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The Comedy of Errors

Act IV, Scene 3

A public place.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
         ,       2     ,        ,          ,       ,
      There's not a | man I | meet but | doth sa|lute me
          ,       ,            ,       ,          ,
      As if | I were | their well-|acquain|ted friend,
           ,      ,           ,        ,        ,
      And eve|ry one | doth call | me by | my name:
             ,       ,    2    ,     ,       ,
      Some* ten|der mo|ney to me,| some in|vite me;
           ,        ,          ,           ,      ,
      Some^o|ther give | me thanks | for kind|nesses;
        ,   ,             ,      ,        ,
      Some of/fer me | commo|dities | to buy.
        2   ,       ,         ,         ,         ,
      Even^now | a tai|lor called | me in | his shop,
             ,          ,           ,          ,          ,
      And showed | me silks | that he | had bought | for me,
            ,       ,      ,   ,         2      ,
      And there|withal | took mea/sure of my | body.
              ,          ,      ,    ,      ,
      Sure* these | are but | ima|gina|ry wiles,
           ,         ,      ,       ,       ,
      And Lap|land* sor|cerers | inha|bit here.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Master, here's the gold you sent me for. What, have you got the picture of old Adam new-apparelled?
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
What gold is this? what Adam dost thou mean?
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Not that Adam that kept the Paradise but that Adam that keeps the prison: he that goes in the calf's skin that was killed for the Prodigal; he that came behind you, sir, like an evil angel, and bid you forsake your liberty.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
I understand thee not.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
No? why, 'tis a plain case: he that went, like a bass-viol, in a case of leather; the man, sir, that, when gentlemen are tired, gives them a sob and 'rests them; he, sir, that takes pity on decayed men and gives them suits of durance; he that sets up his rest to do more exploits with his mace than a morris-pike.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
What, thou meanst an officer?
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Aye, sir, the sergeant of the band, he that brings any man to answer it that breaks his band; one that thinks a man always going to bed, and says, 'God give you good rest!'
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Well, sir, there rest in your foolery. Is there any
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Why, sir, I brought you word an hour since that the bark Expedition put forth tonight; and then were you hindered by the sergeant, to tarry for the hoy Delay. Here are the angels that you sent for to deliver you.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
           ,       ,        ,          ,      ,
      The fel|low is | distract,| and so | am I,
            ,        ,       ,      ,        o
      And here | we wan|der in | illu|sions:
             ,        x        ,      ,          ,
      Some^bles|sed power | deli|ver us | from hence.
 
COURTEZAN
            ,          ,     ,          ,     ,
      Well^met,| well^met,| Master | Anti|pholus:
         ,         ,           ,           ,         ,
      I see | sir you | have found | the gold|smith^now:
           ,          ,          ,         ,      ,
      Is that | the chain | you pro|mised me | today.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
       ,         ,         ,            ,         ,
      Satan | avoid,| I charge | thee tempt | me not.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
       ,         2      ,         ,
      Master,| is this Mis|tress Sa|tan?
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
                                          ,     2      x
                                         It | is the devil.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Nay, she is worse, she is the devil's dam; and here she comes in the habit of a light wench: and thereof comes that the wenches say 'God damn me;' that's as much to say 'God make me a light wench.' It is written, they appear to men like angels of light: light is an effect of fire, and fire will burn; ergo, light wenches will burn. Come not near her.
 
COURTEZAN
Your man and you are marvellous merry, sir. Will you go with me? We'll mend our dinner here?
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Master, if you do, expect spoon-meat; or bespeak a long spoon.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Why, Dromio?
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Marry, he must have a long spoon that must eat with the devil.
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
         ,           ,             ,       ,    2      ,
      Avoid | then fiend,| what tellst | thou me of | supping?
            ,        ,         ,       ,      ,
      Thou art,| as you | are all | a sor|ceress:
         ,         ,         ,          ,         ,
      I con|jure thee | to leave | me, and | be gone.
 
COURTEZAN
        ,             ,         ,         ,        ,
      Give me the | ring of | mine you | had at | dinner,
       ,    2      ,              ,          ,     ,
      Or for my | diamond | the chain | you pro|mised,
            ,         ,                ,    ,       ,
      And I'll | be gone | sir, and / not trou|ble you.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Some devils ask but the parings of one's nail, a rush, a hair, a drop of blood, a pin, a nut, a cherry-stone; but she, more covetous, would have a chain. Master, be wise: an if you give it her, the devil will shake her chain and fright us with it.
 
COURTEZAN
          ,         ,         ,         ,          ,
      I pray | you sir | my ring,| or else | the chain,
          ,         ,         ,         ,         ,
      I hope | you do | not mean | to cheat | me so?
 
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
         ,            ,           ,   2   ,        ,
      Avaunt | thou witch:| Come^Dro|mio let | us go.
 
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Fly pride says the peacock, mistress that you know.
 
[Exeunt Antipholus of SYRACUSE and Dromio of SYRACUSE]
 
COURTEZAN
           ,         ,        ,     ,        ,
      Now out | of doubt | Anti|pholus | is mad,
        ,              ,      ,       ,         ,
      Else would | he ne|ver so | demean | himself,
          ,         ,         ,           ,      ,      ->
      A ring | he hath | of mine | worth^for|ty du||cats,
       ,       2      ,        ,         ,       ,
      And | for the same | he pro|mised me | a chain,
            ,        ,       ,       ,        ,
      Both^one | and o|ther he | denies | me now:
           ,        ,       ,       ,       ,
      The rea|son that | I ga|ther he | is mad,
          ,           ,        ,         ,         ,
      Besides | this pre|sent in|stance^of | his rage,
              ,    ,         ,       ,          x
      Is a / mad tale | he told | today | at dinner,
        2     ,      ,     2       ,       ,          ,
      Of his own | doors being | shut a|gainst his | entrance.
          ,          ,        ,         ,          ,
      Belike | his wife | acquain|ted with | his fits,
          ,         ,          ,         ,          ,
      On pur|pose shut | the doors | against | his way:
          ,        ,        ,      ,             ,
      My way | is now | to hie | home to | his house,
            ,          ,          ,      ,    ,
      And tell | his wife,| that be|ing lu|natic,
            ,        ,        ,           ,         ,
      He rushed | into | my house,| and took | perforce
           ,      ,            ,        ,          ,
      My ring | away.| This course | I fit|test choose,
           ,      ,            ,    ,         ,
      For for|ty du|cats is / too much | to lose.
 
[Exit]

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