Prescanned Shakespeare.com
presented by Acoustic Learning


Henry VI part two

Act III, Scene 2

Bury St. Edmund's. A room of state.
 
[Enter certain Murderers, hastily]
 
FIRST MURDERER
       ,            ,        ,         ,          ,
      Run to | my Lord | of Suf|folk: let | him know
       ,              ,            ,     ,   2     ,
      We have | dispatched | the duke,| as he com|manded.
 
SECOND MURDERER
       ,              ,        ,     ,              ,
      Oh, that | it were | to do:| What have | we done?
            ,       ,       ,        ,     ,
      Didst e|ver hear | a man | so pe|nitent?
 
[Enter SUFFOLK]
 
FIRST MURDERER
             ,          ,
      Here comes | my lord.  (pickup)
 
SUFFOLK
       T    T     T     ,         ,            ___
      Now sirs, have | you dis|patched this | thing?
 
FIRST MURDERER
       ,               ,           ,
      Aye, my | good lord,| he's dead.  (picked up)
 
SUFFOLK
             ,            ,     T   T   T      2     ,
      Why that's | well said.| Go, get you | to my house;
      ,            ,         ,          ,    2      ,
      I will | reward | you for | this ven|turous deed.
            ,         ,          ,           ,         ,
      The king | and all | the peers | are here | at hand.
                   ,    ,         ,        ,             ,
      Have you / laid fair | the bed?| Is all | things^well,
         ,        ,       ,       ,         o
      Accor|ding as | I gave | direc|tions?
 
FIRST MURDERER
        ,                ,
      'Tis, my | good* lord.
 
SUFFOLK
         ,        ,
      Away,| be gone.   (di with prev)
 
[Exeunt Murderers. Sound trumpets. Enter KING HENRY VI, QUEEN MARGARET, CARDINAL, SOMERSET, with Attendants]
 
KING HENRY VI
           ,         ,      ,        ,            ,
      Go call | our un|cle to | our pre|sence straight:
       ,            ,        ,          ,        ,
      Say, we | intend | to try | his grace | today,
       ,           ,       ,         ,      ,
      If he | be guil|ty, as | 'tis pub|lished.
 
SUFFOLK
             ,         ,       ,       ,       ,
      I'll call | him pre|sently,| my no|ble lord.
 
[Exit]
 
KING HENRY VI
              ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      Lords^take | your pla|ces: and | I pray | you all
           ,     T    T   .    ,           ,         ,
      Proceed | no straiter gainst our | uncle | Gloucester,  ????
                    ,   ,    ,          ,       ,
      Than from / true ev|idence | of good | esteem
          ,        ,          ,        ,     ,
      He be | approved | in prac|tise cul|pable.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
       ,       ,        ,         ,          ,
      God for|bid a|ny ma|lice should | prevail,
             ,         ,         ,       ,      ,
      That fault|less may | condemn | a no|ble man:
             ,        ,        ,     ,    2    ,
      Pray* God | he may | acquit | him of su|spicion.
 
KING HENRY VI
          ,           ,            ,          ,         ,
      I thank | thee Meg,| these words | content | me much.
 
[Re-enter SUFFOLK]
           ,           ,            ,          ,          ,
      How now?| Why lookst | thou pale?| Why trem|blest thou?
        ,             ,         ,          ,          x
      Where is | our un|cle? What's | the mat|ter, Suffolk?
 
SUFFOLK
        ,            ,         ,       ,              ,
      Dead in | his bed,| my lord:| Gloucester | is dead.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
       ,       ,        ,
      Marry | God for|fend.  ????
 
CARDINAL
             ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      God's^sec|ret judg|ment: I | did dream | tonight
            ,          ,          ,           ,         ,
      The duke | was dumb | and could | not speak | a word.
 
[KING HENRY VI swoons]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
            ,          ,      T    T     .    T         ,
      How fares | my lord?| Help lords, the king | is dead.
 
SOMERSET
        ,            ,       ,          ,         ,
      Rear up | his bo|dy; wring | him by | the nose.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
       T    T    T      ,       ,      ,          ,
      Run, go, help,| help: Oh Henry, ope thine eyes.  ????
 
SUFFOLK
           ,        ,       ,     ,   2      ,
      He doth | revive | again,| madam be | patient.
 
KING HENRY VI
           x       ,
      O heaven|ly God.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
                            ,         ,          ,
                      How fares | my gra|cious lord?
 
