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Henry VI part one

Act IV, Scene 1

 

Paris, at a hall of state.
 
[Enter KING HENRY VI, GLOUCESTER, BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, YORK, SUFFOLK, SOMERSET, WARWICK, TALBOT, EXETER, the Governor, of Paris, and others]
 
GLOUCESTER
             ,      ,          ,        ,         ,
      Lord bish|op set | the crown | upon | his head.
 
BISHOP OF WINCHESTER
       T    T    T     ,        2       ,          ,
      God save King | Henry | of that name | the sixth.
 
GLOUCESTER
           ,     ,        ,       ,           ,
      Now gov|ernor | of Par|is take | your oath,
            ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      That you | elect | no oth|er king | but him;
          ,            ,            ,        ,           ,
      Esteem | none friends,| but such | as are | his friends,
            ,           ,          ,         ,          ,
      And none | your foes,| but such | as shall | pretend
         ,         ,     ,        ,           ,
      Mali|cious prac|tices | against | his state:
             ,         ,        ,          ,         ,
      This^shall | ye do,| so help | you right|eous God.
 
[Enter FALSTAFF]
 
FALSTAFF
          ,         ,     2     ,       ,          ,    ,  ->
      My gra|cious sov|ereign, as | I rode | from Cal||ais,
             ,       ,         ,    ,
      To | haste un|to your | coro|nation:
         ,       ,       ,        ,        ,
      A let|ter was | deliv|ered to | my hands,
        ,              ,         2      ,        ,      ,
      Writ to | your grace,| from the Duke | of Bur|gundy.
 
TALBOT
        ,              ,        ,      ,        ,
      Shame to | the Duke | of Bur|gundy,| and thee:
          ,       T     T      T     2      ,           ,
      I vowed |(base knight) when | I did meet | thee next,
           ,         ,        ,         ,         ,
      To tear | the gar|ter from | thy crav|en's leg,
        ,              ,        ,       ,      ,
      Which I | have done,| because (unworth|ily)
             ,        ,       ,          ,        ,
      Thou wast | instal|led in | that high | degree.
       ,            ,        ,       ,          ,
      Pardon | me prince|ly Hen|ry, and | the rest:
            ,         ,        ,       ,      ,
      This das|tard, at | the bat|tle of | Patay,
             ,        ,             ,    ,          ,
      When (but | in all)| I was / six thous|and strong,
            ,           ,           ,       ,        ,
      And that | the French | were al|most ten | to one,
          ,        ,         ,         ,           x
      Before | we met,| or that | a stroke | was given,
        ,           ,        ,          ,       ,
      Like to | a trust|y squire,| did run | away.
           ,         ,          ,           ,        ,
      In which | assault,| we lost^|twelve^hund|red men.
          ,         ,       ,      ,        ,
      Myself,| and div|ers gent|lemen | beside,
             ,           ,          ,       ,     ,
      Were there | surprised,| and tak|en pris|oners.
             ,       ,     ,                   ,       ,
      Then judge |(great lords)/ if I | have done | amiss:
          ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      Or wheth|er that | such cow|ards ought | to wear
            ,     ,         ,           ,        ,
      This orn|ament | of knight|hood, yea | or no?
 
GLOUCESTER
          ,          ,            ,         ,     ,
      To say | the truth,| this fact | was in|famous,
           ,        ,      ,     ,       ,
      And ill | beseem|ing an|y com|mon man;
             ,        ,         ,         ,       ,      2->
      Much more | a knight,| a cap|tain, and | a lea||der.
 
