Prescanned Shakespeare.com
presented by Acoustic Learning


Twelfth Night

Act V, Scene 1

Before OLIVIA's house.
 
[Enter Clown and FABIAN]
 
FABIAN
Now, as thou lovest me, let me see his letter.
 
CLOWN
Good Master Fabian, grant me another request.
 
FABIAN
Any thing.
 
CLOWN
Do not desire to see this letter.
 
FABIAN
This is, to give a dog, and in recompense desire my dog again.
 
[Enter DUKE ORSINO, VIOLA, CURIO, and Lords]
 
DUKE ORSINO
Belong you to the Lady Olivia, friends?
 
CLOWN
Ay, sir; we are some of her trappings.
 
DUKE ORSINO
I know thee well; how dost thou, my good fellow?
 
CLOWN
Truly, sir, the better for my foes and the worse for my friends.
 
DUKE ORSINO
Just the contrary; the better for thy friends.
 
CLOWN
No, sir, the worse.
 
DUKE ORSINO
How can that be?
 
CLOWN
Marry, sir, they praise me and make an ass of me; now my foes tell me plainly I am an ass: so that by my foes, sir I profit in the knowledge of myself, and by my friends, I am abused: so that, conclusions to be as kisses, if your four negatives make your two affirmatives why then, the worse for my friends and the better for my foes.
 
DUKE ORSINO
Why, this is excellent.
 
CLOWN
By my troth, sir, no; though it please you to be one of my friends.
 
DUKE ORSINO
Thou shalt not be the worse for me: there's gold.
 
CLOWN
But that it would be double-dealing, sir, I would you could make it another.
 
DUKE ORSINO
O, you give me ill counsel.
 
CLOWN
Put your grace in your pocket, sir, for this once, and let your flesh and blood obey it.
 
DUKE ORSINO
Well, I will be so much a sinner, to be a double-dealer: there's another.
 
CLOWN
Primo, secundo, tertio, is a good play; and the old saying is, the third pays for all: the triplex, sir, is a good tripping measure; or the bells of Saint Bennet, sir, may put you in mind; one, two, three.
 
DUKE ORSINO
You can fool no more money out of me at this throw: if you will let your lady know I am here to speak with her, and bring her along with you, it may awake my bounty further.
 
CLOWN
Marry, sir, lullaby to your bounty till I come again. I go, sir; but I would not have you to think that my desire of having is the sin of covetousness: but, as you say, sir, let your bounty take a nap, I will awake it anon.
 
[Exit]
 
VIOLA
             ,          ,           ,         ,       ,
1     Here comes | the man | sir, that | did res|cue me.
 
[Enter ANTONIO and Officers]
 
DUKE ORSINO
             ,        ,       ,      ,        ,
      That face | of his | I do | remem|ber well;
            ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      Yet when | I saw | it last,| it was | besmeared
           ,         ,       ,         ,         ,
      As black | as Vul|can in | the smoke | of war:
         ,         ,       ,        ,        ,
      A baw|bling ves|sel was | he cap|tain of,
            ,         ,            ,       ,     ,
      For shal|low draught | and bulk | unpri|zable;
             ,            ,         ,       ,         ,
      With which | such scath|ful grap|ple did | he make
                   ,   ,      ,       ,         ,
      With the / most no|ble bot|tom of | our fleet,
            ,     ,     ,           ,          ,
      That ve|ry en|vy and | the tongue | of loss
        T     T   .   T      ,          ,             x
10    Cried fame and hon|or on | him. What's | the matter?
 
FIRST OFFICER
         ,       ,         ,       ,   ,
      Orsi|no, this | is that | Anto|nio
             ,          ,   ,     2         ,            ,
      That took | the Phoe|nix and her | fraught from | Candy,
            ,        ,         ,         ,       ,
      And this | is he | that did | the Ti|ger board,
                    ,    ,       ,       ,         ,
      When your / young ne|phew Ti|tus lost | his leg:
        ,    2         ,      ,                ,           ,
      Here in the | streets, des/perate | of shame | and state,
          ,        ,        ,        ,     ,         2->
      In pri|vate brab|ble did | we ap|prehend || him.
 
VIOLA
          ,         ,        ,      ,            ,
      He did | me kind|ness sir,| drew on | my side,
       ,    2     ,               ,         ,      ,
      But in con|clusion | put strange | speech u|pon me,
          ,     T    T     T     ,        ,
      I know | not what 'twas | but dis|traction.
 
