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Henry IV part two

Act I, Scene 1

The same.
 
[Enter LORD BARDOLPH]
 
LORD BARDOLPH
             ,           ,           ,     ,              ,
      Who* keeps | the gate | here* ho?| Where is | the earl?
 
[The Porter opens the gate]
 
PORTER
        ,             ,         ,
      What shall | I say | you are?
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                                     ,               ,
                                   Tell thou | the earl
                   ,   ,          ,        ,          ,
      That the / Lord Bar|dolph doth | attend | him here.
 
PORTER
            ,               ,     ,      ,  2       ,
      His lord|ship is / walked forth | into the | orchard,
         ,              ,        ,          ,         ,
      Please it | your ho|nor, knock | but at | the gate,
           ,        ,          ,     2
      And he | himself | will an|swer.
 
[Enter NORTHUMBERLAND]
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                                             ,           ,
                                      Here comes | the earl.
 
[Exit Porter]
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
             ,          ,          ,       ,       ,
      What news | Lord^Bar|dolph*? E|very mi|nute now
         ,             ,             ,    ,     ,
      Should be | the fa|ther of / some stra|tagem;
            ,           ,        ,          ,        ,
      The times | are wild:| conten|tion (like | a horse
        T   .   T   T         ,              ,     ,
      Full of high fee|ding) mad|ly hath / broke loose,
            ,       T   T   .  T
      And bears | down all before | him.
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                                          ,       ,
                                         No|ble earl,
          ,          ,         ,            ,    ,
      I bring | you cer|tain news | from Shrews|bury.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
        ,            x
      Good, and | heaven will*. ??
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                                    ,         ,           ,
                               As good | as heart | can wish:
            ,        ,        ,       ,         ,
      The king | is al|most woun|ded to | the death:
           ,        ,        ,        ,          ,
      And in | the for|tune of | my lord | your son,
              ,       ,          ,           ,           ,
      Prince^Har|ry slain | outright:| and both | the Blunts
         ,     2        ,         ,         T      T     T
      Killed by the | hand of | Douglas.| young Prince John,
            ,    ,              ,          ,          ,
      And West|moreland,| and Staf|ford, fled | the field.
           ,      ,            ,           ,          ,
      And Har|ry Mon|mouth's brawn |(the hulk | Sir John)
          ,    2    ,         ,        ,       ,
      Is pri|soner to | your son:| O such | a day,
             ,         ,          ,         ,      ,
      (So fought,| so fol|lowed, and | so fair|ly won)
            ,          ,        ,     ,         ,
      Came^not | till now | to dig|nify | the times
             ,         ,
      Since^Cae|sar's for|tunes.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
                                 ,         ,        ,
                                How | is this | derived?
       ,              ,       ,                ,    ,
      Saw you | the field?| Came you | from Shrews|bury?
 
LORD BARDOLPH
          ,           ,         ,           ,            ,
      I spake | with one |(my lord)| that came | from thence,
         ,             ,    ,               ,    ,
      A gen|tleman / well bred | and of / good name,
             ,      ,         ,           ,          ,
      That free|ly ren|dered me | these news | for true.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
              ,         ,        ,          ,        ,
      Here* comes | my ser|vant Tra|vers, whom | I sent
           ,        ,        ,       ,       ,
      On Tues|day last,| to lis|ten af|ter news.
 
[Enter TRAVERS]
 
LORD BARDOLPH
           ,      ,       ,         ,        ,
      My lord,| I o|ver-rode | him on | the way,
           ,       ,                 ,  ,        ,
      And he | is fur|nished with / no cer|tainties,
        ,              ,       ,        ,          ,
      More than | he (hap|ly) may | retail | from me.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
            ,                 ,   ,         ,           ,
      Now* Tra|vers, what / good ti|dings comes | from you?
 