SUFFOLK
       ,            ,   2       ,         ,      ,       ->
      Comfort | my so|vereign, gra|cious Hen|ry com||fort.
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,        2     ,        ,        ,        , 
      What,| doth my Lord | of Suf|folk com|fort me?
        ,              ,         ,       ,         ,
      Came he | right^now | to sing | a ra|ven's note,
             ,        ,        ,        ,        x
      Whose dis|mal tune | bereft | my vi|tal powers;
             ,      ,              ,        ,       ,
      And thinks | he that | the chir|ping of | a wren,
          ,       ,         ,       ,         ,
      By cry|ing com|fort from | a hol|low breast,
            ,       ,          ,        ,        ,
      Can chase | away | the first-|concei|ved sound?
        ,             ,        ,          ,         ,
      Hide not | thy poi|son with | such su|gared words;
       ,              ,         ,        ,       ,
      Lay not | thy hands | on me:| forbear | I say,
              ,          ,          ,      ,           ,
      Their touch | affrights | me as | a ser|pent's sting.
             ,       ,      ,     ,            ,
      Thou bale|ful mes|senger,| out of | my sight:
        T   .   T    T      ,          ,     ,
      Upon thy eye-balls,| murde|rous ty|ranny
        T   .   T   T     ,         ,           ,
      Sits in grim ma|jesty,| to fright | the world.
        ,     2   ,        ,           ,          ,
      Look not u|pon me,| for thine^|eyes are | wounding:
           ,        ,     ,          ,     ,
      Yet do | not go | away:| come^ba|silisk,
            ,         ,   2     ,       ,          ,
      And kill | the in|nocent ga|zer with | thy sight;
       ,             ,          ,         ,           ,
      For in | the shade | of death | I shall | find^joy;
           ,         ,        ,            ,            ,
      In life,| but dou|ble death,| now Glouce|ster's dead.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
       ,             ,         ,        ,         ,
      Why do | you rate | my Lord | of Suf|folk thus?
           ,           ,        ,    ,       ,
      Although | the duke | was e|nemy | to him,
           ,          ,          ,        ,           ,
      Yet he | most Chris|tian-like | laments | his death:
           ,        ,     ,           ,        ,
      And for | myself,| foe as | he was | to me,
             ,        ,          ,       ,          ,
      Might^li|quid tears | or heart-|offen|ding groans
           ,        ,        ,         ,          ,
      Or blood-|consu|ming sighs | recall | his life;
      ,              ,           ,          ,            ,
      I would | be blind | with wee|ping, sick | with groans,
        T    T   .   T    ,           T      Tx      T
      Look pale as prim|rose with | blood-drinking sighs,
           ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      And all | to have | the no|ble duke | alive.
        ,         ,             ,           ,        ,
      What know | I how | the world | may deem | of me?
       ,            ,          ,         ,         ,
      For it | is known | we were | but hol|low friends:
          ,          ,         ,          ,      ,
      It may | be judged | I made | the duke | away.
       ,      2       ,           ,            ,          ,
      So shall my | name with | slander's | tongue be | wounded,
            ,          ,           ,           ,        ,
      And prin|ces' courts | be filled | with my | reproach.
        ,        ,   2        ,           ,     ,
      This get | I by his | death: aye*| me un|happy,
          ,       ,            ,            ,    ,
      To be | a queen,| and crowned | with in|famy.
 
KING HENRY VI
          ,        ,          ,           ,        ,
      Ah woe | is me | for Glouce|ster, wret|ched man.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
          ,         ,          ,               ,  ,
      Be woe | for me,| more^wret|ched than / he is.
        ,                 ,      ,          ,          ,
      What, dost | thou turn | away | and hide | thy face?
      ,           ,         ,        ,        ,
      I am | no loath|some le|per, look | on me.
        ,           T     T       ,       ,       ,
      What? Art | thou, like the^ad|der, wax|en deaf?
          ,    2     ,          ,              ,    ,
      Be poi|sonous too,| and kill | thy for/lorn queen.
          ,         ,         ,          ,            ,
      Is all | thy com|fort shut | in Glouce|ster's tomb?
       ,               ,     ,          ,         ,
      Why then | dame^Mar|garet | was nere | thy joy.
         ,         ,        ,     ,        __
      Erect | his sta|tue, and | worship | it,
            ,     ,  ,        2      T   T     T
      And make | my im/age but an | alehouse sign.
          ,         ,             ,        ,         ,
      Was I | for this | nigh* wrecked | upon | the sea
            ,         ,         ,          ,           ,
      And twice | by awk|ward wind | from Eng|land's bank
              ,       ,       ,       ,        ,
      Drove^back | again | unto | my na|tive clime.
            ,       ,          ,         ,         ,
      What bo|ded this?| But well | forewar|ning wind
            ,        ,          ,        ,    2      ,
      Did seem | to say,| Seek^not | a scor|pion's nest,
           ,        ,      2     ,     T  T    T
      Nor set | no foo|ting on this | unkind shore?
            ,        ,           ,          ,        ,
      What did | I then?| But cursed | the gen|tle gusts,
           ,           ,            ,            ,        ,
      And he | that loosed | them forth | their bra|zen caves,
           ,           ,             ,           ,        ,
      And bid | them blow | towards^Eng|land's bles|sed shore,
           ,          ,       ,        ,         ,
      Or turn | our stern | upon | a dread|ful rock:
           ,        ,          ,      ,     ,
      Yet AEo|lus would | not be | a mur|derer,
            ,           ,       ,       ,      ,
      But left | that hate|ful of|fice un|to thee.
            ,       ,        ,        ,          ,        ->
      The pret|ty-vaul|ting sea | refused | to drown || me,
        ,     2       ,              ,          ,           ,
      Know|ing that thou | wouldst^have | me drowned | on shore
             ,          ,        ,       ,       2     ,
      With tears | as salt | as sea,| through thy un|kindness.
            ,          ,      ,          2     ,         ,
      The split|ting rocks | cowered | in the sin|king sands
            ,           ,         ,           ,        ,
      And would | not dash | me with | their rag|ged sides,
          ,           ,       ,            ,           ,
      Because | thy flin|ty heart,| more hard | than they,
        ,             ,       ,       ,     ,
      Might in | thy pa|lace pe|rish Mar|garet.
          ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      As far | as I | could ken | thy chal|ky cliffs,
        ,               ,          ,         ,         ,
      When from | thy shore | the tem|pest beat | us back,
          ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      I stood | upon | the hat|ches in | the storm,
            ,         ,      ,       ,        ,
      And when | the dus|ky sky,| began | to rob
          ,        ,        ,         ,             ,
      My ear|nest-ga|ping sight | of thy | land's^view,
          ,        ,      ,       ,         ,
      I took | a cost|ly jew|el from | my neck,
          ,      .  T    T    T         ,    ,
      A heart | it was bound in | with di|amonds,
            ,           ,            ,         ,            x
      And threw | it towards | thy land:| the sea | received it,
           ,        ,          ,      ,          ,
      And so | I wished | thy bo|dy might | my heart:
          ,    2       ,        ,          ,           ,
      And e|ven with this,| I lost | fair^En|gland's view
           ,           ,         ,        ,         ,
      And bid | mine^eyes | be pack|ing with | my heart,
             ,            ,          ,       ,      ,
      And called | them blind | and dus|ky spec|tacles,
           ,       ,        ,          ,       ,
      For lo|sing ken | of Al|bion's wish|ed coast.
           ,       ,        ,       ,            ,
      How of|ten have | I temp|ted Suf|folk's tongue
           ,       ,         ,       ,       ,
      (The a|gent of | thy foul | incon|stancy)
          ,          ,         ,      ,   2   ,
      To sit | and watch | me as | Ascan|ius did
            ,       ,        ,      ,         ,
      When he | to mad|ding Di|do would | unfold
           ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      His fa|ther's acts,| commenced | in bur|ning Troy.
         ,          ,            ,
      Am I | not witched | like her?
           ,          ,           ,
      Or thou | not false | like him?  (tri with prev)
            ,      ,         ,     ,   ,
      Aye* me,| I can | no more:| die Mar/garet,
           ,       ,            ,           ,         ,
      For Hen|ry weeps | that thou | dost live | so long.
 
