,        ,        ,  
      The state | of man | in di|vers func|tions,
      <- ,         ,  ,        ,      ,  2     ,
        Set||ting en|deavor | in con|tinual | motion;
           ,         ,      ,       ,         ,
      To which | is fix|ed as | an aim | or butt,
        ,    2           ,   ,         ,       ,
      Obe|dience: for / so work | the ho|ney-bees,
        ,               ,       ,        ,        ,
      Creatures | that by | a rule | in na|ture teach
           ,        ,  ,    2     ,          ,
      The act | of or|der to a | peopled | kingdom.
        ,             ,         ,     ,         ,
      They have | a king,| and of|ficers | of sorts,
              ,          ,      ,           ,         ,
      Where some | like ma|gistrates | correct | at home:
      ,              ,          ,         ,        ,
      Others,| like^mer|chants ven|ture trade | abroad:
      ,              ,         ,      ,            ,
      Others,| like^sol|diers arm|ed in | their stings,
        T    T  . T         ,         ,        ,
      Make boot upon | the sum|mer's vel|vet buds:
             ,          ,           x       T     T     T
      Which^pil|lage, they | with merry | march bring home
                 ,   ,      ,          ,    ,
      To the / tent-roy|al of | their em|peror:
       ,   ,                ,     ,          ,
      Who bu/sied in | his ma|jesties | surveys
            ,       ,        ,         ,          ,
      The sing|ing ma|sons buil|ding roofs | of gold,
           ,      ,     ,      ,     3  3       ,
      The ci|vil ci|tizens | kneading up the | honey;
            ,       ,       ,         ,        ,
      The poor | mecha|nic por|ters crow|ding in
             ,      ,        ,        ,        ,
      Their hea|vy bur|dens at | his nar|row gate:
       .   T    T   T    ,               ,      ,
      The sad-eyed jus|tice, with | his sur|ly hum,
         ,           ,   ,     ,    2     ,
      Deli|vering / ore to | exec|utors pale
           ,     ,         ,         ,       ,
      The la|zy yaw|ning drone:| I this | infer,
            ,       ,      ,         ,   ,
      That ma|ny things | having | full re/ference
          ,         ,          ,        ,    2   ,
      To one | consent,| may work | contra|riously,
          ,     ,         ,      ,         ,
      As ma|ny ar|rows loosed | seve|ral ways
        T   .  T    T        ,      ,      T   .  T    T
      Come to one mark:| as ma|ny ways | meet in one town, ????
           x      T      T      T     .  T    T   T
      As many | fresh streams meet | in one salt sea;
          ,      ,       ,              x       ,
      As ma|ny lines | close in | the dial's | center:
       ,           ,        ,         ,       ,
      So may | a thou|sand ac|tions once | afoot,
       ,        ,   ,           2      T    T    T
      And in | one pur/pose, and be | all well borne
           ,        ,           ,          ,          ,
      Without | defeat.| Therefore | to France,| my liege.
          ,          ,      ,        ,      ,
      Divide | your hap|py Eng|land in|to four,
            ,     ,              ,       ,       ,
      Whereof,| take you | one^quar|ter in|to France,
           ,        ,            ,         ,   2    ,
      And you | withal | shall make | all^Gal|lia shake.
          ,           ,           ,        ,         ,
      If we | with thrice | such^pow|ers left | at home,
       ,           ,         ,      ,               ,
      Cannot | defend | our own | doors from | the dog,
       ,           ,         ,         ,        ,
      Let us | be wor|ried, and | our na|tion lose
            ,        ,      ,         ,    ,
      The name | of har|diness | and po|licy.
 