TALBOT
             ,           ,      ,         ,          ,
      When first | this ord|er was | ordained | my lords,
         ,              ,        ,        ,       ,
      Knights of | the gar|ter were | of nob|le birth;
       ,  2          ,    2      ,         ,        ,      ->
      Valiant,| and vir|tuous, full | of haught|y cour||age,
        ,      2       ,          ,      ,         ,
      Such | as were grown | to cred|it by | the wars:
            ,        ,            ,        ,         ,
      Not fear|ing death,| nor shrink|ing for | distress,
           ,       ,     ,         ,         ,
      But al|ways res|olute,| in most | extremes.
           ,               ,    ,         ,          ,
      He then,| that is / not furn|ished in | this sort,
        ,           ,         ,        ,          ,
      Doth but | usurp | the sac|red name | of knight,
          ,     2       ,     ,    ,       ,
      Profan|ing this most | honor|able | order,
             ,        ,         ,            ,   ,
      And should |(if I | were worth|y to / be judge)
           ,         ,        ,        ,           ,
      Be quite | degra|ded, like | a hedge-|born swain,
             ,         ,         ,         ,        ,
      That doth | presume | to boast | of gent|le blood.
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,              ,             ,     ,           ,
      Stain to | thy count|rymen,/ thou hearst | thy doom:
           ,        ,           ,           ,         ,
      Be pack|ing there|fore, thou | that wast | a knight:
             ,         ,        ,         ,         ,
      Henceforth | we ban|ish thee | on pain | of death.
           ,     ,       ,         ,         ,
      And now| lord pro|tector,| view the | letter
        ,              ,       ,        ,      ,
      Sent from | our unc|le Duke | of Bur|gundy.
 
GLOUCESTER
             ,           ,           ,           ,            ,
      What means | his grace,| that he | hath changed | his style?
           ,          ,           ,         ,         ,
      No more | but plain | and blunt|ly? (To | the king).
            ,       ,        ,        ,      ,
      Hath he | forgot | he is | his sov|ereign?
           ,           ,        ,      ,      ,
      Or doth | this churl|ish sup|erscrip|tion
           ,          ,    ,             ,    ,
      Pretend | some alt|era|tion in / good will?
               ,         ,       ,      ,        ,
      What's here? | I have | upon | espe|cial cause,
        ,              ,        ,        ,          ,
      Moved with | compas|sion of | my count|ry's wreck,
          ,       ,         ,    ,          ,
      Togeth|er with | the pit|iful | complaints
           ,         ,        ,         ,        ,
      Of such | as your | oppres|sion feeds | upon,
          ,       ,        ,        ,     ,
      Forsa|ken your | perni|cious fac|tion,
             ,             ,            ,         ,          ,
      And joined | with Charles,| the right|ful King | of France.
         ,           ,      ,         ,        ,
      O monst|rous treach|ery:| can this | be so?
            ,      ,        ,   ,         ,
      That in | alli|ance, am|ity,| and oaths,
               ,          ,            ,         ,          ,
      There should | be found | such false | dissem|bling guile?
 
KING HENRY VI
        ,              ,      ,      ,       ,
      What? Doth | my unc|le Bur|gundy | revolt?
 
GLOUCESTER
           ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
      He doth | my lord,| and is | become | your foe.
 
KING HENRY VI
           ,          ,           ,        ,         ,
      Is that | the worst | this let|ter doth | contain?
 
GLOUCESTER
          ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      It is | the worst,| and all |(my lord)| he writes.
 
KING HENRY VI
            ,          ,        ,             ,          ,
      Why then | Lord^Tal|bot there | shall talk | with him,
            ,          ,    ,              ,       ,
      And give | him chas|tisement | for this | abuse.
           ,                ,    ,         ,         ,
      How say | you (my / lord) are | you not | content?
 
TALBOT
           ,         ,      ,      2       ,   2     ,
      Content,| my liege?| Yes: but that | I am prev|ented,
           ,             ,         ,            ,         ,
      I should | have begged | I might | have been | employed.
 
KING HENRY VI
            ,          ,            ,        ,          ,
      Then gath|er strength,| and march | unto | him straight:
       ,     2      ,          ,         ,           ,
      Let him per|ceive how | ill we | brook his | treason,
            ,        ,         ,        ,            ,
      And what | offense | it is | to flout | his friends.
 