[Noise within. Enter WARWICK, SALISBURY, and many Commons]
 
WARWICK
       ,   2    ,         ,       ,   2
      It is re|ported,| mighty | sovereign,
      <-       ,            ,         ,    2   ,      ,        2->
        That good || Duke^Humph|rey trai|torously is mur||dered
          ,         ,         ,    2     ,           ,
      By Suf|folk, and | the Car|dinal Beau|fort's means.
           ,         ,        ,       ,         ,
      The com|mons like | an an|gry hive | of bees
             ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      That want | their lea|der, scat|ter up | and down,
            ,         ,           ,         ,        ,
      And care | not who | they sting | in his | revenge.
          ,            ,              ,        ,    ,
      Myself | have calmed | their spleen|ful mu|tiny,
         ,           ,         ,      ,         ,
      Until | they hear | the or|der of | his death.
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,    2       ,          ,          T   T    T
      That he is | dead good*| Warwick,| 'tis too true,
           ,         ,     T    T     T     ,
      But how | he died | God knows, not | Henry:
       ,            ,         ,           ,           ,
      Enter | his cham|ber, view | his breath|less corpse,
           ,         ,      ,         ,        ,
      And com|ment then | upon | his sud|den death.
 
WARWICK
        ,             ,        ,       ,   ,    3 3
      That shall | I do | my liege;| Stay Sal/isbury,
                   ,   ,      ,         ,       ,
      With the / rude mul|titude,| till I | return.
 
[Exit]
 
KING HENRY VI
          ,            ,      T     T      T           ,
      O Thou | that judgst | all things, stay | my thoughts,
             ,            ,      ,        ,          ,
      My thoughts,| that la|bor to | persuade | my soul,
            ,  2      ,            ,         ,           ,
      Some vi|olent hands | were laid | on Humph|rey's life:
          ,       ,          ,          ,        ,
      If my | suspect | be false,| forgive | me God,
            ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      For judg|ment on|ly doth | belong | to thee:
        ,             ,        ,          ,      ,
      Fain would | I go | to chafe | his pa|ly lips,
             ,       ,        ,        ,         ,
      With twen|ty thou|sand kis|ses, and | to drain
        ,          ,       ,             ,    ,
      Upon | his face | an o|cean of / salt tears,
           ,         ,     ,  2        T    T    T
      To tell | my love | unto his | dumb deaf trunk,
       ,      2      ,          ,          ,      ,
      And with my | fingers | feel his | hand un|feeling:
           ,         ,          ,           ,     ,
      But all | in vain | are these | mean^ob|sequies,
       ,        ,    2        ,          ,       ,
      And to | survey his | dead and | earthly | image:
               x      ,         ,        ,         ,
      What were it | but to | make my | sorrow | greater?
 
[Re-enter WARWICK and others, bearing GLOUCESTER'S body on a bed]
 
WARWICK
            ,       ,         ,   2        ,          ,     ->
      Come^hi|ther gra|cious so|vereign, view | this bo||dy.
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,      2    ,          ,         ,          ,
      That | is to see | how deep | my grave | is made;
            ,          ,          ,         ,         x
      For with | his soul | fled^all | my world|ly solace,
           ,       ,       ,         ,         ,
      For see|ing him | I see | my life | in death.
 
