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Henry VI part one

Act II, Scene 4

 

London, at the Temple-garden.
 
[Enter the Earls of SOMERSET, SUFFOLK, and WARWICK; RICHARD PLANTAGENET, VERNON, and another Lawyer]
 
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
        T     T    .   T     2      ,      ,           ,
      Great lords and gen|tlemen, what | means this | silence?
        T   T  T     ,         2    ,         ,
      Dare no man | answer | in a case | of truth?
 
SUFFOLK
          ,         ,        ,     ,              ,
      Within | the Tem|ple-hall | we were | too loud;
           ,        ,         ,        ,    ,
      The gar|den here | is more | conven|ient.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
            ,         ,       ,          ,           ,
      Then say | at once | if I | maintained | the truth;
           ,          ,         ,     ,      2     ,      ->
      Or else | was wran|gling Som|erset | in the er||ror?
 
SUFFOLK
        ,      2       ,       ,       ,        ,
      Faith | I have been | a tru|ant in | the law,
           ,      ,            ,          ,        ,
      And ne|ver yet | could frame | my will | to it;
            ,          ,          ,       ,        ,
      And there|fore frame | the law | unto | my will.
 
SOMERSET
        ,              ,        ,           ,           x
10    Judge you,| my Lord | of War|wick*, then | between us.
 
      [*the w in "wick" is silent]
 
WARWICK
          ,           ,             ,           ,       ,
      Between | two hawks,| which flies | the high|er pitch;
          ,           ,            ,          ,       ,
      Between | two dogs,| which hath | the deep|er mouth;
          ,           ,              ,          ,         x
      Between | two blades,| which bears | the bet|ter temper:
          ,          ,         ,            ,          ,
      Between | two hor|ses, which | doth bear | him best;
          ,           ,             ,         ,    2    ,
      Between | two girls,| which hath | the mer|riest eye;
          ,        ,            ,       ,     2     ,        ->
      I have | perhaps | some shal|low spi|rit of judg||ment;
       ,      2        ,      ,     ,                 ,
      But | in these nice | sharp quil/lets of | the law,
             ,        ,       ,       ,       ,
      Good faith | I am | no wis|er than | a daw.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
           ,      ,    2     ,      ,       ,
      Tut^tut,| here is a | manner|ly for|bearance:
            ,         ,         ,      ,        ,
20    The truth | appears | so na|ked on | my side
           ,     ,         ,          ,        ,
      That a|ny pur|blind^eye | may find | it out.
 
SOMERSET
         2    ,     ,        ,        ,      ,
      And on my | side it | is so | well ap|parelled,
           ,          ,       ,        ,    ,
      So clear,| so shin|ing and | so ev|ident
        ,    2         ,          ,          T     T    T
      That it will | glimmer | through a | blind man's eye.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
        ,                ,      ,             ,          ,
      Since you | are tongue-|tied and | so loath | to speak,
           ,        ,     ,          ,              ,
      In dumb | signif|icants | proclaim | your thoughts:
           ,      ,           ,     ,   ,
      Let him | that is | a true-|born gen/tleman
             ,       ,         ,      ,         ,
      And stands | upon | the hon|or of | his birth,
          ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      If he | suppose | that I | have plead|ed truth,
            ,           ,       ,         ,     ,
30    From off | this brier | pluck a | white rose / with me.
 
SOMERSET
       ,   ,        2         ,             ,     ,   2
      Let him / that is no | coward | nor* no | flatterer,
            ,         ,          ,      ,         ,
      But dare | maintain | the par|ty of | the truth,
        T   .  T    T          ,           ,           ,
      Pluck a red rose | from off | this thorn | with me.
 
WARWICK
          ,        ,        ,         ,         ,     2->
      I love | no col|ors, and | without | all col||or
           ,       ,   ,        ,     ,
      Of base | insin|ua|ting flat|tery
          ,            ,       ,              ,    ,
      I pluck | this white | rose with | Planta|genet.
 
SUFFOLK
          ,           ,      ,           ,    ,
      I pluck | this red | rose with | young Som/erset
           ,        ,        ,          ,          ,
      And say | withal | I think | he held | the right.
 
VERNON
        T    T    .   T      ,          ,          ,
      Stay lords and gen|tlemen,| and pluck | no more,
            ,         ,           ,      ,           ,
40    Till you | conclude | that he | upon | whose side
           ,       ,      ,        ,                ,
      The few|est ro|ses are | cropped from | the tree
              ,          ,      ,         ,        ,     2->
      Shall yield | the oth|er in | the right | opin||ion.
 
SOMERSET
            ,       ,         x       ,       ,
      Good Mas|ter Ver|non, it is | well ob|jected:
       ,  2        ,        2      ,         ,       2->
      If I have | fewest,| I subscribe | in sil||ence.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
                                                           ,
                                                       And I.
 