DUKE ORSINO
       ,        ,                ,   ,       ,
20    Nota|ble pi|rate, thou / salt-wa|ter thief,
            ,         ,          ,        ,    2         ,
      What foo|lish bold|ness brought | thee to their | mercies,
             ,         ,          ,      ,         ,
      Whom thou | in terms | so blood|y and | so dear,
             ,           ,   3   3
      Hast made | thine^en|emies?
 
ANTONIO
                                     ,      ,       ,
                                  Orsi|no, no|ble sir,
            ,          2    ,      ,            ,           ,
      Be pleased | that I shake | off these | names you | give me:
         ,  2   ,      ,          ,         ,       ->
      Anto|nio ne|ver yet | was thief | or pi||rate,
         ,      2     ,         ,           ,        ,
      Though | I confess,| on base | and ground | enough,
         ,       ,   ,   .   T    T     T        ,      2->
      Orsi|no's en|emy.| A witchcraft drew | me hi|ther:    ????
             ,        ,        ,      ,              ,
      That most | ingrate|ful boy | there by | your side,
                   ,    ,         ,          ,       ,
30    From the / rude sea's | enraged | and foa|my mouth
          ,       ,        ,            ,        ,
      Did I | redeem;| a wreck | past^hope | he was:
            ,        ,         ,          ,       ,
      His life | I gave | him and | did there|to add
           ,         ,       ,         ,        ,
      My love | without | reten|tion, or | restraint,
           ,        ,    ,              ,    ,
      All his | in ded|ica|tion. For / his sake,
          ,       ,        ,      ,              ,
      Did I | expose | myself |(pure for | his love)
       ,          ,       ,         ,         ,
      Into | the dan|ger of | this ad|verse town,
        ,           ,          ,        ,       ,
      Drew to | defend | him when | he was | beset:
        ,     2      ,     ,             ,      ,
      Where being | appre|hended,| his false | cunning
        ,   ,         2      ,          ,       ,
      (Not mea/ning to par|take with | me in | danger)
        ,       2       ,        ,        ,       ,
40    Taught him to | face me | out of | his ac|quaintance,
            ,        ,       ,        ,       ,
      And grew | a twen|ty years | remov|ed thing
             ,            ,        ,         ,          ,
      While one | would wink:| denied | me mine | own purse,
            ,        ,     ,       ,        ,
      Which I | had re|commen|ded to | his use
            ,         ,        ,
      Not half | an hour | before.  \\
 
VIOLA
       ,              ,
      How can | this be?
 
DUKE ORSINO
                                ,        ,          ,
                         When came | he to | this town?
 
ANTONIO
         ,         ,                ,      ,         ,
      Today,| my lord;| and for / three months | before,
          ,     ,      2   ,         ,     ,
      No in|terim,| not a min|ute's va|cancy,
            ,          ,                ,   ,     ,
      Both day | and night | did we / keep com|pany.
 
[Enter OLIVIA and Attendants]
 
DUKE ORSINO
             ,        2      ,         ,        ,          ,
50    Here comes | the countess:| now hea|ven walks | on earth.
         2      ,     ,        ,    2        ,          ,
      But for thee | fellow,| fellow thy | words are | madness:
               ,            ,           ,         ,   ,
      Three months | this youth | hath ten|ded u/pon me;
            ,         ,       ,     ,           ,
      But more | of that | anon.| Take him | aside.
 
OLIVIA
             ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
      What would | my lord,| but that | he may | not have,
            ,     ,  2   ,          ,    2   ,
      Wherein | Oli|via may | seem ser|viceable?
         ,  2    ,        ,           ,     2      ,
      Cesa|rio, you | do not | keep prom|ise with me.
 
VIOLA
       ,
      Madam:
 
DUKE ORSINO
                 ,          ,  2
               Gracious | Oli|via.
 
OLIVIA
                                   ,             ,
                                  What do | you say,
         ,   ,     ,        __    oo
60    Cesa|rio?| Good my | lord.|
 
VIOLA
           ,            ,         ,      ,      ,
      My lord | would speak;| my du|ty hush|es me.
 
OLIVIA
          ,        ,               ,    ,         ,
      If it | be aught | to the / old tune | my lord,
          ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      It is | as fat | and ful|some to | mine^ear
          ,        ,      ,      o   oo
      As how|ling af|ter mu|sic.   |
 
DUKE ORSINO
        ,         ,
      Still so | cruel?
 
OLIVIA
                          ,         ,          __
                        Still so | constant,| lord.
 