WARWICK
           ,      ,        ,        ,          ,
      As sure|ly as | my soul | intends | to live
          2       ,       ,           ,          ,      ,
      With that dread | King that | took our | state u|pon him,
           ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      To free | us from | his fa|ther's wrath|ful curse,
         ,       ,           ,  2      ,            ,
      I do | believe | that vi|olent hands | were laid
        ,          ,                 ,    ,       ,
      Upon | the life | of this / thrice-fa|med duke.
 
SUFFOLK
          ,         ,      ,             ,         ,
      A dread|ful oath,| sworn with | a so|lemn tongue.
            ,          ,           ,        ,         ,
      What in|stance^gives | Lord^War|wick for | his vow?
 
WARWICK
       ,              ,         ,        ,         ,
      See how | the blood | is set|tled in | his face.
       ,             ,        ,      ,        ,
      Oft have | I seen | a time|ly-par|ted ghost,
          ,     ,           ,         ,          ,        ->
      Of ash|y sem|blance, mea|ger, pale,| and blood||less,
        x      ,       ,         2     ,   2      ,
      Being | all de|scended | to the la|boring heart;
       ,            ,    ,               ,            ,
      Who in | the con|flict that | it holds | with death,
           ,           ,         ,      2    ,         ,    ,
      Attracts | the same | for ai|dance against | the e|nemy;
        ,     ,   .    T       T     T     .    T       ,       o
      Which with the heart | there cools, and nere | retur|neth,  (hex with prev)
           ,           ,     ,         ,        ,
      To blush | and beau|tify | the cheek | again.
           ,          ,         ,           ,         ,
      But see,| his face | is black,| and full | of blood:
           ,     T      T  .  T           ,         ,
      His eye-|balls further^out | than when | he lived,
       ,          ,    ,                 ,         ,
      Staring | full ghast/ly, like^|a stran|gled man;
            ,         ,          ,            ,               ,     ,
      His hair | upreared,| his nos|trils stretched | with strug||gling;  ????
            ,        ,           ,         ,            ,
      His hands | abroad | displayed,| as one | that grasped
             ,           ,         ,           ,           ,
      And tugged | for life | and was | by strength | subdued:
        ,    2         ,           ,         ,          ,
      Look on the | sheets his | hair you | see, is | sticking;
            ,       ,           ,            ,          ,       ->
      His well-|propor|tioned beard | made rough | and rug||ged,
        ,      2     ,          ,        ,          ,
      Like | to the sum|mer's corn | by tem|pest lodged.
          ,       ,        ,        ,          ,
      It can|not be | but he | was mur|dered here;
            ,         ,            ,           ,     ,
      The least | of all | these signs | were pro|bable.
 
SUFFOLK
           ,         ,            ,         ,         ,
      Why War|wick, who | should do | the duke | to death?
          ,          ,        ,         ,       ,       2->
      Myself | and Beau|fort had | him in | protec||tion,
           ,       ,          ,        ,      ,
      And we | I hope | sir, are | no mur|derers.
 
WARWICK
            ,        ,           ,            ,           ,
      But both | of you | were vowed | Duke^Humph|rey's foes,
           ,         ,                 ,    ,         ,
      And you |(forsooth)| had the / good duke | to keep:
             ,          ,           ,           ,         ,
      'Tis like | you would | not feast | him like | a friend,
            ,           ,        ,        ,    ,
      And 'tis | well seen, he found | an e|nemy.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
            ,        ,        ,            ,     ,
      Then you | belike | suspect | these no|blemen,
           ,            ,    ,           ,         ,
      As guil|ty of / Duke Humph|rey's time|less death.
 
WARWICK
            ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      Who finds | the hei|fer dead,| and blee|ding fresh,
            ,          ,      ,         ,        ,
      And sees | fast^by,| a but|cher with | an axe,
       ,      2      ,            ,          ,           ,
      But will sus|pect, 'twas | he that | made the | slaughter?
            ,          ,    ,              ,           ,
      Who finds | the par|tridge in | the put|tock's nest,
           ,      ,       ,          ,          ,
      But may | ima|gine how | the bird | was dead,
           ,           ,      ,             ,         ,
      Although | the kite | soar with | unbloo|died beak?
            ,       ,              ,   ,     ,
      Eene so | suspi|cious is / this tra|gedy.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
           ,         ,         ,           ,             ,
      Are you | the but|cher, Suf|folk? Where's | your knife?
           ,          ,         ,      ,      2       ,
      Is Beau|fort termed | a kite?| Where are his | talons?
 
SUFFOLK
          ,         ,          ,          ,        ,
      I wear | no knife | to slaugh|ter slee|ping men,
             ,         ,         ,      ,              ,
      But here's | a venge|ful sword,| rusted | with ease,
             ,          ,       ,        ,    2      ,
      That shall | be scou|red in | his ran|corous heart
             ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      That slan|ders me | with mur|der's crim|son badge.
       ,     2         T      T     T        ,         ,
      Say, if thou | darst, proud Lord | of War|wick-shire,
           ,        ,            ,    ,           ,
      That I | am faul|ty in / Duke Humph|rey's death.
 
[Exeunt CARDINAL, SOMERSET, and others]
 
WARWICK
             ,          ,               ,      x        ,
      What dares | not War|wick, if / false Suffolk | dare him?
 