VERNON
        ,              ,           ,         ,         ,
      Then for | the truth | and plain|ness of | the case,
          ,            ,         ,        ,        ,
      I pluck | this pale | and mai|den blos|som here,
       ,           ,                   ,     ,    ,
      Giving | my ver|dict on the // white rose side.
 
SOMERSET
             ,          ,       ,         ,         ,
      Prick not | your fin|ger as | you pluck | it off,
             ,        ,         ,           ,           ,
50    Lest bleed|ing you | do paint | the white | rose^red
            ,        ,     T   T  .   T            ,
      And fall | on my | side so, against | your will.
 
VERNON
         ,        ,         ,      ,       ,
      If I,| my lord,| for my | opin|ion bleed,
        ,        ,         ,        ,        ,
      Opin|ion shall | be sur|geon to | my hurt
            ,        ,         ,            ,        ,
      And keep | me on | the side | where still | I am.
 
SOMERSET
       __     __          ,         ,    oo
      Well,| well,| come on:| who else?|
 
      Lawyer
          ,         ,     ,         ,          ,
      Unless | my stud|y and | my books | be false,
           ,     ,          ,          ,         ,
      The ar|gument | you held | was wrong | in you:
           ,          ,       ,     .   T     T   T
      In sign | whereof | I pluck | a white rose too.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
           ,     ,      ,              ,     ,
      Now Som|erset,| where is | your ar|gument?
 
SOMERSET
        ,            ,         ,    ,         ,
60    Here in | my scab|bard, med|itat|ing, that
             ,           ,       ,           ,      ,
      Shall dye | your white | rose in | a blood|y red.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
        ,     2          ,          ,       ,         ,
      Meantime your | cheeks do | counter|feit our | roses:
            ,           ,           ,        ,       ,
      For pale | they look | with fear,| as wit|nessing
            ,                ,
      The truth | on our / side.
 
SOMERSET
                                 ,        ,    ,
                                No | Planta|genet,
            ,          ,         ,       ,           ,
      'Tis not | for fear | but an|ger that | thy cheeks
        ,           T     T   .   T       ,         ,     2->
      Blush for | pure shame to coun|terfeit | our ros||es,
           ,           ,           ,         ,         ,     2->
      And yet | thy tongue | will not | confess | thy er||ror.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
            ,          ,        ,       ,      ,
      Hath not | thy rose | a cank|er, Som|erset?
 
SOMERSET
            ,          ,        ,          ,    ,
70    Hath not | thy rose | a thorn,| Planta|genet?
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
            ,           ,               ,   ,          ,
      Aye sharp | and pier|cing, to / maintain | his truth;
              ,        ,        ,       ,          ,          2->
      Whiles thy | consum|ing cank|er eats | his false||hood*.
 
SOMERSET
                     ,     ,           ,         ,        ,      ->
      Well, I'll / find friends | to wear | my bleed|ing ros||es,
        ,         2      ,         ,          ,         ,
      That | shall maintain | what I | have said | is true,
              ,          ,    ,      ,             ,
      Where false | Planta|genet | dare not | be seen.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
            ,         ,        ,       ,        ,
      Now* by | this mai|den blos|som in | my hand,
          ,           ,          ,         ,       ,
      I scorn | thee and | thy fash|ion, peev|ish boy.
 
SUFFOLK
            ,           ,           ,         ,    ,
      Turn not | thy scorns | this^way,| Planta|genet.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
        T     T   .   T          ,           ,          ,
      Proud Pole, I will,| and scorn | both him | and thee.
 
SUFFOLK
             ,         ,         ,       ,          ,
80    I'll turn | my part | thereof | into | thy throat.
 
SOMERSET
         ,      ,         ,        ,        ,
      Away,| away,| good Wil|liam de | la Pole,
           ,          ,       ,       ,         ,        2->
      We grace | the yeo|man by | conver|sing with || him.
 
WARWICK
           ,           ,            ,            ,     ,
      Now by | God's^will | thou wrongst | him, Som|erset;
            ,    ,    2       , 2       ,         ,
      His grand|father was | Lionel | Duke of | Clarence,
        ,    ,                    ,        ,        ,        ->
      Third son / to the | third^Ed|ward King | of Eng||land:
         ,       ,          ,           2     ,        ,
      Spring | crestless | yeomen | from so deep | a root?
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
           ,          ,         ,        ,     ,
      He bears | him on | the place|'s priv|ilege,
           ,          ,         ,        ,           ,
      Or durst | not for | his cra|ven heart | say thus.
 