DUKE ORSINO
        ,    2      ,          ,      ,       ,
      What to per|verseness?| You un|civil | lady,
       .   T    T  T          ,    ,         ,      2->
      To whose ingrate | and un|auspi|cious al||tars
           ,          ,           ,    2               ,     ,
      My soul | the faith|fullst of|ferings hath / breathed out
            ,       ,       ,           ,         2   ,
70    That ere | devo|tion ten|dered. What | shall I do?
 
OLIVIA
      ,          2      ,          ,      ,       2     ,
      Even | what it please | my lord,| that shall be|come him.
 
DUKE ORSINO
             ,        ,        ,         ,          x
      Why should | I not |(had I | the heart | to do it)
        ,    2         ,         ,          ,          ,
      Like to the | Egyp|tian thief | at point | of death,
        ,             ,       ,       ,      ,
      Kill what | I love:|(a sav|age jea|lousy
             ,         ,       ,     2      ,         ,
      That some|times sa|vors no|bly) but hear | me this:
             ,        ,      ,          ,         ,
      Since you | to non-|regar|dance cast | my faith,
            ,        ,       ,         ,       ,
      And that | I part|ly know | the in|strument
              ,          ,         ,      ,     2        ,
      That screws | me from | my true | place in your | favor,
        ,             ,        ,        ,        ,
      Live you | the mar|ble-breas|ted ty|rant still;
            ,          ,         ,        ,          ,
80    But this | your min|ion, whom | I know | you love,
            ,        ,     2    ,        ,        ,      ->
      And whom,| by hea|ven I swear,| I ten|der dear||ly,
       ,        2    ,     ,             ,      ,
      Him | will I tear | out of | that cru|el eye,
                   ,     ,      ,        ,          ,
      Where he / sits crown|ed in | his mas|ter's spite.
        ,   ,                     ,            ,        ,
      Come boy / with me;| my thoughts | are ripe | in mis|chief:  ????
            ,      ,          ,         ,        ,
      I'll sac|rifice | the lamb | that I | do love,
           ,        ,         ,         ,        ,
      To spite | a ra|ven's heart | within | a dove.
 
VIOLA
          ,         ,        ,         ,       ,
      And I | most jo|cund, apt,| and wil|lingly,
          ,         ,        ,          ,            ,
      To do | you rest,| a thou|sand deaths | would die.
 
OLIVIA
              ,       ,  2
      Where goes | Cesa|rio?
 
VIOLA
                             ,      ,        ,
90                          Af|ter him | I love
        ,             ,            ,      ,              ,
      More than | I love | these^eyes,| more than | my life,
        ,             ,           ,                ,    ,
      More by | all mores,| than ere | I shall / love wife.
         ,        ,          ,      ,       ,
      If I | do feign,| you wit|nesses | above
       ,            ,          ,        ,        ,
      Punish | my life | for tain|ting of | my love.
 
OLIVIA
           ,      ,        ,       ,        ,
      Aye me | detes|ted, how | am I | beguiled?
 
VIOLA
       ,             ,           ,          ,         ,
      Who does | beguile | you? Who | does do | you wrong?
 
OLIVIA
             ,        ,         ,     ,           ,
      Hast thou | forgot | thyself?| Is it | so long?
             ,          ,     ,
      Call forth | the ho|ly fa|ther.
 
DUKE ORSINO
                                       ,       ,
                                     Come,| away.
 
OLIVIA
       ,             ,       ,  2    ,          ,
100   Whither | my lord?| Cesa|rio, hus|band, stay.
 
DUKE ORSINO
       ,
      Husband?
 
OLIVIA
                    ,         ,         ,       ,
               Aye hus|band: can | he that | deny?
 
DUKE ORSINO
           ,         ,
      Her hus|band, sir|rah?
 
VIOLA
                             ,        ,        ,
                            No | my lord,| not I.
 
OLIVIA
         ,       ,         ,        ,         ,
      Alas,| it is | the base|ness of | thy fear
             ,            ,        ,         ,   ,
      That makes | thee stran|gle thy | propri|ety:
            ,       ,  2     ,         ,         ,
      Fear not | Cesa|rio; take | thy for|tunes up;
       ,                ,           ,          ,          ,
      Be that | thou knowst | thou art,| and then | thou art
           ,          ,            ,
      As great | as that | thou fearst.
 
[Enter Priest]
                                           ,        ,       ->
110                                     O wel|come fa||ther:
       ,      2     ,           ,        ,     ,
      Fa|ther, I charge | thee by | thy rev|erence
        ,    2     ,              ,       ,     ,
      Here to un|fold, though | lately | we in|tended
           ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      To keep | in dark|ness what | occa|sion now
          ,         ,           ,           ,           ,
      Reveals | before | 'tis ripe,| what thou | dost know
            ,        ,         ,            ,          ,
      Hath new|ly passed | between | this youth | and me.
 