QUEEN MARGARET
           ,           ,         ,     ,   2      x
      He dares | not calm | his con|tume|lious spirit
            ,         ,       ,     ,         ,      2->
      Nor cease | to be | an ar|rogant | control||ler,
              ,         ,          ,       ,         ,
      Though Suf|folk dare | him twen|ty thou|sand times.
 
WARWICK
       ,           ,           ,   2      ,       ,
      Madam | be still:| with re|verence may | I say,
          ,        ,          ,         ,        ,
      For e|very word | you speak | in his | behalf,
           ,       ,         ,      ,     ,
      Is slan|der to | your roy|al dig|nity.
 
SUFFOLK
        T     Tx     T       ,      ,      ,      ->
      Blunt-witted lord,| igno|ble in | demea||nor,
       ,    2    ,       ,            ,         ,
      If | ever la|dy wronged | her lord | so much,
           ,        ,       ,         ,        ,
      Thy mo|ther took | into | her blame|ful bed
              ,        ,         ,          ,       ,
      Some* stern | untu|tored churl,| and no|ble stock
            ,       .    T    T    T            ,           ,
      Was graft | with crab-tree slip;| whose^fruit | thou art,
           ,      ,        ,        ,       ,
      And ne|ver of | the Ne|vils' no|ble race.
 
WARWICK
       ,               ,         ,        ,         ,
      But that | the guilt | of mur|der buck|lers thee
          ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      And I | should rob | the deaths|man of | his fee,
       ,                ,            ,    ,          ,
      Quitting | thee there|by of / ten thou|sand shames,
       ,             ,   2        ,          ,          ,
      And that | my so|vereign's pre|sence makes | me mild,
      .   T      T    T    2     ,        ,         ,
      I would, false mur|derous cow|ard, on | thy knee
        ,          ,   ,                 ,         ,
      Make thee | beg par/don for | thy pas|sed speech,
           ,              ,   ,        ,            ,
      And say | it was / thy mo|ther that | thou meantst
             ,         ,          ,        ,      ,
      That thou | thyself | was born | in bas|tardy;
           ,      ,           ,       ,        ,
      And af|ter all | this fear|ful ho|mage done,
        ,               ,          ,          ,         ,
      Give thee | thy hire,| and send | thy soul | to hell,
          ,         ,     ,            ,        ,
      Perni|cious blood-|sucker | of slee|ping men.
 
SUFFOLK
        ,              ,         ,         ,          ,
      Thou shall | be wa|king, while | I shed | thy blood,
           ,          ,          ,           ,         ,
      If from | this pre|sence thou | darst go | with me.
 
WARWICK
        ,      2   ,       ,          ,           ,
      Away | even^now,| or I | will drag | thee hence:
         ,         ,           ,           ,           ,
      Unwor|thy though | thou art,| I'll cope | with thee
           ,         ,              ,    ,           ,
      And do | some ser|vice to / Duke Humph|rey's ghost.
 
[Exeunt SUFFOLK and WARWICK]
 
KING HENRY VI
             ,          ,     ,       2      ,        ,
      What stron|ger breast|plate than a | heart un|tainted?
        ,              ,            ,          ,        ,
      Thrice is | he armed,| that hath | his quar|rel just;
           ,        ,         ,             ,        ,
      And he | but na|ked, though | locked^up | in steel,
             ,            ,       ,    ,    2     ,
      Whose^con|science with | injus|tice is cor|rupted.
 
[A noise within]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
             ,          ,
      What noise | is this?   \\
 
[Re-enter SUFFOLK and WARWICK, with their weapons drawn]
 
KING HENRY VI
           ,          ,
      Why how | now lords?
                                 ,        ,         ,
                          Your wrath|ful wea|pons drawn
        ,            ,           ,         ,        ,
      Here in | our pre|sence? Dare | you be | so bold?
            ,       ,   2     ,        ,         ,
      Why what | tumu|ltuous cla|mor have | we here?
 
SUFFOLK
            ,    2     ,          ,         ,        ,    2->
      The trai|torous War|wick, with | the men | of Bu||ry,
           ,      ,          ,      ,     ,
      Set all | upon | me, migh|ty so|vereign.
 
