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Henry VI part two

Act I, Scene 2

GLOUCESTER'S house.
 
[Enter GLOUCESTER and his DUCHESS]
 
DUCHESS
             ,          ,         ,      ,         ,
      Why droops | my lord | like^o|ver-ri|pened corn,
        ,             ,        ,        ,    2     ,
      Hanging | the head | at Ce|res' plen|teous load?
       ,      2        T     T    T         ,          ,
      Why doth the | great Duke Humph|rey knit | his brows,
           ,        ,        ,       ,         ,
      As frow|ning at | the fa|vors of | the world?
       ,                ,      ,             ,        ,
      Why are | thine^eyes | fixed to | the sul|len earth,
       ,            ,            ,         ,          ,
      Gazing | on that | which seems | to dim | thy sight?
             ,            ,           ,        ,   ,
      What seest | thou there?| King^Hen|ry's di|adem,
           ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      Enchased | with all | the ho|nors of | the world?
          ,         ,        ,       ,         ,
      If so,| gaze^on,| and gro|vel on | thy face,
         ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      Until | thy head | be cir|cled with | the same.
            ,           ,      ,             ,    2     ,
      Put forth | thy hand,| reach at | the glo|rious gold.
        ,     2            ,            ,        ,          ,
      What, is it | too* short?| I'll leng|then it | with mine:
           ,        ,       ,         ,         ,
      And ha|ving both | toge|ther heaved | it up,
              ,       ,        ,          ,           x
      We'll both | toge|ther lift | our heads | to heaven,
           ,       ,       ,          ,         ,
      And ne|ver more | abase | our sight | so low,
                ,    ,     T     T    T   2       ,
      As to / vouchsafe | one glance un|to the ground.
 
GLOUCESTER
      .   T     T     T         ,           ,          ,
      O Nell, sweet Nell,| if thou | dost love | thy lord,
       ,            ,       ,      ,           ,
      Banish | the can|ker of | ambi|tious thoughts:
           ,            ,           ,     ,       ,
      And may | that thought,| when I | ima|gine ill
          ,          ,         ,        ,    2    ,    ->
      Against | my king | and ne|phew, vir|tuous He|nry,
       ,        ,      ,           2      ,        ,
      Be | my last | breathing | in this mor|tal world.
           ,          ,            ,            ,        ,
      My trou|blous dream | this night | doth make | me sad.
 
DUCHESS
              ,           ,      ,             ,           x
      What dreamed | my lord?| Tell me,| and I'll | requite it
             ,         ,       ,       ,           ,
      With sweet | rehear|sal of | my mor|ning's dream.
 
GLOUCESTER
           ,             ,           ,        ,          ,
      Methought | this staff | mine of|fice-badge | in court
            ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      Was broke | in twain;| by whom | I have | forgot,
           ,       ,         ,      2     ,     ,
      But as | I think,| it was | by the car|dinal;
           ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      And on | the pie|ces of | the bro|ken wand
              ,           ,         ,        ,        ,      , ->
      Were placed | the heads | of Ed|mund Duke | of So||merset,
           ,      3  3     ,            ,          x
      And Wil|liam de la Pole,| first^duke | of Suffolk.
        ,             ,       ,              ,          ,
      This was | my dream:| what it | doth bode,| God knows.
 
DUCHESS
       ,               ,        ,        ,     ,
      Tut, this | was no|thing but | an ar|gument,
            ,           ,         ,           ,            ,
      That he | that breaks | a stick | of Glouce|ster's grove,
              ,          ,         ,        ,        o
      Shall lose | his head | for his | presump|tion.
            ,        ,        ,               ,     ,
      But list | to me,| my Humph|rey, my / sweet duke:
           ,         ,         ,        ,     ,
      Methought | I sat | in seat | of ma|jesty
       ,          ,          ,          ,   ,
      In the | cathe|dral church | of West|minster,
           ,          ,             ,            ,            ,
      And in | that chair | where kings | and queens | are crowned;
             ,             ,   ,           ,          ,
      Where Hen|ry and / dame Mar|garet kneeled | to me
           ,        ,         ,         ,   ,
      And on | my head | did set | the di|adem.
 
GLOUCESTER
          ,     ,           ,        ,          ,
      Nay^E|leanor,| then must | I chide | outright:
          ,     2     ,         ,        ,     ,
      Presump|tuous dame,| ill-nur|tured E|leanor,
            ,         ,       ,      ,         ,
      Art thou | not se|cond wo|man in | the realm?
       ,            ,          ,        ,         ,
      And the | protec|tor's wife,| beloved | of him?
             ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      Hast thou | not world|ly plea|sure at | command,
         ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
      Above | the reach | or com|pass of | thy thought?
            ,           ,         ,    2      ,      ,
      And wilt | thou still | be ham|mering trea|chery,
          ,        ,         ,         ,         ,
      To tum|ble down | thy hus|band, and | thyself,
            ,        ,       ,       ,         ,
      From top | of ho|nor, to | disgra|ce's feet?
        ,          ,        ,         ,         ,
      Away | from me,| and let | me hear | no more.
 
DUCHESS
        T     T    .   T     ,         ,      ,
      What, what, my lord?| Are you | so cho|leric
           ,     ,         ,        ,          ,
      With E|leanor,| for tel|ling but | her dream?
             ,           ,          ,      ,         ,
      Next^time | I'll keep | my dreams | unto | myself,
           ,          ,
      And not | be checked.
 