TRAVERS
           ,          ,       ,          ,          ,
      My lord,| Sir John | Umfre|vile turned | me back
            ,       ,         ,      2    ,         ,
      With joy|ful ti|dings; and |(being bet|ter horsed)
            ,         ,      ,           ,         ,
      Out-rode | me. Af|ter him,| came spur|ring head
         ,      ,     ,            ,            ,
      A gen|tleman |(almost | forspent | with speed)
              ,       ,            ,            ,         ,
      That stopped | by me,| to breathe | his bloo|died horse.
           ,          ,         ,        ,        ,
      He asked | the way | to Ches|ter: and | of him
         ,        ,           ,            ,    ,
      I did | demand | what news | from Shrews|bury:
           ,     ,     2    ,         T   T    T
      He told | me that re|bellion | had bad luck
                   ,    ,      ,         ,          ,
      And that / young Har|ry Per|cy's spur | was cold.
             ,         ,        ,       ,           ,
      With that | he gave | his a|ble horse | the head,
           ,        ,           ,         ,       ,
      And ben|ding for|wards struck | his a|ble heels
          ,          ,         ,                ,    ,
      Against | the pan|ting sides | of his / poor jade
       ,           ,       ,          ,        ,
      Up to | the ro|wel-head,| and star|ting so,
            ,         ,         ,       ,         ,
      He seemed | in run|ning, to | devour | the way,
        ,           ,        ,
      Staying | no lon|ger ques|tion.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
                                      ,      ,
                                     Ha?| Again:
        ,              ,      ,         ,          ,
      Said he | young Har|ry Per|cy's spur | was cold?
           ,          ,    ,        2    ,
      (Of Hot|spur, Cold|spur?) that re|bellion,
       .   T   T    T
      Had met ill luck?
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                            ,           ,          ,
                       My lord:| I'll tell | you what,
          ,           ,          ,          ,         ,
      If my | young^lord | your son,| have not | the day,
        ,          ,       ,       ,        ,
      Upon | mine ho|nor, for | a sil|ken point
             ,        ,    ,    ,        ,    2
      I'll give | my ba|rony.| Never | talk of it.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
       ,        2       ,    2            ,        ,
      Why should the | gentleman | that rode | by Tra|vers
      <-  ,       T    T   T      ,         ,
        Give || then such in|stances | of loss?
 
LORD BARDOLPH
                                                       ,
                                                Who*, he?
       ,             ,        ,         ,         ,      2->
      He was | some hil|ding fel|low, that | had sto||len
            ,          ,         ,      ,         ,
      The horse | he rode | on: and | upon | my life
        ,           ,          ,           ,            ,
      Speak at | adven|ture. Look,| here comes | more news.
 
[Enter MORTON]
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
       T     T    T       ,     ,            ,        ,
      Yea, this man's | brow, like / to a | title-||leaf,
             ,          ,         2   ,       ,    ,  ->
      Fore|tells the | nature | of a tra|gic vol||ume:
             ,            ,          ,    2    ,  2        ,  ->
      So | looks the | strand where|on the im|perious || flood
               ,       ,          ,     ,
      Hath | left a | witnessed | usur|pation.
            ,         ,            ,            ,    ,
      Say* Mor|ton, didst | thou come | from Shrews|bury?
 
MORTON
         ,            ,    ,         ,       ,
      I ran | from Shrews|bury |(my no|ble lord)
              ,        ,          ,        ,   2     ,
      Where hate|ful death | put on | his ug|liest mask
            ,          ,    2
      To fright | our par|ty.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
                                   ,        ,         ,        ->
                             How doth | my son | and bro||ther?
        ,      ,           2      ,         ,         ,
      Thou | tremblst;| and the white|ness in | thy cheek
          ,    3    3       ,          ,         ,
      Is ap|ter than thy tongue,| to tell | thy er|rand.
      <- ,        ,       ,         ,         ,       ,
         E||ven such | a man,| so faint,| so spi|ritless,
           ,         ,         ,        ,       ,
      So dull,| so dead | in look,| so woe-|begone,
             ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      Drew* Pri|am's cur|tain in | the dead | of night,
            ,            ,           ,          ,           ,
      And would | have told | him, half | his Troy | was burned.
           ,       ,           ,         ,          ,
      But Pri|am found | the fire,| ere he | his tongue:
          ,       ,         ,      ,      2    ,
      And I,| my Per|cy's death,| ere thou re|portst it.
        ,                   ,          ,          ,          ,
      This, thou | wouldst say:| Your son | did thus,| and thus:
            ,          ,          ,          ,       ,      ->
      Your bro|ther, thus.| So fought | the no|ble Doug||las,
        ,      2     ,      ,                   ,    ,
      Stop|ping my gree|dy ear,| with their / bold deeds.
           ,        ,         ,          ,        ,
      But in | the end |(to stop | mine^ear | indeed)
             ,        ,         ,      ,            ,
      Thou hast | a sigh,| to blow | away | this praise,
       ,             ,         ,         ,          ,
      Ending | with Bro|ther, son,| and all | are dead.
 