KING HENRY V
        ,    2       ,       ,    ,                ,
      Call in the | messen|gers sent / from the | Dauphin.
       ,     2       ,        ,           T   T     T
      Now are we | well re|solved, and | by God's help
            ,          ,      ,       ,         x
      And yours,| the no|ble sin|ews of | our power,
         ,            ,            ,        ,        ,
      France be|ing ours,| we'll bend | it to | our awe,
              x      ,        ,            ,            ,
      Or break it | all to | pieces.| Or there | we'll sit,
        ,            ,          ,      ,    ,
      (Ruling | in large | and am|ple em|pery,
             ,      ,     2       ,         ,        ,
      Ore France,| and all her |(almost)| kingly | dukedoms)
          ,            ,              , ,       ,
      Or lay | these bones | in an / unwor|thy urn,
        ,              ,      ,         ,       ,
      Tombless,| with no | remem|brance o|ver them:
       ,            ,    2    ,       T    T    T
      Either | our his|tory shall | with full mouth
        ,     ,                ,         ,          ,
      Speak free/ly of | our acts,| or else | our grave
             ,        ,            ,         ,          ,
      Like^Turk|ish mute,| shall have | a tongue|less mouth,
           ,            ,       ,      ,    ,
      Not wor|shipped with | a wax|en ep|itaph.
       ,     2       ,        ,          ,          ,
      Now are we | well pre|pared to | know the | pleasure
                 ,   ,       ,         ,         ,
      Of our / fair cou|sin Dau|phin: for | we hear,
             ,        ,         ,     ,               ,
      Your gree|ting is | from him,| not from | the king.
 
[Enter Ambassadors of France]
 
FIRST AMBASSADOR
         2      ,           ,    ,         ,         ,
      May it please | your ma|jesty | to give | us leave
        ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      Freely | to ren|der what | we have | in charge:
           ,         ,       ,     ,             ,
      Or shall | we spa|ringly | show you | far^off
           ,          ,         ,         ,     ,
      The Dau|phin's mea|ning, and | our em|bassy.
 
KING HENRY V
       ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      We are | no ty|rant, but | a Chris|tian king,
       ,  2         ,          ,         ,       ,
      Unto whose^|grace our | passion | is as | subject*
       T  T   T      ,         ,      3  3       ,
      As are our | wretches | fettered in our | prisons:
        ,                ,                 ,   ,       ,
      Therefore | with frank | and with / uncurbed | plainness
        ,            ,           ,
      Tell us | the Dau|phin's mind.
 
FIRST AMBASSADOR
                                      ,             ,
                                    Thus then | in few:
             ,         ,      ,        ,       ,
      Your high|ness late|ly sen|ding in|to France,
            ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      Did claim | some cer|tain duke|doms, in | the right
        2       ,      ,     ,             ,     2      ,
      Of your great | prede|cessor,| King^Ed|ward the Third.
          ,     2     ,       ,             ,          ,
      In an|swer of which | claim, the | prince our | master
        ,              ,      ,      ,              ,
      Says that | you sa|vor too | much of | your youth,
            ,         ,       ,                ,           ,
      And bids | you be | advised:| there's nought | in France,
            ,         ,       ,       ,    2    ,
      That can | be with | a nim|ble gal|liard won:
           ,       ,      ,      ,         ,
      You can|not re|vel in|to duke|doms there.
           ,          ,          ,       ,            x
      He there|fore sends | you mee|ter for | your spirit
            ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      This tun | of trea|sure; and | in lieu | of this,
          ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Desires | you let | the duke|doms that | you claim
        ,         ,              ,         ,          ,
      Hear no | more of | you. This | the Dau|phin speaks.
 
KING HENRY V
             ,        ,
      What trea|sure un|cle?
 
EXETER
                             ,        ,          ,
                            Ten|nis balls,| my liege.
 