TALBOT
         ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      I go | my lord,| in heart | desir|ing still
           ,        ,        ,       ,          ,
      You may | behold | confu|sion of | your foes.
 
[Exit. Enter VERNON and BASSET]
 
VERNON
        ,             ,        ,         ,      ,
      Grant me | the com|bat, gra|cious sov|ereign.
 
      BASSET
           ,        ,           ,        ,       ,
      And me |(my lord)| grant me | the com|bat too.
 
YORK
        ,           ,          ,         ,        ,
      This is | my serv|ant, hear | him nob|le prince.
 
SOMERSET
            ,         ,           ,       ,      ,
      And this | is mine |(sweet Hen|ry) fav|or him.
 
KING HENRY VI
          ,         ,           ,           ,          ,
      Be pa|tient lords,| and give | them leave | to speak.
           ,      ,           ,           ,        ,
      Say gent|lemen,| what makes | you thus | exclaim,
            ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
      And where|fore crave | you com|bat? or | with whom?
 
VERNON
            ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      With him |(my lord)| for he | hath done | me wrong.
 
      BASSET
          ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      And I | with him,| for he | hath done | me wrong.
 
KING HENRY VI
            ,          ,           ,         ,         ,
      What is | that wrong,| whereof | you both | complain?
        ,              ,          ,          ,       ,
      First let | me know,| and then | I'll ans|wer you.
 
      BASSET
        ,             ,          ,        ,       ,
      Crossing | the sea,| from Eng|land in|to France,
            ,        ,          ,   2     ,         ,
      This fel|low here,| with en|vious carp|ing tongue,
          ,       ,      ,          ,        ,
      Upbrai|ded me | about | the rose | I wear,
       ,            ,    ,    ,                 ,
      Saying,| the san|guine col/or of | the leaves
           ,      ,        ,          ,          ,
      Did rep|resent | my mast|er's blush|ing cheeks:
             ,       ,       ,        ,          ,
      When stub|bornly | he did | repugn | the truth,
         ,       ,         ,        ,        ,
      About | a cert|ain ques|tion in | the law,
       ,           ,           ,         ,         ,
      Argued | betwixt | the Duke | of York,| and him:
            ,       ,         ,    ,    2    ,
      With oth|er vile | and ig|nomin|ious terms.
          ,     ,             ,     ,         ,
      In con|futa|tion of / which rude | reproach
           ,        ,        ,     ,      ,
      And in | defense | of my | lord's worth/iness,
          ,          ,    ,        ,         ,
      I crave | the ben|efit | of law | of arms.
 
VERNON
            ,        ,      ,        ,       ,
      And that | is my | peti|tion (nob|le lord:)
             ,          ,          ,         ,         ,
      For though | he seem | with for|ged quaint | conceit
          ,        ,        ,         ,        ,
      To set | a gloss | upon | his bold | intent,
            ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      Yet know |(my lord)| I was | provoked | by him,
           ,           ,       ,         ,          ,
      And he | first^took | excep|tions at | this badge,
           ,         ,          ,        ,           x
      Pronoun|cing that | the pale|ness of | this flower
           ,           ,         ,       ,          ,
      Bewrayed | the faint|ness of | my mast|er's heart.
 
YORK
            ,          ,       ,     ,         ,
      Will not | this mal|ice Som|erset | be left?
 
SOMERSET
            ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Your priv|ate grudge | my Lord | of York,| will out,
               ,        ,       ,        ,        ,
      Though nere | so cun|ningly | you smoth|er it.
 
KING HENRY VI
             ,          ,         ,          ,         ,
      Good Lord,| what mad|ness rules | in brain|sick men,
            ,         ,            ,     ,        ,
      When for | so slight | and fri|volous | a cause,
            ,         ,   ,         ,        ,
      Such fac|tious em|ula|tions shall | arise?
            ,         ,         ,         ,     ,
      Good cous|ins both | of York | and Som|erset,
       ,             ,         ,         ,        ,
      Quiet | yourselves |(I pray)| and be | at peace.
 