MORTON
        ,           ,        ,          ,         ,
      Douglas | is li|ving, and | your bro|ther, yet:
       ,             ,          ,
      But for | my lord,| your son.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
                                        ,        ,
                                   Why he | is dead.
       ,            ,        ,        ,         ,
      See what | a rea|dy tongue | suspi|cion hath:
       ,              ,           ,          ,           ,
      He that | but fears | the thing,| he would | not know,
        ,        T   T      T       2     ,          ,
      Hath by | instinct, know|ledge from o|thers' eyes,
             ,          ,           ,            ,      ,
      That what | he feared | is chanced.| Yet speak |(Morton)
        ,               ,         ,    ,        ,
      Tell thou | thy earl,| his di|vina|tion lies,
          ,          ,         ,       ,          ,
      And I | will take | it, as | a sweet | disgrace,
            ,           ,         ,            ,    ,
      And make | thee rich | for do|ing me / such wrong.
 
MORTON
       ,              ,         ,       ,         ,
      You are | too great,| to be |(by me)| gainsaid:
              x         ,      ,            ,          ,
      Your spirit | is too | true, your | fears too | certain.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
           ,          ,         ,          ,         ,
      Yet for | all this,| say not | that Per|cy's dead.
         ,         ,          ,        ,          ,
      I see | a strange | confes|sion in | thine^eye:
              ,           ,           ,          ,        ,
      Thou shakst | thy head | and holdst | it fear | or sin
           ,         ,      ,   2       T     T   T
      To speak | a truth.| If he be | slain, say so:
             ,         ,      ,              ,           ,
      The tongue | offends | not, that | reports | his death:
           ,         ,           ,       ,          ,
      And he | doth sin | that doth | belie | the dead:
           ,           ,          ,        ,       ,
      Not he,| which says | the dead | is not | alive:
                  ,     ,            , ,         ,
      Yet the / first bring|er of / unwel|come news
        ,           ,       ,        ,           ,
      Hath but | a lo|sing of|fice: and | his tongue,
             ,      ,      ,      ,        ,
      Sounds^e|ver af|ter as | a sul|len bell
         ,           ,       ,      ,          ,
      Remem|bered, knol|ling a | depar|ting friend.
 
LORD BARDOLPH
         ,        ,          ,          ,         ,
      I can|not think |(my lord)| your son | is dead.
 