PRIEST
         ,         ,      ,       ,         ,
      A con|tract of | eter|nal bond | of love,
            ,         ,   2    ,       ,          ,
      Confirmed | by mu|tual join|der of | your hands,
         ,       ,        ,      ,          ,
      Attes|ted by | the ho|ly close | of lips,
          ,              ,       ,         ,          ,
      Strengthened | by in|terchange|ment of | your rings;
           ,         ,    ,      2        ,   ,
120   And all | the cer|emo|ny of this / compact
         ,     2       ,         ,       ,     ,
      Sealed in my | function,| by my | testi|mony:
              ,         ,            ,           ,          ,
      Since when,| my watch | hath told | me, toward | my grave
      ,          ,          T   T    T     oo
      I have | travelled | but two hours.|
 
DUKE ORSINO
          ,        ,         ,           ,          ,
      O thou | dissem|bling cub:| what wilt | thou be
             ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      When time | hath sowed | a griz|zle on | thy case?
           ,          ,          ,          ,        ,
      Or will | not else | thy craft | so quick|ly grow,
             ,           ,           ,         ,      ,
      That thine | own trip | shall be | thine^o|verthrow?
            ,          ,          ,        ,          ,
      Farewell,| and take | her; but | direct | thy feet
              ,        ,          ,          ,       ,
      Where thou | and I | henceforth | may nev|er meet.
 
VIOLA
           ,       ,        ,
130   My lord,| I do | protest.
 
OLIVIA
                                  ,         ,
                               O do | not swear,
            ,        ,              ,          ,           ,
      Hold lit|tle faith,| though thou | hast too | much fear.
 
[Enter SIR ANDREW]
 
SIR ANDREW
For the love of God, a surgeon! Send one presently to Sir Toby.
 
OLIVIA
What's the matter?
 
SIR ANDREW
He has broke my head across and has given Sir Toby a bloody coxcomb too: for the love of God, your help! I had rather than forty pound I were at home.
 
OLIVIA
Who has done this, Sir Andrew?
 
SIR ANDREW
The count's gentleman, one Cesario: we took him for a coward, but he's the very devil incardinate.
 
DUKE ORSINO
My gentleman, Cesario?
 
SIR ANDREW
'Od's lifelings, here he is! You broke my head for nothing; and that that I did, I was set on to do it by Sir Toby.
 
VIOLA
       ,             ,         ,   ,   2       ,
133   Why do | you speak | to me?| I never | hurt you:
            ,           ,        ,            ,    ,
      You drew | your sword | upon | me with/out cause;
          ,       ,           ,          ,         ,
      But I | bespoke | you fair,| and hurt | you not.
 
SIR ANDREW
If a bloody coxcomb be a hurt, you have hurt me: I think you set nothing by a bloody coxcomb. Here comes Sir Toby halting; you shall hear more: but if he had not been in drink, he would have tickled you othergates than he did.
 
DUKE ORSINO
How now, gentleman! how is it with you?
 
SIR TOBY BELCH
That's all one: has hurt me, and there's the end on it. Sot, didst see Dick surgeon, sot?
 
CLOWN
O, he's drunk, Sir Toby, an hour agone; his eyes were set at eight in the morning.
 
SIR TOBY BELCH
Then he's a rogue, and a passy measures panyn: I hate a drunken rogue.
 
OLIVIA
Away with him! Who hath made this havoc with them?
 
SIR ANDREW
I'll help you, Sir Toby, because well be dressed together.
 
SIR TOBY BELCH
Will you help? an ass-head and a coxcomb and a knave, a thin-faced knave, a gull!
 
OLIVIA
Get him to bed, and let his hurt be looked to.
 
[Exeunt Clown, FABIAN, SIR TOBY BELCH, and SIR ANDREW; Enter SEBASTIAN]
 
SEBASTIAN
       2    ,      ,    3 3       ,          ,
136   I am sor|ry ma|dam I have hurt | your kin|sman:
      <- ,      ,         ,         ,          2     ,
        But || had it | been the | brother | of my blood,
      <-    ,            ,         ,          ,          ,     o
        I must || have done | no less | with wit | and safe|ty.
            ,          ,          ,       ,      2     ,        2->
      You throw | a strange | regard | upon | me, and by || that
         ,        ,          ,       ,       ,
140   I do | perceive | it hath | offen|ded you:
       ,             ,      ,   ,                 ,
      Pardon | me (sweet | one) e/ven for | the vows
           ,         ,       ,         ,      ,
      We made | each o|ther but | so late | ago.
 