GLOUCESTER
                            T   T  T     ,
                           Nay be not | angry,
      ,         ,        ,
      I am | pleased a|gain.   \\
 
[Enter Messenger]
 
MESSENGER
           ,        ,         ,          ,          ,       2->
      My lord | protec|tor, 'tis | his high|ness' plea||sure
           ,        ,         ,       ,          ,       ->
      You do | prepare | to ride | unto | Saint^Al||ban's,
        ,       2      ,          ,          ,         ,
      Where | as the king | and queen | do mean | to hawk.
 
GLOUCESTER
         ,     T    T    T           ,          ,
      I go.| Come Nell thou | wilt ride | with us?
 
[Exeunt GLOUCESTER and Messenger]
 
DUCHESS
       ,              ,          ,       ,       ,
      Yes my | good lord,| I'll fol|low pre|sently.
       ,           ,       ,       ,       ,
      Follow | I must;| I can|not go | before,
               ,          ,            ,         ,        ,
      While Glouce|ster bears | this base | and hum|ble mind.
           ,      ,        ,          ,         ,
      Were^I | a man,| a duke,| and next | of blood,
      ,             ,           ,   2     ,           ,
      I would | remove | these te|dious stum|bling-blocks,
             ,         ,      ,            ,         ,
      And smooth | my way | upon | their head|less necks;
           ,    2   ,      ,         ,         ,
      And be|ing a wo|man, I | will not | be slack
           ,         ,        ,    T     T  T
      To play | my part | in For|tune's pageant.
             ,           ,          ,           ,         ,
      Where^are | you there?| Sir John;| nay* fear | not man,
          ,       ,             ,          ,        ,
      We are | alone;| here's none | but thee | and I.
 
[Enter HUME]
 
HUME
       ,           ,           ,      ,    ,
      Jesus | preserve | your roy|al ma|jesty.
 
DUCHESS
             ,            ,     ,      ,         ,
      What sayst | thou? Ma|jesty:| I am | but grace.
 
HUME
           ,         ,         ,          ,          ,
      But by | the grace | of God,| and Hume's | advice,
            ,        ,       ,         ,      ,
      Your gra|ce's ti|tle shall | be mul|tiplied.
 
DUCHESS
             ,           ,      ,             ,          ,
      What sayst | thou man?| Hast thou | as yet | conferred
            ,           ,   ,         ,         ,
      With Mar|gery / Jourdain,| the cun|ning witch,
            ,      ,       ,          ,     ,
      With Ro|ger Bo|lingbroke,| the con|jurer?
            ,          ,      ,        ,        ,
      And will | they un|dertake | to do | me good?
 
HUME
        ,      2        ,     ,         ,           ,
      This they have | promi|sed to | show your | highness
         ,         ,            ,         ,        ,
      A spi|rit raised | from depth | of un|der-ground,
        T    T     T     ,            ,      ,
      That shall make | answer | to such | questions,
          ,          ,            ,        ,       ,
      As by | your grace | shall be | propoun|ded him.
 
DUCHESS
       ,   2    ,             ,      ,          ,
      It is e|nough, I'll | think u|pon the | questions:
        ,                ,        ,        ,        ,
      When from | Saint^Al|ban's we | do make | return,
             ,             ,        ,       ,         ,
      We'll see | these^things | effec|ted to | the full.
        T    T     T        2    ,          ,      ,
      Here Hume, take | this reward;| make^mer|ry man,
            ,        ,      ,      2       ,        ,
      With^thy | confe|derates | in this weigh|ty cause.
 
[Exit]
 
HUME
        ,           ,   ,                 ,          ,
      Hume must | make mer/ry with | the du|chess' gold;
       ,   2        ,               ,    T    T    T
      Marry and | shall: But | how now, Sir John Hume?
            ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Seal^up | your lips,| and give | no words | but mum,
           ,         ,       ,       ,     ,
      The bus|iness as|keth si|lent se|crecy.
           ,      ,     T     T    .   T           ,
      Dame^E|leanor | gives gold, to bring | the witch:
        T   T  .    T       ,          ,        x
      Gold cannot come | amiss,| were she | a devil.
            ,        ,      ,            ,        ,
      Yet have | I gold | flies from | ano|ther coast:
          ,         ,                 ,   ,     ,
      I dare | not say,| from the / rich car|dinal,
       ,      2        ,          T    T    T        ,       ->
      And from the | great and | new-made Duke | of Suf||folk,
       ,     2     ,        ,    ,            ,
      Yet | I do find | it so:| for to | be plain,
              ,     2     ,      ,        ,       ,     2->
      They (know|ing Dame^E|leanor's | aspi|ring hu||mor)
             ,      ,       ,      ,         ,
      Have hired | me to | under|mine the | duchess
            ,           ,     ,        ,         ,
      And buzz | these con|jura|tions in | her brain.
            ,        ,       ,            ,        ,      ->
      They say,| A craf|ty knave | does^need | no bro||ker,
       ,      2     x         2     ,      ,      ,
      Yet | am I Suffolk | and the car|dinal's | broker.
        ,     2        T   T    T          ,          ,
      Hume, if you | take not heed,| you shall | go near
           ,           ,        ,         ,        ,
      To call | them both | a pair | of craf|ty knaves.
        ,              ,           ,        ,         ,
      Well, so | it stands;| and thus | I fear | at last,
        ,     ,               ,         ,         ,
      Hume's kna/very | will be | the duch|ess' wreck,
           ,        ,    ,               ,           ,
      And her | attain|ture, will | be Humph|rey's fall:
        ,             ,    ,                ,         ,
      Sort how | it will,| I shall | have gold | for all.
 
[Exit]

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