MORTON
       2    ,      ,            ,          ,       ,
      I am sor|ry, I | should force | you to | believe
        ,               ,           x        ,          ,
      That, which | I would | to heaven,| I had | not seen.
            ,            ,     ,             ,       ,
      But these | mine eyes,| saw him | in bloo|dy state,
       ,           ,       ,          ,     2              ,
      Rende|ring faint | quittance |(wearied and | out-breathed)
          ,      ,                  ,     ,            ,
      To Har|ry Mon|mouth; whose^/swift wrath | beat^down
           ,       ,       ,      ,         ,
      The ne|ver-daun|ted Per|cy to | the earth,
              ,            ,        ,       ,            ,
      From whence |(with life)| he ne|ver more | sprung^up.
          ,          ,             ,        ,        ,
      In few;| his death,| (whose spi|rit lent | a fire,
      ,        2     ,        ,        ,         ,
      Even | to the dul|lest pea|sant in | his camp)
        2     ,        ,      T    T   .    T      ,
      Being brui|ted once,| took fire and heat | away
                   ,   ,         ,        ,          ,
      From the / best-tem|pered cou|rage in | his troops.
            ,         ,        ,         ,        ,
      For from | his met|tle, was | his par|ty steeled;
              ,        ,      ,       ,          ,
      Which once,| in him | aba|ted, all | the rest
         ,               ,            ,         ,       ,
      Turned on | themselves,| like dull | and hea|vy lead:
           ,         ,             ,      ,       ,
      And as | the thing,| that's hea|vy in | itself,
        ,        ,           ,            ,         ,
      Upon | enforce|ment, flies | with grea|test speed,
       ,            ,     ,   2      T   T      T
      So did | our men,| heavy in | Hotspur's loss,
        ,               ,            ,          ,            ,
      Lend to | this weight,| such^light|ness with | their fear,
            ,        ,          ,         ,            ,
      That ar|rows fled | not swif|ter toward | their aim,
            ,         ,          ,       ,           ,      ->
      Than did | our sol|diers (ai|ming at | their safe||ty)
       ,        2      ,       ,     2       ,        ,
      Fly | from the field.| Then was the | noble | Worcester
       T    T    T     ,   2        2      ,   2     ,
      Too soon tane | prisoner:| and that fu|rious Scot,
             ,       ,                 ,   ,   2      ,
      (The bloo|dy Doug|las, whose / well-la|boring sword
       .    T     T     T        2   ,         ,         ,
      Had three times slain | the appea|rance of | the king,
             ,         ,        ,          ,           ,
      'Gan vail | his sto|mach and | did grace | the shame
           ,             ,             ,          ,          ,
      Of those | that turned | their backs:| and in | his flight,
        ,              ,          ,         ,        ,
      Stumbling | in fear,| was took.| The sum | of all,
       ,               ,          ,          ,          ,
      Is, that | the king | hath won:| and hath | sent out
          ,       x       2    ,       ,         ,
      A spee|dy power | to encoun|ter you | my lord,
       ,           ,    ,              ,      ,
      Under | the con|duct of | young^Lan|caster
            ,    ,          ,             ,         ,
      And West|moreland.| This is | the news | at full.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
            ,        ,            ,       ,          ,
      For this | I shall | have time | enough | to mourn.
          ,         ,         ,               ,    ,
      In poi|son, there | is phy|sic: and / this news
        ,              ,           ,            ,         ,
      (Having | been well)| that would | have made | me sick,
        2     ,      ,             ,          ,         ,
      Being sick,| have in | some^mea|sure, made | me well.
           ,          ,            ,      ,           ,
      And as | the wretch,| whose fe|ver-wea|kened joints,
                ,          ,         ,      ,       ,
      Like* strength|less hin|ges, buck|le un|der life,
         ,        ,        ,       ,             ,
      Impa|tient of | his fit,| breaks like^|a fire
       ,            ,          ,      2   ,        ,
      Out of | his kee|per's arms:| even so,| my limbs
        ,                ,       2    ,        ,            ,
      (Weakened | with grief)| being now | enraged | with grief,
             ,            ,       ,     ,                       ,
      Are thrice | themselves.| Hence there/fore thou | nice^crutch.
         ,       ,        ,            ,          ,
      A sca|ly gaunt|let now | with joints | of steel
             ,            ,          ,            ,       ,
      Must glove | this hand.| And hence | thou sick|ly quoif,
            ,        ,          ,       ,          ,
      Thou art | a guard | too wan|ton for | the head,
              ,          ,            ,    T     T   .  T
      Which prin|ces, fleshed | with con|quest, aim to hit.
             ,         ,          ,       ,        ,
      Now* bind | my brows | with i|ron, and | approach
           ,          ,           ,     .    T     T    T
      The rag|gedst hour,| that time | and spite dare bring
           ,       ,       2    ,          ,       ,
      To frown | upon | the enraged | Northum|berland.
              x            ,          ,         ,          ,
      Let* heaven | kiss^earth:| now let | not Na|ture's hand
        T   .    T    T          ,          ,      ,
      Keep the wild flood | confined:| let or|der die,
           ,           ,         ,       ,       ,
      And let | this world | no lon|ger be | a stage
           ,        ,        ,      ,    2     ,
      To feed | conten|tion in | a lin|gering act:
           ,     ,     x                T     T    T
      But let | one spirit / of the | first-born Cain
        ,             ,                ,    ,       2    ,
      Reign in | all bo|soms, that / each heart | being set
           ,       ,               ,    ,          ,
      On bloo|dy cour|ses, the / rude scene | may end,
            ,        ,        ,  2    ,         ,
      And dark|ness be | the bu|rier of | the dead.
 
TRAVERS
             ,        ,         ,          ,          ,
      This strai|ned pas|sion doth | you wrong,| my lord.
 
LORD BARDOLPH
              ,        ,      ,   ,          2        ,
      Sweet^earl,| divorce | not wis/dom from your | honor.
 