DUKE ORSINO
            ,          ,          ,             ,   ,        o ->
      One face,| one voice,| one ha|bit, and / two per||sons,
         ,   3  3     ,       2      ,      2    ,
      A na|tural perspec|tive, that is,| and is not.
 
SEBASTIAN
         ,  2   ,        ,       ,   ,
      Anto|nio, O | my dear | Anto|nio,
       ,              ,        ,          ,         ,
      How have | the hou|rs racked | and tor|tured me,
        ,              ,      ,
      Since I | have lost | thee?
 
ANTONIO
                                     ,  2      ,
                                 Se|bastian | are you?
 
SEBASTIAN
         ,            ,      ,  2
      Fearst thou | that An|tonio?  (pickup)
 
ANTONIO
       ,               ,       ,       ,         ,
150   How have | you made | divi|sion of | yourself?
          ,       ,         ,        ,           ,
      An ap|ple cleft | in two,| is not | more twin
             ,      T    T   T       ,     2    ,   2
      Than these | two creatures.| Which is Se|bastian?
 
OLIVIA
        ,   ,
      Most won/derful.  (picked up)
 
SEBASTIAN
         ,           ,        ,      ,       ,        ->
      Do I | stand^there?| I ne|ver had | a bro||ther;
       ,       2       ,         ,  2   ,       ,      2->
      Nor | can there be | that de|ity in | my na||ture
           ,         ,  2    ,        ,       ,       ->
      Of here | and ev|ery where.| I had | a sis||ter,
          2        ,     ,          ,        ,         ,
      Whom the / blind waves | and sur|ges have | devoured.
           ,    ,         ,         ,        ,
      Of char|ity,| what kin | are you | to me?
             ,      ,           ,          ,      ,
      What coun|tryman?| What name?| What par|entage?
 
VIOLA
          ,      ,       ,    2   ,        ,       ->
160   Of Mes|saline:| Sebas|tian was | my fa||ther;
        ,         ,    2   ,        ,        ,
      Such | a Sebas|tian was | my bro|ther too,
           ,         ,      ,        ,   2    ,
      So went | he suit|ed to | his wat|ery tomb:
           ,       ,        ,           ,          ,
      If spir|its can | assume | both form | and suit
            ,             x
      You come | to fright us.
 
SEBASTIAN
                                     ,    2   ,       ,
                                 A spir|it I am | indeed;
           ,        ,       ,         ,        ,
      But am | in that | dimen|sion gross|ly clad
              ,          ,       ,        ,     ,
      Which from | the womb | I did | parti|cipate.
        ,     2     ,       ,         ,         ,
      Were you a | woman,| as the | rest goes | even,
           ,          ,           ,       ,          ,
      I should | my tears | let fall | upon | your cheek,
         2       ,     ,           ,       ,
170   And say Thrice-|welcome | drowned Vi|ola.
 
VIOLA
          ,       ,        ,       ,         ,
      My fa|ther had | a mole | upon | his brow.
 
SEBASTIAN
           ,         ,
      And so | had mine.  (pickup)
 
VIOLA
            ,          ,        2  ,      ,          ,
      And died | that day | when Vio|la from | her birth
           ,          ,         ,
      Had num|bered thir|teen years.  (picked up)
 
SEBASTIAN
      ,         ,            ,      ,        ,
      O that | record | is live|ly in | my soul,
          ,       2    ,         ,       ,
      He fin|ished indeed | his mor|tal act
      <-      ,            ,        ,        ,         ,     oo
        That day || that made | my sis|ter thir|teen years.|
 
VIOLA
          ,         ,         ,        ,       ,
      If no|thing lets | to make | us hap|py both
            ,        ,      ,        ,         ,
      But this | my mas|culine | usurped | attire,
          ,        ,          ,          ,        ,
180   Do not | embrace | me till | each cir|cumstance
           ,      ,    ,                 ,          ,
      Of place, time, for/tune, do | cohere | and jump
           ,    ,    ,       ,             ,
      That I | am Vi|ola:| which to | confirm,
             ,          ,      ,        ,          ,
      I'll bring | you to | a cap|tain in | this town,
             ,        ,        ,       2       ,        ,
      Where lie | my mai|den weeds;| by whose gen|tle help
         ,          ,          ,           ,       ,
      I was | preserved | to serve | this no|ble count.
       ,           ,         ,       ,         ,
      All the | occur|rence of | my for|tune since
             ,        ,           ,     ,           ,
      Hath been | between | this la|dy and | this lord.
 