SALISBURY
        T    T   .  T          ,            ,           ,
      Sirs stand apart,| the king | shall know | your mind.
        T     T    .   T         ,          ,        ,
      Dread lord, the com|mons send | you word | by me,
          ,      T     Tx       T           ,         ,
      Unless | Lord Suffolk straight | be done | to death,
          ,          ,     ,           ,     ,
      Or ban|ished fair | England's | terri|tories,
             ,        ,   2      ,          ,          ,      2->
      They will | by vi|olence tear | him from | your pa||lace
           ,        ,           ,        ,           ,
      And tor|ture him | with grie|vous lin|gering death.
            ,        ,          ,           ,         ,
      They say,| by him | the good | Duke^Humph|rey died:
            ,        ,           ,           ,          ,
      They say,| in him | they fear | your high|ness' death;
            ,     T   T    .   T         ,     ,
      And mere | instinct of love | and loy|alty,
        ,             ,        ,     ,        ,
      Free from | a stub|born op|posite | intent,
       ,   2        ,          ,       ,          ,
      As being | thought to | contra|dict your | liking,
        ,            ,   ,                 ,       ,
      Makes them | thus for/ward in | his ba|nishment.
            ,         ,      2       ,     ,       ,
      They say,| in care | of your most | royal | person,
            ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      That if | your high|ness should | intend | to sleep,
             ,           ,    ,               ,            ,
      And charge,| that no | man should | disturb | your rest,
           ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      In pain | of your | dislike,| or pain | of death;
           ,        ,         ,         ,     ,
      Yet not|withstan|ding such | a strait | edict,
        ,             ,         ,           ,        ,
      Were there | a ser|pent seen,| with fork|ed tongue,
            ,      ,         ,            ,    ,
      That sly|ly gli|ded towards | your ma|jesty,
           ,         ,     ,     ,           ,
      It were | but ne|cessa|ry you | were waked,
        ,    2      ,          ,          ,         ,
      Lest being | suffered | in that | harmful | slumber,
           ,        ,            ,          ,       ,      ->
      The mor|tal worm | might make | the sleep | eter||nal;
       ,      ,           2      ,            ,        ,
      And | therefore | do they cry,| though you | forbid,
             ,           ,            ,           ,        ,
      That they | will guard | you, where | you will,| or no,
             ,      ,   ,               T      Tx    T
      From such | fell ser/pents as | false Suffolk is,
             ,        ,  ___         ,       ,
      With whose | enve|nomed | and fa|tal sting,
            ,       ,        ,       ,           ,
      Your lo|ving un|cle, twen|ty times | his worth,
            ,         ,       ,       ,         ,
      They say | is shame|fully | bereft | of life.
 
Commons [Within]
An answer from the king, my Lord of Salisbury.
 
SUFFOLK
             ,         ,          ,       ,          ,
      'Tis like | the com|mons, rude | unpo|lished hinds,
              ,          ,        ,          ,     ,
      Could send | such mes|sage to | their so|vereign:
           ,         ,           ,        ,        ,
      But you,| my lord,| were glad | to be | employed,
           ,           ,        ,    ,         ,
      To show | how quaint | an o|rator | you are.
           ,         ,      ,      x          ,
      But all | the ho|nor Sa|lisbury | hath won
       ,          ,             ,       ,     ,
      Is, that | he was | the lord | ambas|sador
        ,             ,         ,       ,         ,
      Sent from | a sort | of tink|ers to | the king.
 
Commons [Within]
An answer from the king, or we will all break in.
 
KING HENRY VI
          ,      x          ,          ,          ,
      Go Sa|lisbury,| and tell | them all | from me,
          ,           ,           ,       ,        ,
      I thank | them for | their ten|der lo|ving care;
           ,       ,          ,      ,        ,
      And had | I not | been ci|ted so | by them,
           ,       ,        ,         ,       ,
      Yet did | I pur|pose as | they do | entreat:
            ,           ,           ,      ,      ,
      For sure,| my thoughts | do hour|ly pro|phesy,
            ,        ,        ,         ,           ,
      Mischance | unto | my state | by Suf|folk's means.
            ,         ,        ,     ,       ,
      And there|fore by | His ma|jesty | I swear,
             ,       ,       ,    ,      ,
      Whose far | unwor|thy dep|uty | I am,
           ,            ,         ,        ,         ,
      He shall | not breathe | infec|tion in | this air
            ,       ,   ,                  ,         ,
      But three | days lon/ger, on | the pain | of death.
 
[Exit SALISBURY]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
          ,       ,         ,          ,         x
      Oh Hen|ry, let | me plead | for gen|tle Suffolk.
 
KING HENRY VI
         ,        ,          ,         ,         x
      Ungen|tle queen,| to call | him gen|tle Suffolk.
           ,       ,         ,           ,          ,
      No more | I say:| if thou | dost plead | for him,
             ,         ,         ,        ,        ,
      Thou wilt | but add | increase | unto | my wrath.
          ,         ,        ,            ,         ,
      Had I | but said,| I would | have kept | my word;
            ,        ,         ,      ,      ,
      But when | I swear,| it is | irrev|ocable.
          ,        ,            ,            ,            ,
      If af|ter three | days'^space | thou here | beest^found,
         ,       ,          ,       ,      ,
      On a|ny ground | that I | am ru|ler of,
            ,            ,        ,       ,          ,
      The world | shall not | be ran|som for | thy life.
           ,          ,           ,         ,         ,
      Com^War|wick, come | good* War|wick, go | with me,
          ,      ,    ,                ,         ,
      I have | great mat/ters to | impart | to thee.
 
[Exeunt all but QUEEN MARGARET and SUFFOLK]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
           ,           ,       ,      ,          ,
      Mischance | and sor|row go | along | with you,
         T     T  T    ,           ,       ,
      Heart's discon|tent, and | sour af|fliction
           ,   ,             ,         ,     ,
      Be play|fellows | to keep | you com|pany:
               ,        ,         ,       ,        ,
      There's two | of you,| the de|vil make | a third,
       .    T    T   T           ,      ,           ,
      And threefold ven|geance tend | upon | your steps.
 