YORK
            ,        ,         ,          ,          ,
      Let this | dissen|sion first | be tried | by fight,
            ,           ,         ,          ,        ,
      And then | your high|ness shall | command | a peace.
 
SOMERSET
            ,        ,         ,         ,      ,
      The quar|rel touch|eth none | but us | alone,
          ,           ,          ,       ,         ,
      Betwixt | ourselves | let us | decide | it then.
 
YORK
        ,              ,         ,        ,     ,
      There is | my pledge,| accept | it Som|erset.
 
VERNON
       ,              ,           ,      ,         ,
      Nay, let | it rest | where it | began | at first.
 
      BASSET
           ,        ,         ,    ,       ,
      Confirm | it so,| mine^hon|ora|ble lord.
 
GLOUCESTER
           ,        ,        ,       ,           ,
      Confirm | it so?| Confoun|ded be | your strife,
           ,       ,          ,       ,         ,
      And per|ish ye | with your | auda|cious prate,
           ,    2    ,         ,         ,        ,
      Presump|tuous vas|sals, are | you not | ashamed
             ,       ,        ,           ,  ,
      With this | immod|est clam|orous / outrage
           ,       ,        ,           ,         ,
      To troub|le and | disturb | the king,| and us?
           ,         ,          ,          ,         ,
      And you | my lords,| methinks | you do | not well
           ,           ,          ,        ,     ,
      To bear | with their | perverse | objec|tions:
             ,         ,       ,        ,             ,
      Much less | to take | occa|sion from | their mouths,
           ,        ,    ,       ,            ,
      To raise | a mut|iny | betwixt | yourselves.
           ,        ,           ,       ,         ,
      Let me | persuade | you take | a bet|ter course.
 
EXETER
            ,            ,
      It grieves | his high|ness,
                                    ,         ,           ,
                                  Good | my lords,| be friends.
 
KING HENRY VI
             ,      ,           ,         ,      ,
      Come hith|er you | that would | be com|batants:
             ,          ,           ,         ,         ,     ->
      Henceforth | I charge | you, as | you love | our fav||or,
        ,       2    ,           ,        ,          ,
      Quite | to forget | this quar|rel, and | the cause.
           ,         ,        ,        ,         ,
      And you | my lords:| remem|ber where | we are,
            ,         ,         ,      ,    2    ,       ->
      In France,| amongst | a fick|le wav|ering na||tion:
       ,       2     ,         ,        ,         ,
      If | they perceive | dissen|sion in | our looks
            ,         ,         ,         ,     ,
      And that | within | ourselves | we dis|agree;
       ,                 ,         ,        ,        ,
      How will | their grudg|ing stom|achs be | provoked
          ,       ,    ,     ,       2   ,
      To wil|ful dis|obed|ience,| and rebel?
          ,          ,    ,          ,        ,
      Beside,| what in|famy | will there | arise,
            ,         ,        ,         ,      ,
      When for|eign prin|ces shall | be cer|tified,
            ,       ,        ,         ,       ,
      That for | a toy,| a thing | of no | regard,
            ,         ,           ,        ,    ,
      King Hen|ry's peers,| and chief | nobil|ity,
           ,             ,           ,          ,           ,
      Destroyed | themselves,| and lost | the realm | of France?
          ,        ,        ,    ,     2      ,
      O think | upon | the con|quest of my | father,
          ,        ,          ,        ,         ,
      My tend|er years,| and let | us not | forego
            ,       ,         ,           ,            ,
      That for | a tri|fle, that | was bought | with blood.
       ,           ,   ,              ,          ,
      Let me | be um|pire in | this doubt|ful strife:
         ,        ,       ,       ,           ,
      I see | no reas|on if | I wear | this rose,
           ,     ,             ,         ,      ,        2->
      That an|y one | should there|fore be | suspi||cious
          ,        ,         ,     ,           ,
      I more | incline | to Som|erset,| than York:
        ,            ,         ,        ,           ,
      Both are | my kin|smen, and | I love | them both.
           ,          ,        ,          ,         ,
      As well | they may | upbraid | me with | my crown,
          ,          ,           ,         ,           ,
      Because |(forsooth)| the king | of Scots | is crowned.
            ,        ,         ,       ,         ,
      But your | discre|tions bet|ter can | persuade,
           ,      ,      ,        ,          ,
      Than I | am a|ble to | instruct | or teach:
            ,          ,        ,       ,         ,
      And there|fore, as | we hith|er came | in peace,
          ,         ,         ,       ,           ,
      So let | us still | contin|ue peace,| and love.
       ,            ,        ,      ,           ,
      Cousin | of York,| we in|stitute | your grace
          ,        ,       ,           ,           ,
      To be | our re|gent in | these parts | of France:
            ,         ,        ,     ,       ,
      And good | my Lord | of Som|erset,| unite
              ,          ,         ,          ,          ,
      Your troops | of horse|men with | his bands | of foot,
       .    T    T   T           ,      3    3    ,     ,
      And like true sub|jects, sons | of your progen|itors,
           ,       ,      ,        ,        ,
      Go cheer|fully | togeth|er, and | digest
            ,      ,       ,         ,    ,
      Your ang|ry cho|ler on | your en|emies.
           ,         ,        ,        ,          ,
      Ourself,| my lord | protec|tor, and | the rest,
       ,   2        ,          ,       ,        ,
      After some | respite,| will re|turn to | Calais;
              ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      From thence | to Eng|land, where | I hope | ere long
          ,       ,       ,         ,      ,
      To be | present|ed by | your vic|tories,
              ,       ,    ,                ,     2     ,
      With Charles,| Alen|con, and | that trait|orous rout.
 