SEBASTIAN
           ,         ,      ,           ,         ,
      So comes | it la|dy, you | have been | mistook:
           ,       ,        ,      ,         ,
      But na|ture to | her bi|as drew | in that.
            ,            ,         ,       ,       ,
190   You would | have been | contrac|ted to | a maid;
           ,          ,        ,        ,         ,
      Nor are | you there|in (by | my life)| deceived,
           ,        ,        ,      2    ,         ,
      You are | betroth|ed both | to a maid | and man.
 
DUKE ORSINO
          ,        ,      ,    ,                ,
      Be not | amazed,| right no/ble is | his blood.
           ,        ,       ,          ,             ,
      If this | be so,| as yet | the glass | seems true,
                  ,    ,                 ,   ,       ,
      I shall / have share | in this / most hap|py wreck.
       ,                 ,        ,       ,         ,
      Boy, thou | hast said | to me | a thou|sand times
            ,         ,            ,       ,        ,
      Thou nev|er shouldst | love^wo|man like | to me.
 
VIOLA
           ,           ,         ,      ,      ,
      And all | those say|ings will | I o|verswear;
       T    T     T          ,         ,         ,
      And those swear|ings keep | as true | in soul
           ,          ,      ,      ,          ,
200   As doth | that orb|ed con|tinent | the fire
            ,       ,           ,
      That se|vers day | from night.
 
DUKE ORSINO
                                      ,             ,
                                    Give me | thy hand;
           ,        ,          ,        ,         ,
      And let | me see | thee in | thy wo|man's weeds.
 
VIOLA
           ,         ,          ,          ,          ,
      The cap|tain that | did bring | me first | on shore
        ,         ,     ,                 ,         ,      2->
      Hath my | maid's gar/ments: he | upon | some ac||tion
          ,        ,         ,       ,   2     ,
      Is now | in du|rance, at | Malvo|lio's suit,
         ,      ,         ,    2    ,       ,      2->
      A gen|tleman,| and fol|lower of | my la||dy's.
 
OLIVIA
       ,      2     ,           ,        , 2     ,
      He shall en|large him:| fetch Mal|volio | hither:
           ,       ,    ,         ,       ,
      And yet | alas,| now I | remem|ber me,
            ,          ,      ,           ,         ,
210   They say | poor gen|tleman,| he's much | distract.
 
[Re-enter Clown with a letter, and FABIAN]
          ,        ,         ,      ,         ,
      A most | extrac|ting fren|zy of | mine^own
            ,      ,           ,       ,         ,
      From my | remem|brance clear|ly ban|ished his.
            ,        ,
      How does | he sir|rah?    \\
 
CLOWN
Truly, madam, he holds Belzebub at the staves's end as well as a man in his case may do: has here writ a letter to you; I should have given't you to-day morning, but as a madman's epistles are no gospels, so it skills not much when they are delivered.
 
OLIVIA
Open it, and read it.
 
CLOWN
Look then to be well edified when the fool delivers the madman. [Reads] By the Lord, madam.
 
OLIVIA
How now, art thou mad?
 
CLOWN
No, madam, I do but read madness: an your ladyship will have it as it ought to be, you must allow Vox.
 
OLIVIA
Prithee, read in thy right wits.
 
CLOWN
So I do, madonna; but to read his right wits is to read thus: therefore perpend, my princess, and give ear.
 
OLIVIA
Read it you, sirrah.
 
FABIAN
[Reads] By the Lord, madam, you wrong me, and the world shall know it: though you have put me into darkness and given your drunken cousin rule over me, yet have I the benefit of my senses as well as your ladyship. I have your own letter that induced me to the semblance I put on; with the which I doubt not but to do myself much right, or you much shame. Think of me as you please. I leave my duty a little unthought of and speak out of my injury. The Madly-Used Malvolio.
 
OLIVIA
Did he write this?
 
CLOWN
Ay madam.
 
DUKE ORSINO
            ,       ,      ,            ,        o
214   This sa|vors not | much of | distrac|tion.
 
OLIVIA
       ,     2    ,         , 2       ,          ,
      See him de|livered | Fabian;| bring him | hither.
 