MORTON
            ,         ,          ,       ,      ,
      The lives | of all | your lo|ving com|plices
        ,               ,           ,         ,          ,
      Lean on | your health,| the which | if you | give^ore
           ,      ,          ,         ,        ,
      To stor|my pas|sion, must | perforce | decay.
            ,       2   ,        ,        ,       ,
      You cast | the event | of war |(my no|ble lord)
             ,        2    ,           ,         ,          ,
      And summed | the account | of chance,| before | you said
       ,         T    T    T      2      ,       ,
      Let us | make head: It | was your pre|surmise,
        ,             ,         ,           ,            ,
      That in | the dole | of blows,| your son | might^drop:
            ,          ,          ,        ,        ,
      You knew | he walked | ore pe|rils, on | an edge
             ,            ,   ,              ,   ,
      More like|ly to / fall in,| than to / get ore:
       ,             ,           ,          ,    ,
      You were | advised | his flesh | was ca|pable
            ,           ,           ,         ,          x
      Of wounds,| and scars;| and that | his for|ward spirit
              ,           ,       T    T    .  T         ,
      Would lift | him, where | most trade of dan|ger ranged,
           ,         ,         ,           ,         ,
      Yet did | you say | go forth:| and none | of this
                 ,       ,     ,         ,          ,
      (Though strong|ly ap|prehen|ded) could | restrain
       .    T     T    T         ,           ,         x
      The stiff-borne ac|tion: what | hath then | befallen?
           ,        2       ,     ,      T      T      T
      Or what | hath this bold | enter|prise brought forth,
        ,               ,        ,           ,        ,
      More than | that be|ing, which | was like | to be?
 
LORD BARDOLPH
          ,          ,       ,      ,          ,
      We all | that are | enga|ged to | this loss,
        ,             ,               ,   ,           ,
      Knew that | we ven|tured on / such dan|gerous seas,
            ,         ,            ,           ,        ,
      That if | we wrought | our life,| 'twas ten | to one:
           ,        ,         ,          ,         ,
      And yet | we ven|tured for | the gain | proposed,
         ,             ,          ,      ,        ,
      Choked the | respect | of like|ly pe|ril feared,
            ,               ,  ,     ,           ,
      And since | we are / oreset,| venture | again.
        ,     2        T   T    T      ,           ,
      Come, we will | all put forth,| body,| and goods.
 
MORTON
             ,           ,     ,              ,       ,
      'Tis more | than time:| and (my | most^no|ble lord)
          ,         ,         ,         ,           ,
      I hear | for cer|tain, and | do speak | the truth:
           ,        ,    ,           ,        ,
      The gen|tle Arch|bishop | of York | is up
             ,       ,         x         ,      ,
      With well-|appoin|ted powers:| he is | a man
       ,      2     ,         ,        ,          ,   2
      Who with a | double | surety | binds his | followers.
           ,          ,         ,     ,           ,
      My lord | your son | had on|ly but | the corpse,
           ,         ,          ,         ,         ,
      But sha|dows, and | the shows | of men | to fight.
                   ,    ,       ,         ,        ,
      For that / same word |(rebel|lion) did | divide
           ,       ,          ,         ,            ,
      The ac|tion of | their bo|dies, from | their souls,
       ,               ,            ,      ,           ,
      And they | did fight | with quea|siness,| constrained
          ,      ,    ,                      ,        ,    ->
      As men | drink po/tions; that | their wea|pons on||ly
         ,       2      ,     ,                 x            ,
      Seemed | on our side:| but for | their spirits | and souls,
             ,       ,         ,         ,           ,
      This word |(rebel|lion) it | had froze | them up,
           ,         ,       ,         ,          ,     ->
      As fish | are in | a pond.| But now | the bish||op
        ,      ,     ,         ,     ,
      Turns | insur|rection | to re|ligion:
           ,          ,         ,     ,           ,
      Supposed | sincere | and ho|ly in | his thoughts,
            ,          ,          ,      ,           ,
      He's fol|lowed both | with bo|dy, and | with mind:
            ,        ,          ,         ,          ,
      And doth | enlarge | his ri|sing, with | the blood
       .   T    T   T           ,            ,          ,
      Of^fair King Ri|chard, scraped | from Pom|fret stones;
          ,             x           ,        ,          ,
      Derives | from heaven,| his quar|rel, and | his cause:
        ,               ,         ,         ,         ,
      Tells them | he doth | bestride | a blee|ding land,
       ,              ,              ,    ,       ,
      Gasping | for life,| under / great Bo|lingbroke,
            ,          ,         ,         ,       ,
      And more,| and less,| do flock | to fol|low him.
 
NORTHUMBERLAND
          ,         ,        ,     T   .   T     T
      I knew | of this | before.| But to speak truth,
            ,         ,           ,          ,         ,
      This pre|sent grief | had wiped | it from | my mind.
          ,         ,         ,      ,       ,
      Go in | with me,| and coun|sel e|very man
           ,       ,          ,       ,        ,
      The ap|test way | for safe|ty, and | revenge:
            ,          ,                ,     ,             ,
      Get posts,| and let|ters, and / make friends | with speed,
       ,   2      ,          ,       T    T    T
      Never so | few, and | never | yet more need.
 
[Exeunt]

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