SOMERSET
          ,           ,         ,          ,          ,
      By him | that made | me, I'll | maintain | my words
         ,      ,          ,           ,      ,
90    On a|ny plot | of ground | in Christ|endom.
           ,         ,         ,         ,        ,         o
      Was not | thy fa|ther, Rich|ard, Earl | of Cam|bridge,
            ,       ,   ,                 ,    ,      ,
      For trea|son ex|ecu|ted in our // late king's days?  (hex with prev)
         2    ,      ,          ,            ,       ,
      And by his | treason,| standst not | thou at|tainted,
          ,      3   3    ,          ,        ,       o
      Corrup|ted, and exempt | from an|cient gen|try?
            ,        ,            ,      ,         ,
      His tres|pass yet | lives^guil|ty in | thy blood;
            ,          ,        ,           ,       ,      2->
      And till | thou be | restored,| thou art | a yeo||man.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
          ,       ,         ,      ,       ,
      My fa|ther was | attached,| not at|tainted,
            ,         ,          ,      2     ,     ,
      Condemned | to die | for trea|son, but no | traitor;
            ,           ,         ,       ,          ,      ,  ->
      And that | I'll prove | on bet|ter men | than Som||erset,
             ,        ,          ,      3  3     ,
100   Were grow|ing time | once^rip|ened to my will.
            ,        ,       ,         ,          ,
      For your | partak|er Pole | and you | yourself,
             ,         ,        ,        ,    ,
      I'll note | you in | my book | of mem|ory,
            ,       ,              ,     ,        o
      To scourge | you for | this ap|prehen|sion:
        ,            ,         ,                ,     ,
      Look to | it well | and say | you are / well warned.
 
SOMERSET
       ,                 ,         ,     ,           ,
      Ah, thou | shalt find | us read|y for | thee still;
            ,        ,          ,       ,          ,
      And know | us by | these col|ors for | thy foes,
            ,           ,           ,          ,            ,
      For these | my friends | in spite | of thee | shall wear.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
           ,        ,           ,         ,       ,
      And by | my soul,| this pale | and an|gry rose,
          ,      ,               ,     ,         ,
      As cog|nizance | of my / blood-drink|ing hate,
           ,        ,     ,        ,         ,
110   Will I | for ev|er and | my fac|tion wear,
         ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      Until | it with|er with | me to | my grave
           ,        ,         ,          ,       ,
      Or flour|ish to | the height | of my | degree.
 
SUFFOLK
       ,  ,          2        ,           ,      ,
      Go for/ward and be | choked with | thy am|bition:
           ,        ,        ,        ,           ,
      And so | farewell | until | I meet | thee next.
 
[Exit]
 
SOMERSET
             ,            ,         ,        ,         ,       ->
      Have with | thee, Pole.| Farewell,| ambit|ious Rich||ard.
 
[Exit]
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
       ,     2      ,           ,         ,           x
      How | I am braved | and must | perforce | endure it?
 
WARWICK
             ,           ,        ,        ,            ,
      This blot | that they | object | against | your house
                   ,    ,               ,   ,      ,
      Shall be / wiped out | in the / next par|liament
         ,      2        ,         ,       ,           ,
      Called for the | truce of | Winche|ster and | Gloucester;
           ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
120   And if | thou be | not then | crea|ted York,
      ,     2        ,        ,      ,        ,
      I will not | live to | be ac|counted | Warwick.
           ,         ,       ,        ,         ,
      Meantime,| in sig|nal of | my love | to thee,
           ,      T     Tx  T          ,        ,
      Against | proud Somerset | and Will|iam Pole,
           ,     ,         ,       ,           ,
      Will I | upon | thy par|ty wear | this rose:
            ,       ,      ,          ,        ,
      And here | I pro|phesy:| this brawl | today,
        ,     2        ,         ,        ,       ,
      Grown to this | faction | in the | Temple-|garden,
              ,        ,          ,      ,              ,
      Shall send | between | the red | rose and | the white
          ,         ,          ,           ,       ,
      A thou|sand souls | to death | and dead|ly night.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
            ,       ,       ,        ,         ,
      Good Mas|ter Ver|non, I | am bound | to you,
            ,        ,       ,            ,          ,
130   That you | on my | behalf | would pluck | a flower.
 
VERNON
           ,        ,      ,              ,          ,
      In your | behalf | still will | I wear | the same.
 
      Lawyer
           ,        ,
      And so | will I.
 
RICHARD PLANTAGENET
                          __      ,       ___
                        Thanks,| gentle | sir.
        ,              ,        ,             ,   ,
      Come, let | us four | to din|ner: I / dare say
             ,               ,     ,        ,      ,
      This quar|rel will / drink blood | anoth|er day.
 
[Exeunt]

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