[Exit FABIAN]
           ,          ,         2         ,      ,           ,
      My lord,| so please | you, these things | further | thought on,
           ,       2     ,       ,       ,       ,
      To think | me as well | a sis|ter as | a wife,
       ,     2          ,      2    ,         x           ,
      One day shall | crown the al|liance | on it, so | please you,
        ,            ,          ,       ,        ,
      Here at | my house | and at | my pro|per cost.
 
DUKE ORSINO
       ,       2     ,     ,    2     ,           ,
220   Madam,| I am most | apt to em|brace your | offer.
 
[To VIOLA]
            ,        ,           ,       2      ,         ,
      Your mas|ter quits | you; and | for your ser|vice done || him,
       ,     ,       ,          ,         2      ,
      So | much a|gainst the | mettle | of your sex,
          ,        ,            ,         ,        ,       2->
      So far | beneath | your soft | and ten|der breed||ing,
            ,            ,         ,             ,   ,
      And since | you called | me mas|ter for / so long,
        ,            ,          ,            ,          ,
      Here is | my hand:| you shall | from this | time be
            ,         ,        2
      Your mas|ter's mis|tress.
 
OLIVIA
                                   ,        ,         ,
                                A sis|ter, you | are she.
 
[Re-enter FABIAN, with MALVOLIO]
 
DUKE ORSINO
           ,         ,
      Is this | the mad|man?
 
OLIVIA
                              ,         ,           ,
                             Aye | my lord,| this same:
           ,        ,  2
230   How now,| Malvo|lio?
 
MALVOLIO
                           ,    3    3       ,         ,
                          Ma|dam, you have done | me wrong,
         ,   2     ,
      Noto|rious wrong.
 
OLIVIA
                         ,          ,  2    ,
                       Have I | Malvo|lio? No.
 
MALVOLIO
       ,  2        ,     ,             ,          ,
      Lady you | have, pray / you pe|ruse that | letter.
            ,         ,       ,       ,          ,
      You must | not now | deny | it is | your hand:
        ,              ,        ,         ,          ,
      Write from | it if | you can,| in hand,| or phrase,
          ,          ,           ,          ,       ,        ->
      Or say | 'tis not | your seal,| nor your | inven||tion:
       ,         ,      ,    2              ,          ,
      You | can say | none of this:| well grant | it then
            ,        ,        ,    ,        ,      ->
      And tell | me in | the mo|desty | of hon||or,
       ,       2       x                 ,      ,         ,     ->
240   Why | you have given | me such / clear lights | of fa||vor,
        ,      2      ,      2      ,     ,          ,
      Bade | me come smi|ling and cross-|gartered | to you,
          ,        ,        ,         ,         ,
      To put | on yel|low stock|ings and | to frown
         ,        ,     ,          ,       ,       ->
      Upon | Sir To|by and | the ligh|ter peo||ple;
       ,     ,         ,    2       ,   2     ,
      And | acting | this in an | obe|dient hope,
       ,      2       ,          ,       ,      ,
      Why have you | suffered | me to | be im|prisoned,
        ,    2      T    T     T    2   ,         ,
      Kept in a | dark house, vis|ited by | the priest,
            ,          ,       ,    2    ,          ,
      And made | the most | notor|ious geck | and gull
            ,       ,          ,           ,        ,
      That ere | inven|tion played | on? Tell | me why.
 
OLIVIA
         ,       ,  2     ,        ,        ,        ->
      Alas | Malvo|lio, this | is not | my wri||ting,
         ,      2     ,           ,          ,     ,
250   Though | I confess | much like | the char|acter
           ,         ,         ,       ,       ,
      But out | of ques|tion 'tis | Mari|a's hand.
           ,       ,       ,          ,        ,
      And now | I do | bethink | me, it | was she
              ,         ,          ,           ,         ,       2->
      First^told | me thou | wast mad;| then camst | in smi||ling,
           ,          ,             ,          ,       ,
      And in | such forms | which here | were pre|supposed
         ,     ,    2       ,        ,          2     ,
      Upon | thee in the | letter.| Prithee,| be content:
             ,      2       ,       ,          ,      ,
      This prac|tise hath most | shrewdly | passed u|pon thee;
            ,         ,           ,           ,         x
      But when | we know | the grounds | and au|thors of it,
             ,          ,          ,         ,          ,
      Thou shalt | be both | the plain|tiff and | the judge
                  ,    ,
      Of thine / own cause.
 