KING HENRY V
        2      ,         ,      2    ,     ,              ,
      We are glad | the Dau|phin is so | pleasant | with us,
           ,                ,    ,          ,          ,
      His pre|sent, and / your pains | we thank | you for:
        ,               ,            ,             ,     ,
      When we | have marched | our rack|ets to / these balls,
           ,          ,          ,       T      T  .  T
      We will | in France |(by God's | grace, play a set
               ,          ,          ,      ,  2       ,
      Shall strike | his fa|ther's crown | into the | hazard.
        ,          2       ,        ,            ,        ,       2->
      Tell him,| he hath made | a match | with such | a wrang||ler
            ,           ,           ,           ,        ,
      That all | the courts | of France | will be | disturbed
            ,        ,        ,      ,           ,
      With cha|ces. And | we un|derstand | him well,
       ,         T    T   T       2     ,        ,
      How he | comes ore us | with our wil|der days,
           ,      ,          ,         ,         ,
      Not mea|suring | what use | we made | of them.
          ,      ,     2       ,      ,        ,
      We ne|ver val|ued this poor | seat of | England,
            ,         ,        ,           ,         ,
      And there|fore li|ving hence,| did give | ourself
          ,    2     ,         ,         x     ,
      To bar|barous li|cense: as |'tis ever | common,
            ,         ,    2      ,          ,           ,
      That men | are mer|riest, when | they are | from home.
            ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      But tell | the Dau|phin, I | will keep | my state,
           ,        ,          ,         ,         ,        ->
      Be like | a king,| and show | my sail | of great||ness,
        ,    ,        ,          2      ,           ,
      When | I do | rouse me | in my throne | of France.
            ,               ,   ,       ,    ,
      For that | I have / laid by | my ma|jesty
            ,        ,       ,         ,         ,
      And plod|ded like | a man | for wor|king-days:
          ,          ,      ,       2       ,       ,
      But I | will rise | there with so | full a | glory,
           ,         ,       ,          ,          ,
      That I | will daz|zle all | the eyes | of France,
              ,          ,         ,          ,        ,
      Yea* strike | the Dau|phin blind | to look | on us,
            ,          ,          ,            ,        ,
      And tell | the plea|sant prince | this mock | of his
              ,           ,         ,      ,                ,
      Hath turned | his balls | to gun-|stones, and | his soul
              ,       ,     ,                  ,         ,
      Shall stand | sore charged,/ for the | wasteful | vengeance
          2       ,           ,         ,   2    ,        ,      2->
      That shall fly | with them:| for ma|ny a thou|sand wi||dows
              ,          ,      ,     2             ,     ,
      Shall this | his mock,| mock out of | their dear | husbands;
        ,   ,                      ,          ,         ,
      Mock mo/thers from | their sons,| mock^cas|tles down:
            ,         ,       ,             ,  ,
      And some | are yet | ungot|ten and / unborn
             ,            ,          ,          ,           ,
      That shall | have cause | to curse | the Dau|phin's scorn.
            ,          ,        ,          ,        ,
      But this | lies^all | within | the will | of God,
           ,       ,       ,         ,           ,
      To whom | I do | appeal,| and in | whose^name
        T   T   .   T       ,       ,       ,
      Tell you the Dau|phin I | am co|ming on,
           ,         ,      ,              ,    ,
      To venge | me as | I may,| and to / put forth
           ,         ,      2    ,    ,           ,
      My right|ful hand | in a well-|hallowed | cause.
      <-       ,          ,          ,            ,         ,
        So || get you | hence in | peace: and | tell the | Dauphin,
            ,          ,      ,         ,       ,
      His jest | will sa|vor but | of shal|low wit,
             ,          ,      ,               ,         ,
      When thou|sands weep | more than | did laugh | at it.
          ,        2       ,     T   T     T          ,
      Convey | them with safe | conduct. Fare | you well.
 
[Exeunt Ambassadors]
 
EXETER
        ,           ,      ,       o   oo
      This was | a mer|ry mes|sage.  |
 
KING HENRY V
           ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      We hope | to make | the sen|der blush | at it:
        ,              ,       ,        ,       ,
      Therefore,| my lords,| omit | no hap|py hour,
            ,          ,     2      ,        ,    ,      ->
      That may | give^fur|therance to | our ex|pedi||tion:
       ,      2      ,          ,          ,          ,
      For | we have now | no thought | in us | but France,
        T    T    .  T          ,        ,         ,        ->
      Save those to God,| that run | before | our bus||iness.
        ,         ,       2    ,         ,            ,
      There|fore let | our propor|tions for | these wars
           ,        ,        ,     T     T      T         , ->
      Be soon | collec|ted, and | all things thought || upon,
            ,          ,    3 3     ,         ,
      That may | with rea|sonable swift|ness add
             ,         ,         ,          ,        ,
      More* fea|thers to | our wings:| for God | before,
              ,           ,        ,        ,          ,
      We'll chide | this Dau|phin at | his fa|ther's door.
             ,         ,      ,          ,           ,
      Therefore | let ev|ery man | now task | his thought,
             ,          ,       ,         ,          ,
      That this | fair^ac|tion may | on foot | be brought.
 
[Exeunt. Flourish]

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