[Flourish. Exeunt all but YORK, WARWICK, EXETER and VERNON]
 
WARWICK
           ,         ,        ,       ,          ,
      My Lord | of York,| I prom|ise you | the king
        ,  2          ,            ,         ,    ,
      Prettily |(methought)| did play | the or|ator.
 
YORK
           ,       ,         ,        ,        ,
      And so | he did,| but yet | I like | it not,
           ,         ,           ,         ,     ,
      In that | he wears | the badge | of Som|erset.
 
WARWICK
        ,               ,         ,        ,          ,
      Tush, that | was but | his fan|cy, blame | him not,
          ,         ,             ,           ,           ,
      I dare | presume |(sweet prince)| he thought | no harm.
 
YORK
           ,       ,        ,          ,         ,
      And if | I wish | he did. | But let | it rest,
       ,           ,          ,        ,     ,
      Other | affairs | must now | be man|aged.
 
[Exeunt all but EXETER]
 
EXETER
             ,            ,       ,        ,           ,
      Well didst | thou Rich|ard to | suppress | thy voice:
           ,         ,         ,         ,            ,
      For had | the pas|sions of | thy heart | burst^out,
          ,          ,            ,       ,          ,
      I fear | we should | have seen | deci|phered there
            ,    2      ,           ,    2   ,         ,
      More^ran|corous spite,| more fur|ious rag|ing broils,
            ,         ,     ,        ,        ,
      Than yet | can be | ima|gined or | supposed:
           ,     ,        ,       ,           ,
      But how|soere,| no simp|le man | that sees
            ,        ,    ,          ,    ,
      This jar|ring dis|cord of | nobil|ity,
             ,      2    ,        ,       ,         ,
      This shoul|dering of | each oth|er in | the court,
            ,         ,    2    ,          ,      ,
      This fac|tious ban|dying of | their fav|orites,
            ,         ,         ,          ,       ,
      But that | it doth | presage | some^ill | event.
             ,           ,        ,         ,           ,
      'Tis much,| when scep|tres are | in child|ren's hands:
            ,          ,       ,         ,       ,       ->
      But more,| when en|vy breeds | unkind | divis||ion,
        ,       ,           ,        2    ,        ,
      There | comes the | rain, there be|gins con|fusion.
 
[Exit]

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