SUFFOLK
       ___     ,         ,            ,   ,
      Cease,| gentle | queen, these^|exe|crations,
           ,         ,         ,         ,       ,
      And let | thy Suf|folk take | his hea|vy leave.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
      ___    ,        ,   2        ,     Tx      ,
      Fie,| coward | woman and | soft-hearted wretch,
        ,                x          ,           ,    ,
      Hast thou | not spirit | to curse | thine e|nemy?
 
SUFFOLK
           ,       ,            ,     ,        2      ,
      A plague | upon | them: where|fore should I | curse them?
             ,        ,         ,     .   T    T      T
      Would cur|ses kill,| as doth | the mandrake's groan,
          ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      I would | invent | as bit|ter-sear|ching terms,
            ,          ,          ,     ,         ,
      As cursed,| as harsh,| and hor|rible | to hear,
         ,          ,         ,          ,       ,
      Deli|vered strong|ly through | my fix|ed teeth,
             ,        ,      ,          ,       ,
      With full | as ma|ny signs | of dead|ly hate,
           ,     ,    ,               ,          ,
      As lean-|faced En/vy in | her loath|some cave:
            ,              ,       ,         ,         ,
      My tongue | should stum|ble in | mine^ear|nest words,
             ,             ,        ,         ,        ,
      Mine^eyes | should spar|kle like | the bea|ten flint;
           ,         ,         ,        ,         ,
      My hair | be fixed | on end,| as one | distract;
       T     Tx    T              ,         ,          ,
      Aye, every joint | should seem | to curse | and ban,
          ,      ,        ,          ,             ,
      And e|ven now | my bur|dened heart | would break,
                  ,    ,            ,       ,           ,
      Should I / not curse | them. Poi|son be | their drink.
        T     T     .    T          ,    2     ,           ,
      Gall, worse than gall,| the dain|tiest that | they taste:
              ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      Their swee|test shade | a grove | of cy|press trees:
              ,         ,        ,    2     ,      ,
      Their chief|est pros|pect mur|dering bas|ilisks:
             ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      Their sof|test touch | as smart | as li|zards'^stings:
             ,        ,        ,        ,           ,
      Their mu|sic fright|ful as | the ser|pent's hiss,
           ,         ,       T     T   .   T         ,
      And bo|ding screech-|owls, make the con|cert full.
       T   .    T   T              ,   ,        ,
      All the foul ter|rors in / dark-sea|ted hell--
 
QUEEN MARGARET
         ,       ,    ,                     ,          ,
      Enough | sweet Suf/folk; thou | tormentst | thyself;
         2         ,      ,         ,         T  .   T     T
      And these* dread | curses,| like the | sun against glass,
           ,       ,        ,     ___       ,
      Or like | an o|vercharged | gun,| recoil,
            ,          ,          ,      ,         ,
      And turn | the force | of them | upon | thyself.
 
SUFFOLK
            ,        ,          ,         ,         ,
      You bade | me ban,| and will | you bid | me leave?
       ,              ,          ,       ,          ,
      Now by | the ground | that I | am ba|nished from,
        ,              ,       ,       ,          ,
      Well could | I curse | away | a win|ter's night,
               ,        ,      ,       ,        ,
      Though stan|ding na|ked on | a moun|tain top,
             ,        ,           ,             ,     ,
      Where bi|ting cold | would ne|ver let / grass grow,
            ,         ,       ,        ,          ,
      And think | it but | a mi|nute spent | in sport.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
          ,      2    ,            ,       ,             ,
      Oh let | me entreat | thee cease.| Give me | thy hand,
        ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      That I | may dew | it with | my mourn|ful tears:
           ,          ,        ,       ,           ,
      Nor let | the rain | of hea|ven wet | this place,
           ,      ,        ,       ,      ,
      To wash | away | my woe|ful mon|uments.
       ,                 ,         ,       ,         ,
      Oh, could | this kiss | be prin|ted in | thy hand,
             ,              ,       ,           ,         ,
      That thou | mightst think | upon | these by | the seal,
                ,        ,         ,             ,            ,
      Through whom | a thou|sand sighs | are breathed | for thee.
          ,           ,         ,         ,         ,
      So get | thee gone,| that I | may know | my grief,
            ,         ,        ,                ,        ,
      'Tis but | surmised | whiles thou | art stan|ding by,
          ,          ,           ,        ,       ,
      As one | that sur|feits, think|ing on | a want;
          ,        ,           ,        ,        ,
      I will | repeal | thee, or | be well | assured,
         ,        ,       ,     ,        ,
      Adven|ture to | be ba|nished | myself:
           ,     ,       ,       ,           ,
      And ba|nished | I am,| if but | from thee.
       T    T    T      2    ,      ,         ,
      Go, speak not | to me; e|ven now | be gone.
          ,        ,      2    ,            ,            ,
      Oh go | not yet.| Even thus | two* friends | condemned
          ,           ,          ,           ,          ,
      Embrace | and kiss | and take | ten* thou|sand leaves,
       ,           ,         ,          ,          ,
      Loather | a hun|dred times | to part | than die;
           ,          ,          ,         ,           ,
      Yet now | farewell,| and fare|well life | with thee.
 