FABIAN
                                 ,        ,         ,
260                        Good mad|am, hear | me speak,
           ,         ,       ,         ,          ,
      And let | no quar|rel nor | no brawl | to come
        ,             ,       ,         ,         ,
      Taint the | condi|tion of | this pre|sent hour,
            ,         ,         ,        ,      2       ,
      Which I | have won|dered at.| In hope | it shall not,
             ,     ,        ,        ,         ,    ->
      Most free|ly I | confess | myself | and To||by
       ,        2    ,        ,         ,  2    ,
      Set | this device | against | Malvo|lio here,
         ,          ,        ,        ,          ,
      Upon | some stub|born and | uncour|teous parts
       ,    2       ,        ,            ,     ,
      We had con|ceived a|gainst him:| Mari|a writ
           ,     2    ,     ,         ,       ,
      The let|ter at Sir | Toby's | great im|portance;
          ,      ,           ,    ,         ,     2
      In re|compense | whereof | he hath | married her.
       ,      2      ,         ,        ,        ,
270   How with a | sportful | malice | it was | followed,
           ,        ,          ,         ,        ,
      May ra|ther pluck | on laugh|ter than | revenge;
           ,         ,     ,         ,        ,
      If that | the in|juries | be just|ly weighed
             ,     T   T    T       __     oo
      That have | on both sides | passed.|
 
OLIVIA
         ,     T    T    T        2      ,         ,
      Alas | poor fool, how | have they baf|fled thee?
 
CLOWN
Why, 'some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrown upon them.' I was one, sir, in this interlude; one Sir Topas, sir; but that's all one. 'By the Lord, fool, I am not mad.' But do you remember? 'Madam, why laugh you at such a barren rascal? an you smile not, he's gagged:' and thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.
 
MALVOLIO
        ,            ,                ,     ,        ,
275   I'll be | revenged | on the / whole pack | of you.
 
[Exit]
 
OLIVIA
           ,           ,       ,    2  ,      ,
      He hath | been most | notor|iously | abused.
 
DUKE ORSINO
          ,         ,        ,          ,       ,
      Pursue | him and | entreat | him to | a peace:
           ,          ,        ,        ,        ,
      He hath | not told | us of | the cap|tain yet:
             ,         ,          ,        ,         ,
      When that | is known | and gol|den time | convents,
         ,       ,     ,        ,          ,
280   A sol|emn com|bina|tion shall | be made
                 ,    ,          ,       ,    ,      .
      Of our / dear souls.| Meantime,| sweet sis/ter,
           ,          ,           ,        ,  2     ,
      We will | not part | from hence.| Cesa|rio come
            ,         ,          ,          ,       ,
      (For so | you shall | be while | you are | a man)
            ,       ,       ,       ,          ,
      But when | in o|ther ha|bits you | are seen,
         ,       ,         ,         ,         ,
      Orsi|no's mis|tress and | his fan|cy's queen.
 
[Exeunt all, except Clown]
 
CLOWN [Sings]
        ,      2     ,     2     ,         2   ,
      When that I | was and a | little | tiny boy,
            ,    __         ,       2       ,
      With hey,| ho,| the wind | and the rain,
         ,         ,          ,       ,
      A foo|lish thing | was but | a toy,
         2      ,         ,       ,  2   ,
      For the rain | it rain|eth ev|ery day.
            ,        ,         ,        ,
290   But when | I came | to man's | estate,
            ,    __         ,       2       ,
      With hey,| ho,| the wind | and the rain,
                ,            ,            ,            ,
      Gainst knaves | and thieves | men shut | their gate,
         2      ,         ,       ,  2   ,
      For the rain | it rain|eth ev|ery day.
            ,        ,       ,        ,
      But when | I came | alas | to wive,
            ,    __         ,       2       ,
      With hey,| ho,| the wind | and the rain,
           ,    2      ,        ,        ,
      By swag|gering could | I ne|ver thrive,
         2      ,         ,       ,  2   ,
      For the rain | it rain|eth ev|ery day.
            ,        ,       ,        ,
      But when | I came | unto | my beds,
            ,    __         ,       2       ,
      With hey,| ho,| the wind | and the rain,
             ,          ,           ,        ,
300   With toss-|pots^still | had drun|ken heads,
         2      ,         ,       ,  2   ,
      For the rain | it rain|eth ev|ery day.
          ,          2  ,         ,        ,
      A great | while^ago | the world | begun,
            ,    __         ,       2       ,
      With hey,| ho,| the wind | and the rain,
            ,           ,          ,         ,
      But that's | all one,| our play | is done,
         2         ,           ,          ,  2   ,
      And we'll strive | to please | you ev|ery day.
 
[Exit]

← Previous Scene | Main Page →


Home