SUFFOLK
        ,              ,        ,      ,    ,
      Thus is | poor* Suf|folk ten | times ba/nished;
        ,    2        ,           T     T      T          ,
      Once by the | king, and | three times thrice | by thee.
            ,          ,        ,           ,            ,
      'Tis not | the land | I care | for, wert | thou thence,
         ,       ,        ,     ,       ,
      A wil|derness | is pop|ulous | enough,
          ,        ,           x       ,     ,
      So Suf|folk had | thy heaven|ly com|pany:
            ,           ,      ,              ,         ,
      For where | thou art,| there is | the world | itself,
           ,       ,   2     ,        ,         ,
      With e|very sev|eral plea|sure in | the world,
            ,       T   T   T     ,    ,
      And where | thou art not,| deso|lation.
         ,         ,      ,             ,          ,
      I can | no more:| live thou | to joy | thy life;
          ,        ,          ,           ,           ,
      Myself | no joy | in nought,| but that | thou livst.
 
[Enter VAUX]
 
QUEEN MARGARET
        ,    2         ,         ,            ,       ,
      Whither goes | Vaux so | fast? What | news I | prithee?
 
VAUX
          ,     ,      ,        ,     ,
      To sig|nify | unto | his ma|jesty
            ,    2     ,        ,        ,          ,
      That Car|dinal Beau|fort is | at point | of death:
           ,      ,       ,         ,           x
      For sud|denly | a grie|vous sick|ness took him,
             ,           ,          ,           ,          ,
      That makes | him gasp | and stare | and catch | the air,
           ,        ,         ,        ,         ,
      Blasphe|ming God | and cur|sing men | on earth.
        ,             ,         ,          ,           ,
      Sometime | he talks,| as if | Duke^Humph|rey's ghost
            ,         ,          ,         ,           ,
      Were by | his side:| sometime | he calls | the king,
            ,        ,        ,        ,       ,
      And whis|pers to | his pil|low, as | to him,
           ,        ,       ,      ,        ,
      The se|crets of | his o|verchar|ged soul,
          ,        ,         ,         ,    ,
      And I | am sent | to tell | his ma|jesty
           ,      ,         ,        ,         ,
      That e|ven now | he cries | aloud | for him.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
           ,          ,      ,        ,         ,
      Go tell | this hea|vy mes|sage to | the king.
 
[Exit VAUX]
       T   T    T      2       ,            ,          ,
      Aye me! What | is this world?| What news | are these!
            ,           ,     ,   2       T      T    T
      But where|fore grieve | I at an | hour's poor loss,
        ,          x           ,         ,        ,
      Omit|ting Suffolk's | exile,| my soul's | treasure?
           ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      Why on|ly Suf|folk mourn | I not | for thee?
       ,              ,           ,          ,         ,
      And with | the sou|thern clouds | contend | in tears,
         ,      2         ,          ,      ,              ,
      Theirs for the | earth's in|crease, mine / for my | sorrows.
           ,           ,           ,            ,         ,       ->
      Now get | thee hence,| the king | thou knowst | is com||ing,
       ,             ,      ,            ,          ,
      If thou | be found | by me,| thou art | but dead.
 
SUFFOLK
         ,       ,           ,       ,        ,
      If I | depart | from thee,| I can|not live,
           ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
      And in | thy sight | to die,| what were | it else,
            ,        ,         ,       ,        ,
      But like | a plea|sant slum|ber in | thy lap?
        ,               ,           ,       ,        ,
      Here could | I breathe | my soul | into | the air,
           ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      As mild | and gen|tle as | the cra|dle-babe,
       ,            ,         ,        ,           ,
      Dying | with mo|ther's dug | between | its lips:
              ,          ,          ,         ,       ,
      Where from | thy sight,| I should | be ra|ging mad,
           ,     ,                    ,    ,          ,
      And cry | out for | thee to / close up | mine^eyes:
           ,           ,          ,         ,         ,
      To have | thee with | thy lips | to stop | my mouth:
             ,            ,        ,        ,        ,
      So shouldst | thou ei|ther turn | my fly|ing soul,
       ,  2            ,          ,     ,        ,
      Or I should | breathe it | so in|to thy | body,
            ,         ,          ,       ,    ,
      And then | it lived | in sweet | Ely|sium.
          ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      To die | by thee,| were but | to die | in jest,
             ,        ,          ,         ,           ,
      From thee | to die | were tor|ture more | than death:
          ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      Oh let | me stay,| befall | what may | befall.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
        ,            ,        ,       ,     2    ,      ->
      Away:| though par|ting be | a fret|ful corro||sive,
       ,           ,    ,       ,         ,
      It | is ap/plied to | a death|ful wound.
            ,       T      Tx     T         ,           ,
      To France | sweet Suffolk: let | me hear | from thee:
            ,      ,          ,                ,       ,
      For where|soere | thou art | in this / world's globe,
             ,       ,       ,            ,          ,
      I'll have | an I|ris that | shall find | thee out.
 
SUFFOLK
         ,
      I go.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
                 ,         ,            ,    oo
           And take | my heart | with thee.|
 
SUFFOLK
         ,        ,      ,          ,           ,
      A je|wel locked | into | the woe|fullst cask
           ,      ,         ,        ,          ,
      That e|ver did | contain | a thing | of worth,
      ,        2    ,         ,        ,       ,
      Even | as a split|ted bark,| so sun|der we:
            ,         ,        ,
      This way | fall I | to death.
 
QUEEN MARGARET
                                          ,         ,
                                    This way | for me.
 
[Exeunt severally]

← Previous Scene | Next Scene →


Home